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Slowly, new attitudes taking root across America’s Old South - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
Slowly, new attitudes taking root across America’s Old South
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 01, 2015
Marcus_Gee  the_South  race_relations  Civil_War  racism  slavery  South_Carolina  race  Confederacy  symbolism  flags  Charleston_shootings 
september 2015 by jerryking
Confederate Memorials as Instruments of Racial Terror - The New York Times
JULY 24, 2015 | NYT | By BRENT STAPLES.

In the wake of the Charleston massacre, for example, the parks and recreation board of Birmingham, Ala., voted to explore a proposal that would remove a 52-foot Confederate memorial from the entrance of a prominent park and place it with a Confederate heritage group.

Not all monuments warrant that kind of challenge. But those honoring the Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest deserve the backlash they have generated. Forrest presided over the 1864 massacre of Union soldiers, many of them black, at Fort Pillow in Tennessee. He was also a prominent slave trader and served as the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan.

Apologists argue that his involvement with the Klan was unimportant because he later adopted more enlightened views. But as the Forrest biographer Jack Hurst writes, by lending his name to the K.K.K. even temporarily, the general accelerated its development. “As the Klan’s first national leader,” Mr. Hurst writes, “he became the Lost Cause’s avenging angel, galvanizing a loose collection of boyish secret social clubs into a reactionary instrument of terror still feared today.”....Critics predictably condemn these efforts as bad-faith attempts to rewrite history. But what’s happening is that communities that were once bound and gagged on this issue are now free to contest a version of history that was created to reinforce racial subjugation.

They are reflecting on how to honor history — including the neglected history of African-Americans — and rightly deciding that some figures who were enshrined as heroes in the past do not deserve to be valorized in public places.
the_South  KKK  Confederacy  terrorism  white_supremacy  history  symbolism  race  African-Americans  Charleston_shootings  Reconstruction  race_relations  racial_discrimination  racial_segregation  racism  violence  Jim_Crow  race-baiting 
july 2015 by jerryking
Lowering of Confederate flag marks both an end and a beginning - The Globe and Mail
Omar El Akkad
Lowering of Confederate flag marks both an end and a beginning
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 10, 2015
flags  symbolism  Charleston_shootings  the_South  Confederacy  Omar_el_Akkad  slavery 
july 2015 by jerryking
The Right Way to Remember the Confederacy
In June of 1865, Confederate Gen. Joseph Shelby and about a thousand of his cavalrymen rode into Mexico and exile rather than remain in a conquered South. As they forded the Rio Grande, they stopped…
secession  slavery  the_South  Confederacy  Civil_War  flags  symbolism  white_supremacy  Charleston_shootings 
july 2015 by jerryking
Divisive questions: Remove Confederate monuments or use them to educate?
Just down the road from the church where a racist gunman killed nine people last month stands a tall column in a grassy square. Atop it stands an imperious figure with a cape over his shoulders, a…
racism  slavery  South_Carolina  race  Confederacy  symbolism  flags  Marcus_Gee  the_South 
july 2015 by jerryking
Obama delivers eulogy for Charleston preacher, sings ‘Amazing Grace’ - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
CHARLESTON, S.C. — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 26, 2015

Since he was elected in 2008 and became the first black man to sit in the Oval Office, Mr. Obama has usually been cautious in his pronouncements about race, speaking out only after incidents like the fatal shooting of black teenager Trayvon Martin or the violence after the police shooting of a black man in Ferguson, Mo.

But the attack on a Charleston church last week was on another scale. The emotions it has provoked and the issues it has raised clearly called for a deeper, stronger response.

The result was an oration in which a president drawing toward the end of his second and final term put caution aside and jumped into the discussion of race that he himself is such a part of. He spoke to console but also to challenge, calling on Americans not to squander the moment of grief and of anguished questioning that has followed the Charleston killings....The best way to do that, he said, is not just to have yet another “conversation” about race but to work on the country’s problems, from poverty to failing schools to the “unique mayhem” of gun violence to the many thousands of men marooned in the vast U.S. prison system.

This was Mr. Obama’s first opportunity to speak at length about the shocking church killings that have Americans talking once again about racism, racial division and the sources of hate. Mr. Obama is reported to have been working on his speech all week.

When it came to delivering it, he was direct. Mr. Obama said the country had been blind to hurt caused by the waving of the Confederate flag – a symbol, he said, not just of ancestral pride but of “racial subjugation.” He said that the cause for which Confederates fought – “the cause of slavery – was wrong.”

He praised South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley for moving to take down the rebel flag that flies on the grounds of the State House.

“But I don’t think God wants us to stop there. For too long, we’ve been blind to the way past injustices continue to shape the present.”
Obama  Marcus_Gee  tributes  Charleston_shootings  Clementa_Pinckney  grief  eulogies  racial_subjugation  Confederacy  slavery 
june 2015 by jerryking
The Robert E. Lee Problem - The New York Times
JUNE 26, 2015
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David Brooks
the_South  David_Brooks  Confederacy  treason  flags  symbolism  racism 
june 2015 by jerryking
Tearing Down the Confederate Flag Is Just a Start - The New York Times
JUNE 24, 2015 | NYT | Nicholas Kristof.

the movement is in some ways chimerical. It’s about a symbol — and now the progress on the symbol needs to be matched by progress on racial inequality in daily life.

America’s greatest shame in 2015 is not a piece of cloth. It’s that a black boy has a life expectancy five years shorter than a white boy. It’s that the net worth of the average black household in 2011 was $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, according to census data.

It’s that almost two-thirds of black children grow up in low-income families. It’s that more than one-third of inner-city black kids suffer lead poisoning (and thus often lifelong brain impairment), mostly from old lead paint in substandard housing.

More consequential than that flag is our flawed system of school finance that perpetuates inequity. Black students in America are much less likely than whites to attend schools offering advanced science and math courses.

The one public system in which America goes out of its way to provide services to African-Americans is prison.
Nicholas_Kristof  flags  Charleston_shootings  institutional_racism  rebellions  slavery  Nat_Turner  Confederacy 
june 2015 by jerryking
Confederate Flags and Institutional Racism - The New York Times
JUNE 24, 2015 | NYT | Charles Blow.

Aspen Institute’s definition: “Institutional racism refers to the policies and practices within and across institutions that, intentionally or not, produce outcomes that chronically favor, or put a racial group at a disadvantage.”
Nikki_Haley  racism  institutional_racism  Charles_Blow  the_South  Confederacy  flags  Charleston_shootings 
june 2015 by jerryking
Confederate flag supporters are suddenly in full retreat
Arthur Ravenel, Jr., was a significant enough figure in South Carolina politics to have a bridge named after him. The sweeping eight-lane structure links downtown Charleston with the suburb of Mount…
racism  flags  symbolism  Nikki_Haley  South_Carolina  Confederacy  the_South 
june 2015 by jerryking
Alabama governor compares Confederate battle flag to swastika
By MIKE ISAAC JULY 6 2015
The Confederate flag flew high Wednesday outside the South Carolina Statehouse, but a large drape kept mourners from seeing it as they filed past the open casket of a veteran black lawmaker and…
Columbia  South_Carolina  Nikki_Haley  flags  symbolism  Charleston_shootings  the_South  Confederacy 
june 2015 by jerryking
White Supremacists Without Borders - The New York Times
JUNE 22, 2015 | NYT|MORRIS DEES and J. RICHARD COHEN.

This month, S.P.L.C. staffers will join activists from the United States and Europe at a conference in Budapest about this transnational white supremacism that is emerging as the world grows more connected by technology. The message of white genocide is spreading. White nationalists look beyond borders for confirmation that their race is under attack, and they share their ideas in the echo chamber of racist websites.

The days of thinking of domestic terrorism as the work of a few Klansmen or belligerent skinheads are over. We know Islamic terrorists are thinking globally, and we confront that threat. We’ve been too slow to realize that white supremacists are doing the same.
Charleston_shootings  white_supremacy  globalization  terrorism  racism  Confederacy  white_nationalists  nationalism  echo_chambers 
june 2015 by jerryking
In Charleston, a Millennial Race Terrorist - The New York Times
JUNE 21, 2015| NYT | Charles Blow.

Who radicalized Roof? Who passed along the poison? We must never be lulled into a false belief that racism is dying off with older people. As I’ve written in this space before, Spencer Piston, an assistant professor of political science at Syracuse University, has found that “younger (under-30) whites are just as likely as older ones to view whites as more intelligent and harder-working than African-Americans.”..... there is a widely published photo of Roof sitting on his car with an ornamental license plate with Confederate flags on it. That is the same Confederate flag that flies on the grounds of the state Capitol. What signal is South Carolina sending?

There is the thread of couching his cowardice as chivalry, framing his selfish hatred as noble altruism in defense of white femininity from the black brute. So much black blood has been spilled and so many black necks noosed in the name of protecting white femininity, and by extension, white purity. Roof is only this trope’s latest instrument.
Charleston_shootings  Charles_Blow  racism  South_Carolina  terrorism  Confederacy  white_supremacy  millennials 
june 2015 by jerryking
The sinister side of a Civil War surplus shop in Georgia - The Globe and Mail
OMAR EL AKKAD
The sinister side of a Civil War surplus shop in Georgia
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Apr. 08 2015

just across the street from that museum is an even more iconic Kennesaw landmark – a run-down, Old West saloon-looking building whose ground-floor porch is draped with myriad flags of the Confederacy. This is Wildman’s place: part store, part “museum.”

Inside, the cramped, dusty enclosure looks like someone’s overstuffed attic. Massive, multivolume sets of Civil War history sit alongside bizarre, self-published diatribes detailing the grand plans of the Illuminati. There’s a flimsy, plastic clock designed to count down to President Barack Obama's last day in office; there’s a big sign above the cluttered hovel of a cash register that reads: “White Trash.”

But move further into the store – to the very back, into an area described as a museum – and you’ll find something far more sinister. The walls and shelves are lined with grotesquely racist depictions of black people, complete with all the usual tropes – big lips, watermelons, the works. There’s shrines to the Klan, to white power.
Omar_el_Akkad  Civil_War  the_South  retailers  history  white_supremacy  Georgia  Jim_Crow  racism  collectibles  Confederacy 
april 2015 by jerryking
Confederate flag ugly symbol of human bondage that should not be used - The Globe and Mail
March 7, 2013 | Globe & Mail
The flag of the Confederate States during the American Civil War has been the subject of recent controversy in two places in Ontario. Though it should not be prohibited as hate speech, Canadians should not regard the flag as a harmless cultural symbol. There would have been no such Confederacy and no such emblem if slavery had not existed in the southern United States. What some Southerners euphemistically called the “peculiar institution” was at the very core of the war.

In Hamilton, a two-location barbecue restaurant called Hillbilly Heaven displays the Confederate flag, giving offence to many in an area that was a leading destination for escaped slaves on the Underground Railroad. And in Sutton, Ont., on Lake Simcoe, the local high school has banned the use of the same flag on its premises; many students had adopted it by association with country and western music.

Hillbilly Heaven should be allowed to use the Confederate flag, just as people should be free not to eat there. The school is another matter; a public institution should not condone an expression of racism and human bondage on its grounds.
the_South  slavery  Ontario  high_schools  restaurants  Confederacy  symbolism  Civil_War 
march 2013 by jerryking
America's Bloodiest Day - NYTimes.com
September 17, 2012, 12:30 pm9 Comments
America’s Bloodiest Day
By RICK BEARD
Civil_War  history  The_South  Confederacy 
september 2012 by jerryking
Book Review: America's Great Debate - WSJ.com
April 22, 2012| WSJ |By DAVID S. REYNOLDS

Statesmanship In a Divided Era
Fisticuffs on the floor of Congress, Southern threats of secession, saber-rattling over slavery in new states. And then: compromise.
slavery  Jim_Crow  the_South  Confederacy  statesmanship  books  book_reviews 
april 2012 by jerryking
How America's Civil War Changed the World - WSJ.com
APRIL 9, 2011

How America's Civil War Changed the World
Imagine how the last 150 years would have been different had the North not freed the slaves and saved the Union.

By FERGUS M. BORDEWICH

Had the Confederacy won its independence, the immediate consequences for African-Americans would have been catastrophic: possible pogroms against self-emancipated blacks who had taken up arms against their former masters, and decades or generations more of slavery for the rest, underpinned by an official racial ideology.

Formal slavery would eventually have come to an end, because it was economically inefficient. But in a nation founded on the permanent control of a huge, despised and feared minority, the Confederate version of "freedom" would doubtless have meant the restriction of blacks to segregated townships and institutionalized repression of blacks and dissident whites.

Although antebellum Southern states were robustly democratic for whites who supported slavery, these same states routinely denied freedom of speech, press and assembly to anyone who opposed it. In contrast to a United States striving to perfect human liberty, the Confederate States would have offered the world a model for racial oppression well into the 20th century.
slavery  the_South  civil_war  counterfactual_history  Confederacy  antebellum 
november 2011 by jerryking
When Cotton Was King - NYTimes.com
March 26, 2011, 6:30 pm
When Cotton Was King
By GENE DATTEL
cotton  agriculture  slavery  the_South  Confederacy 
march 2011 by jerryking
The South's Capital Dilemma - NYTimes.com
March 21, 2011, 9:30 pm
The South’s Capital Dilemma
By FORD RISLEY
The article states, without any supporting arguments, "Even then
Confederate politicians knew their decision [on where to site the
capital] could mean life or death for their young country.' Why?

Later, the article correctly states that making Richmond the capital
resulted in repeated campaigns by the Union to take the city -- but the
rebs kept beating back those attempts. It also discusses Richmond's
industrial strength, and a good school system -- but it does not explain
why those things were important to the capital city. Washington, DC,
seems to get along fine without either one, today.

With all due respect for the author of this piece, and for the generally
high level of scholarship in the series, that original assertion seems
to hang out there, waiving in the wind, unsupported by fact or logic.
Civil_War  letters_to_the_editor  the_South  Confederacy  Richmond  Virginia 
march 2011 by jerryking
The Ghost of Bobby Lee
Apr 13 2010 | The Atlantic | Ta-Nehisi_Coates
Ta-Nehisi_Coates  Confederacy 
april 2010 by jerryking

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