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jerryking : corporate_canada   6

Another one bites the dust: Goldcorp sale a further example of the hollowing out of Corporate Canada - The Globe and Mail
ERIC REGULY EUROPEAN BUREAU CHIEF
ROME
PUBLISHED JANUARY 14, 2019

Toronto’s Barrick Gold Corp. always wanted to team up with Newmont Mining Corp. of Colorado. Merging the two giants, which have adjoining operations in gold-rich Nevada, would have created an unassailable industry leader and reduced costs by an estimated US$1-billion a year. On paper, it looked like a dream deal. But it never got off the ground, in good part because Barrick founder Peter Munk wanted the new company to stay in Toronto, not move to Denver.

Were he alive today, Mr. Munk – a Canadian patriot who believed in the value of head offices – would be distraught. In the fall, Barrick bought Randgold Resources but handed management control to Randgold’s executives, who promptly gutted Barrick’s Toronto headquarters, leaving the world’s top producer with a mere 65 employees in its echo-chamber offices on Bay Street. The deal was, in effect, a reverse takeover. The new Barrick will be run from the Channel Islands........Toronto still fancies itself the mining capital of the world, a bold claim given that it is now largely devoid of A-team and even B-team players. Barrick was the last miner in Canada that could be considered world class, and it’s fading from view as a Canadian company. All the big base-metal names are gone, bar Teck Resources. Goldcorp is going. Who’s next? Could it be the well-regarded Agnico Eagle Mines (market value $12.4-billion) or B2Gold ($3.7-billion)?

Aside from the loss of their Toronto stock-market listings, the endless elimination of head offices across Canada rots the country’s social fabric. Head offices provide high-paying, high-skilled job opportunities and create an ecosystem of spinoff jobs, from accountants and chefs to limo drivers and lawyers. Head offices bolster the financial-services industry, which underwrites bond and equity sales and sponsors the arts and charities. When head offices disappear, so does talent. If you want a top-level management job in mining, an industry that shaped Canada, forget Toronto. Today, the opportunities are in London, Johannesburg and Melbourne...........In a largely open economy such as Canada’s (banks, big telecoms and media companies are still protected from foreign takeovers), it’s hard to stop head offices from disappearing. The cult of shareholder capitalism produces unsentimental results, such as the eradication of underperforming companies. But Canadian investors and managers have proven time after time that they’re happier to sell rather than build, happy to take a quick buck rather than take a long-term gamble on a double or triple. The cost of doing so is a hollowed-out corporate sector – a branch-plant economy.
Barrick  Corporate_Canada  Eric_Reguly  Goldcorp  head_offices  hollowing_out  Peter_Munk  sellout_culture  social_fabric 
january 2019 by jerryking
The gutting of Barrick Gold – it didn’t have to be this way - The Globe and Mail
ERIC REGULY EUROPEAN BUREAU CHIEF
ROME
PUBLISHED JANUARY 4, 2019

Most big companies Eric Reguly followed – Inco, Falconbridge, Alcan, Dofasco, Molson, Fairmont, Four Seasons, among others – were flogged to foreigners, their head offices downgraded to branch plants or eliminated. ....Canadians were sellers, not builders.....If there was one company that was safe from the takeover onslaught, it was Barrick Gold, I thought......At the time, Barrick was run by its founder, Peter Munk, the Hungarian-born Canadian patriot who wanted to build the world’s biggest gold miner. After achieving that goal, he mused about creating a diversified resources giant, the equivalent of a BHP Billiton or Rio Tinto under the Maple Leaf. But he was too late: By the time he was ready to put the pieces together, in the middle part of the previous decade, all his potential targets, including Inco, had been plucked clean from the Toronto stock market.....
Eric_Reguly  branch_plants  head_offices  hollowing_out  John_Thornton  large_companies  LSE  mining  Peter_Munk  Pierre_Lassonde  sellout_culture  TMX  Barrick  Corporate_Canada 
january 2019 by jerryking
Run on the firm may signal Heenan’s demise
BRIAN MILNER
Run on the firm may signal Heenan’s demise Add to ...
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The Globe and Mail

It’s a fate that awaits other mid-level law firms whose business model is no longer working in a rapidly changing environment. Firms like Heenan Blaikie are being squeezed mercilessly both from above and below – by the heavyweights chasing after business they once ignored as unworthy of their lofty status, and by more nimble specialist firms with lower expenses (including less lavish offices) and cheaper fees.

Like accounting firms and investment banks, law firms are also facing the long-predicted downdrafts emanating from the hollowing out of corporate Canada. As Canadian subsidiaries have ceded greater control to their foreign owners, a chunk of their financial and legal business in Canada has migrated to head offices in other countries.

Published Tuesday, Feb. 04 2014
law_firms  Bay_Street  dissolutions  Heenan_Blaikie  winner-take-all  head_offices  hollowing_out  boutiques  specialists  mid-sized  rapid_change  barbell_effect  Corporate_Canada  mercilessness 
february 2014 by jerryking
Harper wanted wireless competition. All he got was grief -
Sep. 09 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by Konrad Yakabuski.

Ottawa has had every good reason to seek to inject competition into Canada’s wireless sector. Our trio of telecommunications conglomerates have behaved as any loosely regulated oligopoly would, effectively eliminating consumer choice with identical pricing and straitjacketed product offerings. They have deftly split the Canadian market equally among themselves, ensuring heady profit margins. As far as Rogers, Bell and Telus are concerned, the status quo is heaven....Pity Mr. Harper. He has nothing to show for five years of attempts to spur competition in Canada’s wireless sector except the ire of corporate Canada and thousands of Rogers, Bell and Telus employees. Consumers, a diffuse constituency, were never going to reward the Conservatives for lower cellular prices. (As if they’d let that determine their vote.) But you can bet employees of the Big Three will remember the summer of ’13 when they next go to the ballot box.
Konrad_Yakabuski  wireless  telecommunications  oligopolies  Verizon  constituencies  Corporate_Canada 
september 2013 by jerryking

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