recentpopularlog in

jerryking : climate_corporation   14

Schumpeter: Digital disruption on the farm
May 24th 2014 | | The Economist |From the print edition

Its story begins in 2006 with a Silicon Valley startup, the Climate Corporation. Set up by two former Google employees, it used remote sensing and other cartographic techniques to map every field in America (all 25m of them) and superimpose on that all the climate information that it could find. By 2010 its database contained 150 billion soil observations and 10 trillion weather-simulation points...The Climate Corporation planned to use these data to sell crop insurance. But last October Monsanto bought the company for about $1 billion—one of the biggest takeovers of a data firm yet seen. Monsanto, the world’s largest hybrid-seed producer, has a library of hundreds of thousands of seeds, and terabytes of data on their yields. By adding these to the Climate Corporation’s soil- and-weather database, it produced a map of America which says which seed grows best in which field, under what conditions.
disruption  farming  Monsanto  agriculture  Climate_Corporation  massive_data_sets  digital_disruption 
may 2014 by jerryking
Silicon Valley Big Data Startup Bought for $930M by ... Monsanto? -
October 2, 2013 Liz Gannes - News - AllThingsD Liz Gannes - News - AllThingsD.

Climate Corporation had built a network of insurance sellers for both crop insurance and weather insurance, and offered Web and mobile tools for farmers so they could make decisions about how to do their work. It has thousands of customers with many millions of acres in the U.S.
Monsanto  Climate_Corporation  Silicon_Valley  analytics  farming  agriculture  crop_insurance  weather  insurance 
january 2014 by jerryking
When data meets agriculture: Monsanto to buy Climate Corp. for $930M — Tech News and Analysis
Oct. 2, 2013 | GigaOM | By Stacey Higginbotham.

Monsanto, the giant agricultural company, says it will acquire data analytics firm the Climate Corp. in a cash deal valued at $930 million. This deal is an obvious extension of data analytics into the world of big agriculture, but it’s also a perfect example of how the combo of data and the internet of things is going to disrupt established industries in a way that traditional computing never could.

Climate Corp offered targeted insurance policies to farmers that incorporated all sorts of data about historical and current agriculture and weather....as climate change disrupts historical weather patterns, this boosts the risks to farmers that weather events might destroy crops, but it also changes the types of crops they should plant. Thus the data analysis that Climate Corp. offers is not only valuable to farmers today, but also to Monsanto as it tries to create crops that will thrive as the climate changes.
data  Monsanto  Climate_Corporation  agriculture  farming  weather  insurance  climate_change  risks  risk-management 
january 2014 by jerryking
Why Monsanto Spent $1 Billion on Climate Data - Modern Farmer
By Dan Mitchell on October 2, 2013

Climate Corporation doesn’t limit itself to weather data. As politicians, pundits, and people on the Internet continue to argue over whether climate change is real, the insurance industry has for years been operating under the assumption that it is. So Climate Corporation uses data from major climate-change models — the very ones that are under constant assault by doubters — in its calculations.

Climate Corporation manages an eye-popping 50 terabytes of live data, all at once. Besides climate-change models, data is collected from regular old weather forecasts and histories, soil observations, and other sources. The company collects data from 2.5 million separate locations. Given these numbers, it shouldn’t be surprising that Climate Corporation is basically alone in this market. The barriers to entry are immense.

The company makes use of “machine learning” —a kind of artificial intelligence. That’s the technology behind, for example, determining which of your incoming email messages are spam —except in this case the tech is much, much more sophisticated. Each new bit of data that’s entered into the system — rainfall in Douglas County Nebraska, say, or the average heat index in Louisiana’s Winn Parish —helps it learn, and more accurately forecast what will happen in the future.
Monsanto  Climate_Corporation  weather  crop_insurance  insurance  massive_data_sets  data_driven  machine_learning  artificial_intelligence 
october 2013 by jerryking
A Big Exit For A Big Agri Data Startup: Who's Next? - Forbes
10/03/2013 | Forbes | by Gil Press.

With new data collection devices and increased regulatory reporting requirements, the volume of agricultural data is growing rapidly and the race is on to develop the best models. One corner of this vast market is a good example of what can happen when quantitative methods are applied to what previously has been a matter of smart guesses.
massive_data_sets  agriculture  farming  Monsanto  Climate_Corporation  Solum  Farmeron  AgSmarts  i-Linc  Land_O’Lakes  John_Deere  dairy 
october 2013 by jerryking
Why Big Ag Likes Big Data - NYTimes.com
October 2, 2013, 3:02 pm 1 Comment
Why Big Ag Likes Big Data
By QUENTIN HARDY
massive_data_sets  agriculture  agribusiness  farming  data_mining  databases  GE  Climate_Corporation  Monsanto 
october 2013 by jerryking
Push to exploit an ocean of information
Richard Waters Source: The Financial Times. (Dec. 10, 2012): News: p19

Like anticipating film demand and judging the effectiveness of window displays, much of the effort in the field of big data analytics is aimed at making existing companies more effective. Designing products, setting optimal prices and reaching the best prospects among potential customers are turning into data-driven exercises.

But it is also throwing up disruptive new businesses. Companies set up from scratch have the chance to draw on public streams of digital data to enter markets that were once closed to incumbents with long-established customer relationships and proprietary information. And such businesses come without the legacy technology platforms, entrenched business processes and cultural norms that make it hard for big groups to change.

"Even if you're not a bank or a healthcare company, you can play in banking or healthcare," says James Manyika, director at McKinsey's research arm.
massive_data_sets  Quantifind  Hollywood  Climate_Corporation  sensors  Euclid_Analytics  Kabbage  Factual  disruption  start_ups  McKinsey  data_driven  new_businesses  large_companies  open_data  legacy_players  digital_disruption  customer_relationships  legacy_tech  cultural_norms  Richard_Waters 
february 2013 by jerryking
Weather insurance: Agriculture and algorithms
Nov 19th 2012 | | The Economist |by T.R. | BERLIN

Mass suicides are a shocking reminder of a global problem caused by global warming. Farming has always been a gamble, but the growing number of “unusual weather events”, as experts call them, make seeding and harvesting an even riskier business...The Climate Corporation, a start-up based in Silicon Valley, wants to reverse the trend and reduce farmers’ financial risks—by crossing agriculture with the IT industry’s latest trend: big data. The firm is collecting all kinds of information—including on weather patterns, climate trends and soil characteristics—and analyses the data down to an individual field. These insights are then used to offer farmers tailored insurance policies against the damage from extreme weather events....marketing is an equally big challenge for the six-year-old company. Farmers are least likely to be early adopters, especially when it comes to a new product that lives in a computing cloud, admits Mr Friedberg. The Climate Corporation has a website where customers can buy policies online. But it had to learn that selling its insurance to farmers in remote areas is best done through a network of agents.
weather  insurance  algorithms  agriculture  farming  climate_change  financial_risk  Climate_Corporation  Weatherbill 
december 2012 by jerryking
How big data will help manage a world of 7 billion people — Cleantech News and Analysis
3. The Climate Corporation. Formerly called WeatherBill, the now renamed Climate Corporation uses big data tools to offer analytics and reports to the agriculture industry, and also sells a weather insurance product to farmers, to help protect them from losses from extreme weather events. The world has seen a rise in extreme weather events, partly do to a change in climate, and farmers can expect more of this unpredictability going forward. Combined with more unpredictable weather, food prices will likely rise as the population grows and usable land becomes constrained, particularly in developing countries.
Weatherbill  Climate_Corporation  massive_data_sets  weather  agriculture  farming  insurance  crop_insurance  climate_change 
may 2012 by jerryking
Big Data in the Dirt (and the Cloud) - NYTimes.com
By QUENTIN HARDY
| October 11, 2011

“We took 60 years of crop yield data, and 14 terabytes of information on soil types, every two square miles for the United States, from the Department of Agriculture,” says David Friedberg, chief executive of the Climate Corporation, a name WeatherBill started using Tuesday. “We match that with the weather information for one million points the government scans with Doppler radar — this huge national infrastructure for storm warnings — and make predictions for the effect on corn, soybeans and winter wheat.”

The product, insurance against things like drought, too much rain at the planting or the harvest, or an early freeze, is sold through 10,000 agents nationwide.
massive_data_sets  weather  insurance  WeatherBill  agriculture  farming  crop_insurance  Climate_Corporation 
february 2012 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read