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Globish just doesn’t cut it any more
January 10th| FT | by Simon Kuper.

12 HOURS AGO

Globish: a simple, dull, idiom-free, cripplingly accented version of English with a small vocabulary. .....“What is well articulated in English on the internet becomes ‘truth,’” says Japanese writer Minae Mizumura in The Fall of Language in the Age of English.
millennials  English-speaking  machine_translation  English  Simon_Kuper 
january 2018 by jerryking
‘Uncharted,’ by Erez Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel - NYTimes.com
‘Uncharted,’ by Erez Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel
By WILLIAM GRIMES
Published: December 24, 2013
massive_data_sets  books  trends  English 
december 2013 by jerryking
‘Can You Make a Living After Studying English? Sure You Can’ - At Work - WSJ
June 6, 2013,| WSJ | By Robert Matz

Why study the humanities? For readers of The Wall Street Journal, here are two economic arguments.

...can you make a living after studying English? Sure you can. Students who major in English acquire skills in high demand in a knowledge and service economy: clear writing and communication, attention to detail, flexible and creative thinking.

First, there is the law of supply and demand. Blanket recommendations that college students study a STEM field are obviously self-defeating. If every student were to follow this advice, there would be too few jobs in STEM to support them. We have seen this kind of glut with the law degree.

Second, a humanities education creates a positive externality. You can’t meter the benefits of critical intelligence or imagination, but you wouldn’t want a populace that lacked them. Adam Smith, the author of Lectures On Rhetoric and Belles Lettres as well as of The Wealth of Nations, worried in the latter that the division of labor would make the laboring poor “incapable of relishing or bearing a part in any rational conversation . . . of conceiving any generous, noble, or tender sentiment,” or of forming judgments regarding “the great and extensive interests of his country.” A nation with only technical expertise will similarly lack these virtues.

But can you make a living after studying English? Sure you can. Students who major in English acquire skills in high demand in a knowledge and service economy: clear writing and communication, attention to detail, flexible and creative thinking.

Still, not everyone should major in English. As a teacher in the field, I can tell you that some students couldn’t cut it. The deficits in their writing are too great to overcome, as are their difficulties in extrapolating from the particular to the general, or in thinking about problems in creative or original ways.

But students who can master the English major should feel confident that they are engaged in an enterprise that is valuable: personally, socially, and economically.

Robert Matz is chair of the George Mason English department.

This essay is part of a series on humanities studies and post-college employment.
humanities  STEM  career_paths  Colleges_&_Universities  Communicating_&_Connecting  liberal_arts  Adam_Smith  critical_thinking  English  self-defeating  externalities  detail_oriented  engaged_citizenry  extrapolations  writing 
june 2013 by jerryking
MLA Citation Style
Website
Lynch, Tim. "DSN Trials and Tribble-ations Review." Psi Phi: Bradley's
Science Fiction Club. 1996. Bradley University. 8 Oct. 1997
reference  writing  research  howto  English  citations  bibliography 
november 2009 by jerryking
In the Basement of the Ivory Tower - The Atlantic (June 2008)
June 2008 Atlantic
The idea that a university education is for everyone is a destructive
myth. An instructor at a “college of last resort” explains why.

by Professor X
English  education  academia  writing  literacy  learning  Colleges_&_Universities 
october 2009 by jerryking

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