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jerryking : cosmopolitan   28

Opinion | Netflix Is Shrinking the World - The New York Times
Netflix, which has become the internet’s most invaluable and intoxicating portal to the parts of planet Earth that aren’t America......A win by “Roma” would be a fitting testament to Netflix’s ambitions. Virtually alone among tech and media companies, Netflix intends to ride a new kind of open-border digital cosmopolitanism to the bank.......Netflix, which has 139 million paying members around the world, has lately become something more than a licenser of other countries’ escapist television.

In 2016, the company expanded to 190 countries, and last year, for the first time, a majority of its subscribers and most of its revenue came from outside the United States. To serve this audience, Netflix now commissions and licenses hundreds of shows meant to echo life in every one of its markets and, in some cases, to blend languages and sensibilities across its markets......Netflix has discovered something startling: Despite a supposed surge in nationalism across the globe, many people like to watch movies and TV shows from other countries. ....Hollywood and Silicon Valley have long pursued expansion internationally. But Netflix's strategy is fundamentally different. Instead of trying to sell American ideas to a foreign audience, it’s aiming to sell international ideas to a global audience.....a crucial difference between Netflix and other tech giants: Netflix makes money from subscriptions, not advertising.....This simple difference flips all of its incentives. It means that Netflix has a reason to satisfy every new customer, not just the ones in the most prosperous markets. Each new title carries subtitles in 26 languages, and the company is creating high-quality, properly lip-synced audio dubbing in 10 languages. For years, Netflix has roiled the film and TV business in Hollywood with its billions. Now it’s taking its money — the company spent $12 billion on content in 2018 and is projected to spend $15 billion this year — to film and TV producers in France, Spain, Brazil, India, South Korea and the Middle East, among other places.

Because it is spending so much on shows from everywhere, Netflix has an incentive to get the biggest bang for its buck by pushing them widely across its user base. Its algorithms are tuned toward expanding your interests rather than narrowing them. As a result, many of Netflix’s shows are watched widely beyond their local markets......Netflix does seem to be pushing cultural boundaries and sparking new conversations all over the world....It’s legitimate to ask how long Netflix will be able to keep up this cross-border conversation — whether, as it keeps growing, it will have to make legal or moral compromises with local censors or other would-be cultural arbiters.

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Matt
Michigan2h ago
Farhad, I totally enjoyed your extrospection of Netflix as a global epoch-maker and change agent. This is globalization at its best. Netflix is outsourcing (crowdsourcing), outspending, and outwitting the Hollywood (s) of this world. Its recipe is simple yet profound: telling the stories of people, everywhere in this world, to themselves in their down-to-earth languages and customs. And technology has everything to do with it. Netflix would not have been where it is today if it was not for streaming technology. The assertion is true: technology is bring the world closer together.

By Farhad Manjoo
Opinion Columnist

Feb. 22, 2019
content_creators  cosmopolitan  cross-cultural  entertainment  Farhad_Manjoo  globalization  Hollywood  international_expansion  internationalization  international_diversity  Netflix  original_programming  streaming  user_bases 
february 2019 by jerryking
Guardiola: what Britain can learn from football’s philosopher king
Janan Ganesh

JANUARY 5, 2018

Guardiola’s mastery of the English Premier League is a chastening moment in national life. His foreignness is beside the point. The most cosmopolitan league in the world’s most global game is used to coaches, owners and players of exotic provenance. The sore point is his footballing style, or “philosophy”, as the sport grandiloquently puts it. He cherishes skill over physicality, baroque passing patterns over aerial punts, detailed tactics over raw volume of sweat. In short, he rejects what used to be known as the British way.
soccer  strategic_thinking  Janan_Ganesh  cosmopolitan  English_Premier_League 
january 2018 by jerryking
Open books, open borders
OCTOBER 20, 2017 | FT| Janan Ganesh.

The globalised Booker also confirms this medium-sized country’s knack for cultural decorations — degrees from its universities, air time on the BBC — that are coveted worldwide. The unfakeable emotion from Saunders and Beatty upon receipt of the prize was a larger compliment to Britain and its soft power than a Booker for one of its own would have been.....There is a strategic imperative to open up that goes beyond the aesthetic one. As the gap narrows between the superpower and the rest, it becomes more important for America to understand the outside world. Better foreign news coverage can help, but mere politics is downstream of culture. The real prize is to comprehend another country’s thought patterns, speech rhythms, historic ghosts and unconscious biases — and these seep out from the stories it tells and the way it tells them....Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker cites the spread of literacy as a reason for the long-term decline of human violence. To read another person’s story is to end up with a larger “circle of sympathy”. But even if America’s concern is the narrowest raison d’état, rather than world peace, it would profit from reading beyond its borders.

The minimum return is that more American readers would have more fun. The headiest writing tends to come from places that are ascendant enough to matter but raw enough to retain some measure of dramatic chaos: 19th-century Britain and Russia, mid-20th-century America, and now, perhaps, early 21st-century Asia. It is not just in economics that protectionism stifles.
books  cosmopolitan  cross-cultural  cultural_products  empathy  fiction  George_Saunders  Janan_Ganesh  literature  Man_Booker  middle-powers  national_identity  novels  open_borders  open_mind  parochialism  prizes  protectionism  reading  soft_power  storytelling  United_Kingdom  writers 
november 2017 by jerryking
Monocle editor-in-chief Tyler Brûlé is a rare believer in print - The Globe and Mail
ERIC REGULY - EUROPEAN BUREAU CHIEF
LONDON — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 23, 2016

Wallpaper was Mr. Brule’s first media success story, even if it was, for him, a financial dud. ...Wallpaper, focused on fashion, design, travel and art and, as does Monocle today, highlighted top-quality products and services as opposed to merely “luxury” offerings in all their potential vulgarity. The magazine was launched in 1996 – “It ran out of money right away” – and Mr. Brûlé sold it to Time Warner (now Time Inc.) a year later. In 1998, Wallpaper started Winkreative, a brand design and strategy agency that, lately, designed the brand image of Toronto’s Union Pearson Express.....Across the street are two trim shops – Trunk Labs and Trunk Clothiers – that sell horrendously expensive travel and clothing items such as the Begg Arran scarf, apparently made from the wool of caviar-fed sheep; yours for €345 (almost $500 Canadian).

On the same street is the little, ship-shape Monocle Café...The Monocle Shop is around the corner. In nearby Paddington, Monocle is experimenting with Kioskafé, a news and coffee shop that sells 300 magazine titles and thousands of print-on-demand titles, including The Globe and Mail.

Mr. Brûlé says the collective revenue for the publishing, agency and retail spreads are about $50-million. “We’re disappointingly small,” he says.
Eric_Reguly  Tyler_Brûlé  Monocle  digital_media  cosmopolitan  stylish  print_journalism  magazines  journalism  entrepreneur  branding  niches  elitism  social_media 
december 2016 by jerryking
How cosmopolitans can win the argument
9 April/10 April 2016 | Financial Times | Simon Kuper

1. Don't lead with facts. They rarely persuade anyone any more.
2. DOn't use elite spokespeople
3. You win arguments by winning over the middle.
4. Talk mainstream values
5. Don't repeat the other side's story, not even to refute it.
6. Avoid "Them and Us" stories
7. Show, don't tell.
8. Don't call people racists.
9. Don't be boring
Donald_Trump  cosmopolitan  howto  Simon_Kuper  logic_&_reasoning  nationalism  rhetoric  buy-in  emotional_commitment  counterintuitive  skeptics  disagreements  argumentation 
may 2016 by jerryking
Britain resigns as a world power
May 21, 2015 |The Washington Post | Fareed Zakaria
"I was struck by just how parochial it has become. After an extraordinary 300-year run, Britain has essentially resigned as a global power.

Over the next few years, Britain’s army will shrink to about 80,000."... Why does this matter? Because on almost all global issues, Britain has a voice that is intelligent, engaged and forward-looking. It wants to strengthen and uphold today’s international system — one based on the free flow of ideas, goods and services around the world, one that promotes individual rights and the rule of law.

This is not an accident. Britain essentially created the world we live in. In his excellent book “God and Gold,” Walter Russell Mead points out that in the 16th century many countries were poised to advance economically and politically — Northern Italy’s city-states, the Hanseatic League, the Low Countries, France, Spain. But Britain managed to edge out the others, becoming the first great industrial economy and the modern world’s first superpower. It colonized and shaped countries and cultures from Australia to India to Africa to the Western Hemisphere, including of course, its settlements in North America. Had Spain or Germany become the world’s leading power, things would look very different today.
BBC  books  cosmopolitan  cost-cutting  cutbacks  David_Cameron  drawdowns  EU  Fareed_Zakaria  foreign_policy  forward_looking  geopolitics  globalization  industrial_economy  international_relations  international_system  internationalism  leadership  London  middle-powers  parochialism  punch-above-its-weight  retreats  rule_of_law  superpowers  United_Kingdom  Walter_Russell_Mead 
may 2015 by jerryking
What's Keeping Black Students From Studying Abroad?
MAR 13 2015| The Atlantic | BRANDON TENSLEY.

The grim reality of this 5-percent problem is that it also excludes blacks from gaining some important perspectives, according to Zim Ugochukwu, the 26-year-old creator of Travel Noire, a digital publishing platform that "creates tools and resources for the unconventional traveler."
Colleges_&_Universities  African-Americans  education  cosmopolitan  globalization  travel 
march 2015 by jerryking
‘In the Light of What We Know,’ by Zia Haider Rahman - NYTimes.com
By AMITAVA KUMARAPRIL 11, 2014

IN THE LIGHT OF WHAT WE KNOW
By Zia Haider Rahman
497 pp. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. $27.
books  book_reviews  novels  fiction  elitism  cosmopolitan  Wall_Street  Oxford 
june 2014 by jerryking
‘The Bright Continent,’ by Dayo Olopade - NYTimes.com
By LYDIA POLGREEN APRIL 11, 2014

“The Bright Continent” resists broad-brush solutions when imposed from outside, and is largely dismissive of the role of governments in transforming the continent. But transformation tends to come when people push powerful institutions to change.
Africa  books  book_reviews  Ghana  Nigeria  cosmopolitan  entrepreneurship  institutional_change  institutions 
june 2014 by jerryking
In Lagos, the 1% Takes Stock
By NINA BURLEIGH APRIL 25, 2014

A burgeoning wealthy class is settling into one of Africa’s fastest-growing cities, attracting designers, world-class architects and a growing creative community that seeks to preserve its culture through art and fashion.
Nigeria  Nigerians  African  luxury  high_net_worth  Lagos  frontier_markets  cosmopolitan  crony_capitalism  The_One_Percent  political_elites 
april 2014 by jerryking
Bye-Bye Barbar
March 3, 2005 | The LIP Magazine |by Taiye Tuakli-Wosornu.
Africa  Diaspora  emigration  writers  cosmopolitan 
january 2014 by jerryking
Sequoia Capital Invests in Berlin Start-Up - NYTimes.com
November 12, 2013 | NYT | By MARK SCOTT.

6Wunderkinder offers a free service, but it charges a premium to users who want additional functionality, like task-sharing between large groups.
Sequoia  venture_capital  vc  Germany  Berlin  cosmopolitan  start_ups  6Wunderkinder 
november 2013 by jerryking
Architect David Adjaye's World View - WSJ.com
By Ian Volner
Nov. 6, 2013 | WSJ |

Profile of David Adjaye:
The promise of those first projects attracted major institutional commissions—including the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo in 2005, and Denver's Museum of Contemporary Art two years later—but it was the 2008 economic crisis that obliged Adjaye to look still further afield and set up satellite offices in Germany and the U.S. "The catalyst for us was the downturn," says Adjaye. "We had to undergo a total restructuring. Basically we had to go big or go home."
architecture  Africa  innovation  design  Ghanaian  Nobel_Prizes  museums  art  cosmopolitan  contemporary_art  David_Adjaye 
november 2013 by jerryking
In Singapore, Building Businesses for the Next Billion - NYTimes.com
By QUENTIN HARDY

Singapore’s tiny size always forced it to look outward, whether servicing foreign ships or assembling electronics for export to Europe and the United States. Now that software is delivered over the Internet and almost everyone has a phone, Singapore still needs to export its business, but the regional market, with an extraordinary mixture of rich and poor, has a lot more potential....“There are over 1 billion people within a four-hour flight of Singapore,” said Hian Goh, a partner at Pivotal Asia Ventures. While that is true of a couple other Asian capitals, he noted, “nowhere else has the range wealth: Singapore’s $60,000 per capita GDP, and $3,000 in Laos. Technology is a force enabler for all of them.”

The expatriate ties are equally diverse, with companies from Russia and the European Union looking for cross-border investment, and individuals from South Africa and Slovakia who were drawn by the warm weather, easy business regulations and high-speed connectivity.

One incubator, called The Joyful Frog Digital Incubator (the name has something to do with “just do it”), wouldn’t seem out of place in the Silicon Valley, except the house barista is more cosmopolitan.

This isn’t to say “there is better than here,” or “Asia wins.” Those responses are increasingly incoherent. It may not be that kind of contest, and for many of these people, even in a state as closely managed as Singapore, the nation matters less than connectivity and what local populations need.

They are building a world where tech travels everywhere, demolishing existing systems and changing societies.
start_ups  Singapore  globalization  venture_capital  vc  cosmopolitan  city-states  exporting  outward_looking 
october 2013 by jerryking
'Heaven was the word for Canada:' race in Martin Luther King's 'North Star' - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 24 2013 | The Globe and Mail | John Ibbitson.

....Racially, the single greatest achievement may have been the decision by the government of Lester B. Pearson in 1967 to introduce the points system for choosing immigrants, sweeping away policies that had kept non-whites out of Canada for generations.

The following half-century of wide-open immigration and entrenched multiculturalism forged Canadian cities so cosmopolitan, diverse and tolerant that they come closer than any to Dr. King’s dream of harmony and equality....

But only for some. Black Canadians make up 2.5 per cent of the population, but fill 9 per cent of the spaces in the country’s prisons, according to the federal Office of the Correctional Investigator. Too many poor non-white neighbourhoods are unstable and, for many of those trapped in them, unsafe
MLK  John_Ibbitson  anniversaries  speeches  Underground_Railroad  geographic_segregation  North_Star  marginalization  1967  Lester_Pearson  African_Canadians  overrepresentation  disproportionality  immigration  multiculturalism  Canadian  cities  cosmopolitan  exclusion 
august 2013 by jerryking
Why Taiye Selasi is ‘not a normal literary lady’
Mar. 31 2013 | The Globe and Mail |JOHN BARBER
Afropolitan Taiye is the author of Ghana Must Go.
writers  African-Americans  Ghana  Ghanaian  women  Andrew_Wylie  Afropolitan  John_Barber  Africa  cosmopolitan 
june 2013 by jerryking
South African Opposition Picks New Voice - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 28, 2011 | WSJ | By PATRICK MCGROARTY

South Africa's main opposition party elected a young black woman as its leader in Parliament, a step to diversify its leadership and mount a stronger challenge to the governing African National Congress.

Lindiwe Mazibuko, a 31-year-old party spokeswoman elected to Parliament just two years ago, was tapped to lead the Democratic Alliance's caucus in a closed-door party vote Thursday....Ms. Mazibuko could draw in a generation of cosmopolitan black voters born since the end of white-minority rule, said Adam Habib, a political scientist at the University of Johannesburg.

But winning their votes will require new policies, he said, such as a strategy for diminishing unemployment, which is unusually high among young blacks. "She creates the potential," Mr. Habib said. "The reality depends on what else the Democratic Alliance does."
South_Africa  Lindiwe_Mazibuko  Democratic_Alliance  cosmopolitan  loyal_opposition 
october 2011 by jerryking
U.S. business leaders finally getting that international feeling
Dec. 10, 2010 | G&M | CHRYSTIA FREELAND...After a century
when succeeding in the U.S. was the surest route to commercial success,
the country’s best businessmen and women have realized that the way to
win is to go global....in the U.S. just 10 % of Fortune 500 chiefs were
foreigners. Now that the American century is over, however, U.S. biz
leaders are catching on fast. A sign of the times was the recent
decision by Stephen Schwarzman, CEO of Blackstone, to move to Paris for
3 to 6 mths. next year...Like Blackstone, GE is moving its chiefs to
where the action is: Last month John Rice, a GE vice-chairman, was
reassigned to Hong Kong, where he will oversee non-U.S. sales, mktg.
& operations....the shift of U.S. capital and American capitalists
outside the country will further polarize an already bitter national
debate. By 2012, Americans won’t just be arguing about tax breaks for
millionaires, they’ll be targeting the millionaires who spend six months
a year in Paris or Hong Kong.
globalization  Chrystia_Freeland  Blackstone  Fortune_500  parochialism  GE  Stephen_Schwarzman  CEOs  leadership  cosmopolitan 
december 2010 by jerryking
Hip-hop barbers break down race barrier
June 12, 2010 | Globe & Mail via Updated News | Joe
Friesen. The barbershop is, paradoxically, a place to congregate and to
remain separate. It's a spot where men hang out and shoot the breeze,
but they often do it in narrowly defined groups. Hair cutting and race
intersect in complex ways, which has meant that black barbershops in
Toronto have catered almost exclusively to clients with an
Afro-Caribbean background. But for a generation raised with hip hop as
its mainstream culture, those barriers are collapsing.....When co-owners
Kirk Tulloch and Lowell Stephens opened the shop near the Eaton Centre,
their goal was to create a different kind of space. In the polyglot
downtown, they wouldn't be able to rely on an established neighbourhood
clientele, so they had to appeal to the cosmopolitan core.
Toronto  African_Canadians  barbershops  hip_hop  personal_grooming  cosmopolitan  hair 
november 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - Just Doing It - NYTimes.com
April 17, 2010 | New York Times | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.
EndoStim was inspired by Cuban and Indian immigrants to America and
funded by St. Louis venture capitalists. Its prototype is being
manufactured in Uruguay, with the help of Israeli engineers and constant
feedback from doctors in India and Chile. Oh, and the C.E.O. is a South
African, who was educated at the Sorbonne, but lives in Missouri and
California, and his head office is basically a BlackBerry....Chris
Anderson of Wired Magazine pointed this out in a smart essay in
February’s issue, entitled “Atoms Are the New Bits.”
innovation  Tom_Friedman  medical_devices  start_ups  entrepreneurship  Chris_Anderson  Uruguay  venture_capital  vc  immigrants  supply_chains  globalization  lean  small_business  microproducers  cosmopolitan  atoms_&_bits 
april 2010 by jerryking

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