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jerryking : detroit   44

Thanks to a billionaire, Detroit is new and improved – but for whom?
November 18, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ADRIAN MORROW, U.S. CORRESPONDENT

Detroit's urban renaissance has also drawn tough criticism. For one, Quicken and Bedrock are accused of building an affluent island in the centre of a low-income city. While Dan Gilbert’s spending has revitalized the central business district, much of Detroit remains economically distressed with neighbourhoods full of boarded-up businesses and burnt-out houses. Detroit’s racial divides factor in, too: Recent developments have tended to concentrate in the whiter neighbourhoods of a city where 79 per cent of the population is black. For another, Bedrock and its related companies have received US$767-million worth of government subsidies and tax breaks since 2010. To some, this is an egregious use of funds when Detroit’s schools and transit system are struggling. Mr. Gilbert’s critics argue a man with a net worth Forbes estimates at US$6.8-billion has no need for government assistance.
Whether Mr. Gilbert is the hero Detroit needed to pull it back from the precipice or an unaccountable billionaire wielding an uncomfortable amount of civic power, his rise represents an extraordinary moment in U.S. urbanism. The rapid rebirth and future of one of the country’s greatest and most troubled cities rests largely in the hands of one man and his corporate empire, which is both animating the metropolis with its workforce, and directly shaping the look and feel of its streets and buildings........the subsidies have been “necessary,” but the city and state have done too little to extract benefits such as affordable housing and heritage preservation in exchange. Rather than a divide between downtown and neighbourhoods, or Mr. Gilbert and community bootstrappers, she argued, all of these elements have to work together.
anchor_tenants  Dan_Gilbert  decline  Detroit  downtown_core  gentrification  hollowing_out  income_inequality  moguls  property_development  Quicken_Loans   racial_disparities  refurbished  rejuvenation  revivals  subsidies  tax_subsidies  urban_renaissance  urban_renewal  white-collar 
november 2019 by jerryking
Lee Iacocca, car executive, 1924-2019
July 2, 2019 | Financial Times | by Kenneth Gooding 14 HOURS AGO
'80s  automotive_industry  CEOs  Chrysler  Detroit  Ford  obituaries 
july 2019 by jerryking
'Black People Will Be Free': How Aretha Lived The Promise Of Detroit : NPR
August 16, 20186:49 PM ET
DREAM HAMPTON

It is important to understand the tradition of black liberation theology, a term coined by James H. Cone, that sought to use scripture to center black self-determination. In Detroit, pastors like C.L. Franklin and Albert Cleage of the Shrine of the Black Madonna used black liberation theology to help a growing black city to imagine itself powerful. They used their churches to launch the campaign of Detroit's black political class, including Coleman Young. At the same time, Rev. Franklin's church remained a touch point for even more radical organizing. He opened New Bethel to black auto workers who were waging a class struggle within a racist United Automobile Workers union. He gave shelter to Black Panthers who were targeted by J. Edgar Hoover's crusade against them. Later leaders of the fractured Black Power movement like the late Jackson, Miss. mayor (and Detroit native) Chokwe Lumumba gathered at New Bethel to form the Republic of New Afrika.
Aretha_Franklin  black_liberation_movement  Black_Panthers  Black_Power  Detroit  obituaries  scriptures  singers  soul  women 
august 2018 by jerryking
In Praise of the Black Men and Women Who Built Detroit
SEPT. 6, 2017 | The New York Times | By THOMAS J. SUGRUE

BLACK DETROIT
A People’s History of Self-Determination
By Herb Boyd
Illustrated. 416 pp. Amistad/HarperCollins Publishers. $27.99

In 29 chapters, spanning more than three centuries, Boyd offers an unusual retelling of Detroit’s past, with black voices on nearly every page. The arc of his narrative is a familiar one in which he traces the transformation of Detroit from a French trading outpost to the world’s automobile production center to a national symbol of urban decline and rebirth. Along the way, Boyd introduces us to some of Detroit’s key social movements: abolitionism, union organizing, civil rights and black power. But this book is not a conventional urban history. Boyd’s purpose is to celebrate the black men and women, the city’s “fearless freedom fighters,” who would otherwise remain on history’s margins.....Today Detroit, with vast sections of its 139 square miles lying in ruin, its black population moving in unprecedented numbers to inner-ring suburbs, its residents struggling with failing schools, joblessness and incarceration, is not a land of hope. Travel reporters highlight Detroit’s thriving art scene, trendy restaurants and influx of hipsters. But those changes have scarcely benefited the working-class and poor black Detroiters who make up more than 80 percent of the city’s residents. There are a lot of reasons to despair about the city’s future. But Boyd remains hopeful.
Detroit  history  African-Americans  books  book_reviews  Black_Power 
september 2017 by jerryking
The Christie’s Auctioneer Jussi Pylkkanen on Working the Room - NYTimes.com
Interview by ANDREW ROSS SORKIN
Published: January 3, 2014

How much do you think the auctioneer affects sale prices?
It’s very difficult to judge, but I think that a good auctioneer can certainly bring 20 percent to the value of major works of art.

Just as Detroit finally seems to be at the beginning of a revival, it faces the prospect of trying be once again be a great city without a great museum. Imagine New York without the Met, or Chicago without the Art Institute. If the DIA is forced down this road, the very collectors mentioned above, from Asia, Russia, and the Middle East, will snap up a collection that has required 128 years and the generosity and foresight of thousands of people to create, and which would likely never be seen in public again.
Andrew_Sorkin  collectors  art  auctions  Christie's  foresight  long-term  museums  far-sightedness  Detroit  generosity 
january 2014 by jerryking
Detroit Goes Bankrupt, the Largest City to Do So in U.S. - NYTimes.com
By MONICA DAVEY and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH
Published: July 18, 2013
Detroit  bankruptcies 
july 2013 by jerryking
Boss Talk: A New Test for Panera's Pay-What-You-Can
June 4, 2013| WSJ |By ANNIE GASPARRO.

Amid increasing competition, Panera's co-Chief Executive Ron Shaich has stepped up spending on marketing, added new menu categories like pasta and developed a vast loyalty program.

But perhaps the chain's biggest recent innovation was opening pay-what-you-can cafes—there are no set prices, just suggested donations—in markets that are struggling economically, such as Detroit and St. Louis. Three years into the experiment, the company now is testing one pay-what-you-can item—turkey chili in a bread bowl—at for-profit St. Louis stores, in hopes the idea will expand to all of its 1,700 outlets....
...WSJ: How has the competitive landscape changed in the fast-casual area?

Mr. Shaich: We were clearly the first people out there in the space. For at least five years, in the mid '90s, my stock was flat. I couldn't get anybody to see a place that existed between fast food and fine dining.

Basically, fast casual is us, Chipotle and Starbucks SBUX +1.09% . Probably between the three of us, we represent 95% of the sales that are considered fast casual.

WSJ: Do you expect a shakeout in the industry?

Mr. Shaich: There's always a continual shakeout going on; this is a dynamic industry. The reality is, what was good enough yesterday will not be good enough tomorrow.
fast-casual  restaurants  CEOs  Panera  innovation  experimentation  Detroit  good_enough  competitive_landscape  menus  new_categories  Chipotle  Starbucks  loyalty_management  shakeouts 
june 2013 by jerryking
Change or die: could adland be the new Detroit?
Feb 18, 2011|Campaign |Amelia Torode (head of strategy and innovation at VCCP and the chair of the IPA Strategy Group) and Tracey Follows ( head of planning at VCCP)...

As the world changed with the globalisation of markets, the transformative power of digital technologies and a shift in consumer demand, the automotive industry and the city of Detroit did not. At a fundamental level, nothing changed. Detroit failed to adapt, failed to evolve.

We have started to ask ourselves: is adland the new Detroit?

Data: find stories in numbers

It's time to reimagine our role. We're no longer solving problems but investigating mysteries; no longer taking a brief, rather taking on a case. Like a detective, we start with behaviour, looking for patterns and anomalies. We assume that what we're being told is not entirely the "truth" so search for information that is given from various perspectives and tend to believe our eyes more than our ears.

Imagine the implications for how we approach data. Seen through the lens of "mystery", we're not simply seeing data as a stream of numbers but as a snapshot of behaviour and an insight into human nature. What we do with data is the same thing we do when we sit on a park bench or at a pavement café - people-watching,albeit from desktops. It's human stories hidden within numbers, and it takes away the fear that surrounds "big data".
shifting_tastes  data-driven  data_journalism  Detroit  advertising_agencies  data  storytelling  massive_data_sets  adaptability  evolution  United_Kingdom  Publicis  managing_change  sense-making  insights  behaviours  patterns  anomalies  assumptions  automotive_industry  human_experience  curiosity  consumer_behavior 
december 2012 by jerryking
4 Lessons for Building a Stronger Tech Economy in Cities - Technology - The Atlantic Cities
Edward Alden
Sep 14, 2012
* Necessity is truly the mother of invention. Over the past 40 years, Detroit has lost almost two-thirds of its population, shrinking from a city of 2 million residents in the 1950s to one of just over 700,000 today, with the steepest drop in the past decade.
* Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery – at least until we figure out how to do it better.
* Cities, even ones that have fallen on hard times, are still cool.
* Rome wasn’t built — or rebuilt — in a day. Diversifying an economy like Detroit’s will take a long time.
cities  Detroit  economic_development  lessons_learned  depopulation  hard_times 
september 2012 by jerryking
Detroit wheel
July 1995 | Institutional Investor | by Hilary Rosenberg who profiles Jay Alix.
* Golden rules: scale down a company's cost structure to meet realistic revenue projections; never attempt revenue-driven turnarounds, which can collapse if the sales don't materialize.
AlixPartners  cost-cutting  cost-structure  Detroit  golden_rules  howto  private_equity  turnarounds 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Weekend Interview with Jalen Rose: From the Fab Five to the Three Rs - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 31, 2011 | WSJ | By STEPHEN MOORE.
From the Fab Five to the Three Rs
After 20 years of basketball fame and fortune, Jalen Rose returns home to Detroit to promote school reform and parental choice.
Detroit  charter_schools  basketball  NBA 
december 2011 by jerryking
McGurn: A Requiem for Detroit - WSJ.com
MARCH 29, 2011 WSJ By WILLIAM MCGURN. A once-great American
city today repels people of talent and ambition.....What's left is the
city so embarrassingly exposed by the census figures, a place that
people are fleeing as fast as they can. Think of all the dysfunctional
measures you can: poverty rates, unemployment, crime, failing public
schools, falling home values. Detroit has them all, and most of its
indicators rank among the worst in the nation.
Detroit  leadership  Dave_Bing  William_McGurn  demoralization  population_trends  downward_mobility  demographic_changes  dysfunction 
april 2011 by jerryking
Black influx impacts school choice in Detroit suburbs | detnews.com
March 24. 2011 | The Detroit News | Ron French and Mike Wilkinson. 2010 Census
Black influx impacts school choice in Detroit suburbs Whites seek other education options as blacks move in
census  Detroit  school_districts  schools  racism 
march 2011 by jerryking
The City as a Problem - Ta-Nehisi Coates - National - The Atlantic
Mar 11 2011 | The Atlantic | Ta-Nehisi Coates. "Given that
Detroit story is now up, I wanted to give another shout out to two books
which really helped me find my way. The first is Thomas Sugrue's The
Origins Of The Urban Crisis. If you have any interest in the history of
cities, this book is required reading....I'd also toss in Robert Conot's
problematic American Odyssey. It's the best overall history of Detroit
I've read.
Detroit  cities  race_relations  urban_decline  racism  gentrification  Ta-Nehisi_Coates  origin_story  public_policy  books  root_cause 
march 2011 by jerryking
What Detroit Can Learn From Silicon Valley - WSJ.com
JULY 13, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By ANDREW S. GROVE.
Vertically integrated production is a thing of the past. Will the auto
industry's new overseers catch on?
silicon_valley  Andy_Grove  Detroit  automotive_industry  vertical_integration  layer_mastery 
august 2010 by jerryking
D.I.Y. Detroit: A Hands-On Approach to Fixing the Auto Industry - Bits Blog - NYTimes.com
July 30, 2010 | New York Times | By ASHLEE VANCE. D.I.Y.
Detroit: A Hands-On Approach to Fixing the Auto Industry. Added
proposed new location for TechShop Detroit. Geeks, engineers and
do-it-yourselfers in Detroit will soon have a chance to take the future
of the American automotive industry into their own hands.
manufacturers  automotive_industry  DIY  Detroit  hacks  micro-factories  small_batch 
august 2010 by jerryking
Detroit Schools on the Brink - WSJ.com
JULY 21, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by By ALEX P. KELLOGG.
Shrinking District Heads Toward Bankruptcy to Gain Control of Its Costs.
A decision on whether to file for protection under federal bankruptcy
laws will be made by the end of summer, according to Robert Bobb,
Detroit Public Schools' emergency financial manager. Such a filing would
be unprecedented in the U.S. Although a few major urban school
districts have come close, none has gone through with a bankruptcy,
according to legal and education experts.
Detroit  turnarounds  bankruptcies  African-Americans  school_districts  public_education  schools 
may 2010 by jerryking
Shikha Dalmia: Dave Bing's Last-Second Shot - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 6, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by SHIKHA DALMIA.
"Our people [city workers] need to understand that entitlement is gone,"
Mr. Bing told the Detroit News in August. "There are people who think
we are job providers. We're service providers."
Dave_Bing  Detroit  urban  unions  public_sector  urban_decline  entitlements  mindsets 
november 2009 by jerryking

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