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jerryking : edward_snowden   18

What Keeps Xi Jinping Awake at Night - The New York Times
By Chris Buckley and Paul Mozur

May 11, 2018

The recently released 272-page book of Mr. Xi’s remarks on “national security” includes previously unreleased comments that give a starker view of the president’s motivations than found in most Communist Party propaganda. Here is a selection.

Winning the Technology Race
The recent trade dispute between China and the United States has brought new attention to China’s zeal to become technologically self-reliant. The book shows that Mr. Xi was determined that China master its own microchips, operating systems and other core technologies well before this recent quarrel.

Taming the Internet
Since the introduction of the internet, Chinese Communist Party leaders have worried about its deployment as a means of subversion and spying. A speech on propaganda that Mr. Xi gave in August 2013 suggested he was alarmed by the United States’ surveillance capabilities that were exposed by Edward Snowden.

Racing for a Military Edge
China has been spending heavily to upgrade its military. In a December 2014 speech, though, Mr. Xi warned Chinese military officials that they risked being eclipsed technologically by the United States.

Hidden Financial Risks
China’s leadership has become increasingly forthright about the need to defuse financial risks from growing debt, and comments Mr. Xi made in December 2016 explain why.

Unrest Over Pollution
Mr. Xi has stepped up the Chinese government’s efforts to reduce smog, soil contamination and other pollution. Remarks that Mr. Xi made in May 2013, when China was in the midst of a smog crisis, showed how alarmed he was about public anger and protests, which Chinese officials call “mass incidents.”
Xi_Jinping  China  China_rising  threats  Edward_Snowden  security_&_intelligence  self-reliance  books  Chinese_Communist_Party  financial_risk  subversion  semiconductors  operating_systems  pollution 
may 2018 by jerryking
Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core
NOV. 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By SCOTT SHANE, NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER.

“These leaks have been incredibly damaging to our intelligence and cyber capabilities,” said Leon E. Panetta, the former defense secretary and director of the Central Intelligence Agency. “The fundamental purpose of intelligence is to be able to effectively penetrate our adversaries in order to gather vital intelligence. By its very nature, that only works if secrecy is maintained and our codes are protected.”
adversaries  data_breaches  hacking  vulnerabilities  counterintelligence  counterespionage  moles  malware  ransomware  Fedex  Mondelez  Edward_Snowden  security_&_intelligence  Russia  Leon_Panetta  NSA  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  cyberweapons  tools  David_Sanger  SecDef  CIA 
november 2017 by jerryking
The promise and peril of digital diplomacy - The Globe and Mail
TAYLOR OWEN
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 09 2015

the same governments that are seeking to enable free speech in countries like Iran are at the same time rapidly expanding the surveillance state. Thanks to the revelations of Edward Snowden we now know how the state has chosen to respond to this new space of digital empowerment. Like a traditional battlefield, they are seeking to control it. To, as they themselves claim, “know it all.”

And herein lies the central tension in the digital diplomacy initiative. By seeking to control, monitor and undermine the actions of perceived negative actors, the state risks breaking the very system that positively empowers so many. And this will ultimately harm those living under autocratic and democratic regimes alike.

The answer, unfortunately, is not as simple as many critics of digital diplomacy assert. Simply returning to traditional in-person diplomacy ignores the global shift to decentralized digital power. Digital diplomacy is a well-intentioned attempt to participate in this new space. However, it is one that is both ill-suited to the capabilities of the state, and is negated by other digital foreign policy programs.

We are at the start of a reconfiguration of power. Navigating this terrain is one of the principal foreign policy challenges of the 21st century.
diplomacy  risks  Communicating_&_Connecting  social_media  foreign_policy  uToronto  public_diplomacy  Outsourcing  Edward_Snowden  challenges  21st._century  rogue_actors  digital_diplomacy  surveillance_state 
february 2015 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Sir John Sawers - FT.com
September 19, 2014| FT |By Lionel Barber.

The spy chief chuckles. “I would not have taken this job if I weren’t prepared to deal in risk, personal and professional. MI6 is in the risk business.”....In future, he says, he wants MI6 to be more agile in response to threats but not at the expense of abandoning the military in theatre. The lesson of the past decade – when billions have been spent in Afghanistan and Iraq – is that a government can be toppled in months but it takes years to rebuild the country. Then again, “if you decide not to [rebuild], as we did in Libya, partly because of the scars from Iraq, then you topple the government and you end up having nothing in its place. And if you don’t intervene at all, you end up with a situation like you have in Syria. These are real dilemmas.”
Spies, he continues, are “normal human beings, public servants doing the best possible job we can for our country.”
agility  security_&_intelligence  Edward_Snowden  United_Kingdom  spymasters  MI6  nimbleness  personal_risk  risk-taking 
september 2014 by jerryking
How CSEC became an electronic spying giant - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 30 2013 | The Globe and Mail | COLIN FREEZE.

Next year, the analysts, hackers and linguists who form the heart of Communications Security Establishment Canada are expected to move from their crumbling old campus in Ottawa to a gleaming new, $1-billion headquarters....Today, CSEC (pronounced like “seasick” ever since “Canada” was appended to the CSE brand) has evolved into a different machine: a deeply complex, deep-pocketed spying juggernaut that has seen its budget balloon to almost half a billion dollars and its ranks rise to more than 2,100 staff....You don’t have to understand the technology of modern spying to grasp the motivations behind it.

“When our Prime Minister goes abroad, no matter where he goes, what would be a boon for him to know?” said John Adams, chief of CSEC from 2005 through early 2012. “Do you think that they aren’t doing this to us?”...Electronic spying is expensive. Keeping hackers out of Canadian government computer systems, running some of the world’s fastest supercomputers and storing data in bulk costs money. Mr. Adams even made a point of hiring top mathematicians, with salaries exceeding his own, so CSEC could better crack encryption....CSEC also has a hungry clientele strewn across the federal bureaucracy. An internal document obtained by The Globe names a few of the customers: “CSEC provides intelligence reporting to over 1,000 clients across government, including the Privy Council Office, DND, Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Treasury Board Secretariat, CSIS and the RCMP.”
PCO  DND  CSIS  RCMP  Treasury_Board  Colin_Freeze  CSE  sigint  security_&_intelligence  cyber_warfare  cyber_security  Five_Eyes  Edward_Snowden  oversight  encryption  mathematics  GoC  intelligence_analysts 
december 2013 by jerryking
Asian countries demand answers over reports of spying from embassies
Oct. 31 2013 | The Globe and Mail |

A document from National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden, published this week by German magazine Der Spiegel, describes a signals intelligence program called “Stateroom” in which U.S., British, Australian and Canadian embassies secretly house surveillance equipment to collect electronic communications. Those countries, along with New Zealand, have an intelligence-sharing agreement known as “Five Eyes.”
NSA  diplomacy  Asian  Australia  New_Zealand  Edward_Snowden  sigint  security_&_intelligence  Five_Eyes 
october 2013 by jerryking
Snowden's Questionable New Turn - NYTimes.com
June 17, 2013, 4:02 pm 52 Comments
Snowden’s Questionable New Turn
By DAVID FIRESTONE
NSA  whistleblowing  security_&_intelligence  sigint  espionage  Edward_Snowden 
june 2013 by jerryking

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