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On GPS: Epstein on why it pays to be a generalist
Fareed Zakaria, GPS

David Epstein, author of "Range," tells Fareed that people should explore many different fields to get ahead in the global economy of the 2020's.
2020s  authors  books  Fareed_Zakaria  generalists  Managing_Your_Career 
6 weeks ago by jerryking
I’m not calling to revive WASP culture. Just to learn from it.
December 6, 2018 | The Washington Post | By Fareed Zakaria.

The death of George H.W. Bush has occasioned a fair amount of nostalgia for the old American establishment.....provoked a heated debate among commentators about that establishment, whose membership was determined largely by bloodlines and connections. You had to be a WASPto ascend to almost any position of power in the U.S. until the early 1960s. Surely, there is nothing good to say about a system that was so discriminatory toward everyone else? Actually, there is. For all its faults — and it was often horribly bigoted, in some places segregationist and almost always exclusionary — at its best, the old WASP aristocracy did have a sense of modesty, humility and public-spiritedness that seems largely absent in today’s elite. Many of Bush’s greatest moments — his handling of the fall of communism, his decision not to occupy Iraq after the first Gulf War, his acceptance of tax increases to close the deficit — were marked by restraint, an ability to do the right thing despite enormous pressure to pander to public opinion.

But, and here is the problem, it is likely these virtues flowed from the nature of that old elite. The aristocracy was secure in its power and position, so it could afford to think about the country’s fate in broad terms, looking out for the longer term, rising above self-interest — because its own interest was assured. It also knew that its position was somewhat accidental and arbitrary, so its members adhered to certain codes of conduct — modesty, restraint, chivalry, social responsibility.....Today’s elites are chosen in a much more open, democratic manner, largely through education. Those who do well on tests get into good colleges, then good graduate schools, then get the best jobs and so on. But their power flows from this treadmill of achievement, so they are constantly moving, looking out for their own survival and success. Their perspective is narrower, their horizon shorter-term, their actions more self-interested.

Most damagingly, they believe their status is legitimately earned. They lack some of the sense of the old WASP establishment that they were accidentally privileged from birth. So the old constraints have vanished. Today, chief executives and other elites pay themselves lavishly, jockey for personal advantage and focus on their own ascendancy.
Fareed_Zakaria  George_H.W._Bush  WASPs  elitism  meritocratic  self-restraint  The_Establishment  arbitrariness 
december 2018 by jerryking
The country is frighteningly polarized. This is why.
June 15, 2017 | The Washington Post | By Fareed Zakaria Opinion.

in the past few decades, people began to define themselves politically less by traditional economic issues than by identity — gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation. I would add to this mix social class, something rarely spoken of in the United States but a powerful determinant of how we see ourselves. Last year’s election had a lot to do with social class, with non-college-educated rural voters reacting against a professional, urban elite.....Today, everything becomes fodder for partisanship....Zakaria criticizes America’s mostly liberal colleges for silencing views they deem offensive, arguing that it was bad for the students and the country. The same holds for conservatives who try to mount campaigns to defund art that they deem offensive.....Instead of trying to silence, excommunicate and punish, let’s look at the other side and try to listen, engage and, when we must, disagree.
political_polarization  Fareed_Zakaria  identity_politics  gender  race  ethnicity  sexual_orientation  partisanship  Julius_Caesar  social_classes 
june 2017 by jerryking
America is still great — but it needs to stay strong
May 26, 2016 | The Washington Post | By Fareed Zakaria, Opinion writer.

It is increasingly clear that the U.S. has in recent years reinforced its position as the world’s leading economic, technological, military and political power. The country dominates virtually all leading industries — from social networks to mobile telephony to nano- and biotechnology — like never before......Joshua Cooper Ramo's new book, “The Seventh Sense,” argues that in an age of networks, the winner often takes all. He points out that there are nine global tech platforms (Google Chrome, Microsoft Office, Facebook, etc.) that are used by more than 1 billion people. All dominate their respective markets — and all have their epicenters in America: The dollar is more widely used for international financial transactions today than it was 20 years ago.....A better, broader measure of economic power than GDP, is “inclusive wealth.” This is the sum of a nation’s “manufactured capital (roads, buildings, machines and equipment), human capital (skills, education, health) and natural capital (sub-soil resources, ecosystems, the atmosphere).” The United States’ inclusive wealth totaled almost $144 trillion in 2010 — 4½ times China’s $32 trillion.....China is far behind the United States in its ability to add value to goods and create new products.....In the military and political realm, the dominance is even more lopsided. ....And perhaps most important, the United States has a web of allies around the world and is actually developing new important ones, such as India and Vietnam. Meanwhile, China has one military ally, North Korea....The complexity of today’s international system is that, despite this American dominance, other countries have, in fact, gained ground.......“Washington still has no true rival, and will not for a very long time, but it faces a growing number of constraints.” ....The reality is that America remains the world’s leading power, but it can achieve its objectives only by defining its interests broadly, working with others and creating a network of cooperation. That, alas, does not fit on a campaign cap.
Fareed_Zakaria  Donald_Trump  networks  epicenters  winner-take-all  superpowers  indispensable  Joshua_Cooper_Ramo  platforms  books  international_system  manufactured_capital  human_capital  natural_capital 
may 2016 by jerryking
The United States shouldn’t take sides in the Sunni-Shiite struggle - The Washington Post
By Fareed Zakaria Opinion writer

...the most significant trend shaping the region today is something different: Sunnis vs. Shiites. That sectarian struggle now infects almost every aspect of the region’s politics....Though there always was tension, Sunnis and Shiites did live in peace, for the most part, until recently.....The pivotal shift took place in 1979. The Islamic Revolution in Iran brought to power an aggressively religious ruling class, determined to export its ideas and support Shiites in the region.....Saudi Arabia is facing a series of challenges, from the Islamic State to domestic extremists. The country’s large and active social media are dominated by radical Islamists. And as oil prices plunge, government revenue has collapsed, and the nation’s generous subsidies to its people will be hard to sustain. The regime needs greater legitimacy.
Fareed_Zakaria  Sunni  Shiites  schisms  Middle_East  U.S.foreign_policy  frameworks  sectarian  religion  trends  Iran  Wahhabism  extremism  Yemen  geopolitics  Saudi_Arabia 
january 2016 by jerryking
Britain resigns as a world power
May 21, 2015 |The Washington Post | Fareed Zakaria
"I was struck by just how parochial it has become. After an extraordinary 300-year run, Britain has essentially resigned as a global power.

Over the next few years, Britain’s army will shrink to about 80,000."... Why does this matter? Because on almost all global issues, Britain has a voice that is intelligent, engaged and forward-looking. It wants to strengthen and uphold today’s international system — one based on the free flow of ideas, goods and services around the world, one that promotes individual rights and the rule of law.

This is not an accident. Britain essentially created the world we live in. In his excellent book “God and Gold,” Walter Russell Mead points out that in the 16th century many countries were poised to advance economically and politically — Northern Italy’s city-states, the Hanseatic League, the Low Countries, France, Spain. But Britain managed to edge out the others, becoming the first great industrial economy and the modern world’s first superpower. It colonized and shaped countries and cultures from Australia to India to Africa to the Western Hemisphere, including of course, its settlements in North America. Had Spain or Germany become the world’s leading power, things would look very different today.
BBC  books  cosmopolitan  cost-cutting  cutbacks  David_Cameron  drawdowns  EU  Fareed_Zakaria  foreign_policy  forward_looking  geopolitics  globalization  industrial_economy  international_relations  international_system  internationalism  leadership  London  middle-powers  parochialism  punch-above-its-weight  retreats  rule_of_law  superpowers  United_Kingdom  Walter_Russell_Mead 
may 2015 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria: China and Russia set the tone for global stability - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN MILNER
Fareed Zakaria: China and Russia set the tone for global stability
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May. 05 2015
Fareed_Zakaria  China  Russia 
may 2015 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria: ‘We are meant to be engaged with the big questions’ - The Globe and Mail
RUDYARD GRIFFITHS
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 17 2015

Q: How is your defence of a liberal-arts education more than nostalgia for a bygone era of higher learning, now out of sync with today’s hyper-competitive, skills-based economies?

...what’s happening in advanced manufacturing. In almost every industry, basic production is getting commoditized. It’s becoming routine and simple, and most everything we consume, to put it bluntly, can be made by a machine or a factory worker. You can manufacture a $30 sneaker anywhere in the world but, to sell it for $300, there has to be a story around it, there has to be beautiful design, there has to be interesting marketing; you have to understand social media....because product[s]stand out only if you understand how human beings use technology....Mark Zuckerberg says that Facebook is more about psychology and sociology, two liberal arts, than technology...a liberal education provides you with a rounded education in every sense of the word. It teaches you how to write, which I think is the most important aspect, because you learn how to think. It teaches you how to learn. These are soft skills but they’re not lesser skills.
liberal_arts  humanities  Fareed_Zakaria  Rudyard_Griffiths  social_media  Mark_Zuckerberg  education  civics  psychology  sociology  soft_skills  thinking  design  product_design  Daniel_Pink  UX 
april 2015 by jerryking
Can we defeat the Islamic State? | Fareed Zakaria
September 11, 2014 | | By Fareed Zakaria.

Here are a few lessons to think about.
* Don’t always take the bait. In one of his videotaped speeches to his followers, Osama bin Laden outlined his strategy. “All that we have to do is to send two mujahedeen to the furthest point east to raise a piece of cloth on which is written al-Qaeda,” he said, “in order to make [American] generals race there.”
The purpose of the gruesome execution videos was to provoke the United States. And it worked. We have to act against this terror group. But let’s do it at a time and manner of our choosing, rather than jumping when it wants us to jump.
* Don’t overestimate the enemy. The Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL, is a formidable foe, but the counterforces to it have only just begun. And if these forces — the Iraqi army, the Kurdish pesh merga, U.S. air power — work in a coordinated fashion, it will start losing ground.
* Remember the politics. Military action must be coupled with smart political strategy.
Fareed_Zakaria  Middle_East  lessons_learned  ISIS  Iraq  provocations  overestimation  politics 
september 2014 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria: China’s cyberespionage presents a 21st-century challenge -
May 22, 2014 | The Washington Post | By Fareed Zakaria.
...Vladimir Putin might be a 19th-century statesman, using old-fashioned muscle to get his way, but it has become clear that Chinese President Xi Jinping goes one step further, comfortably embracing both 19th- and 21st-century tactics....it’s also worth studying Xi’s speech in Shanghai, given the same day the deal was struck. The meeting was a gathering of an obscure Asian regional group, one that includes Turkey, Iran and Russia but not the United States. His message was that Asians should take care of their own security. ...

...Cyberattacks are part of a new, messy, chaotic world, fueled by globalization and the information revolution. In a wired, networked world, it is much harder to shut down activity that blurs the lines between governments and private citizens, national and international realms, theft and warfare. And it certainly will not be possible to do so using traditional mechanisms of national security. Notice that Washington is using a legal mechanism (which will be ineffective and largely symbolic) for what is really a national security issue.

The Sino-Russian gas deal reminds us that traditional geopolitics is alive and well. Washington knows how to work its way in that world with its own alliances and initiatives. But cyberespionage represents a new frontier, and no one really has the ideas, tools or strategies to properly address this challenge.
Fareed_Zakaria  challenges  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  espionage  Vladimir_Putin  Russia  China  geopolitics  security_&_intelligence  natural_gas  21st._century  industrial_espionage  petro-politics  realpolitik  Asia  Xi_Jinping  statesmen  cyberattacks  cyberespionage 
may 2014 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria: ‘There is a market for intelligent discussion on television’ - The Globe and Mail
JAMES BRADSHAW
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 16 2014

How would you describe the tenor of international political debate on television today, whether on your network, CNN, or Fox or The Daily Show with Jon Stewart?

It doesn’t take much observation to see that we unfortunately do not have a serious conversation about international affairs on television. I think that, in the media in general, it’s pretty high-quality, if you look at print, if you look at the new websites, some of which are really very good. Television, for some reason, has not been able to sustain that. Obviously, it’s different in Canada – CBC, I think commendably, does it.

What’s dramatic is the complete collapse of foreign news in network news. When you look at what NBC was doing in foreign coverage, I wouldn’t be surprised if they had 30 to 40 times as much in the 1980s as they do now. That’s the real drawdown.

Your show gets credit for trying to have sophisticated discussions. Is there a market for that in the U.S., or is your international audience creating the appetite?

We get a good audience in the United States. We don’t get a big blowout audience or anything, but it’s a very loyal audience. We are one of the most DVR-ed shows on CNN, so we are appointment viewing in a way that very few shows are on news channels because news is perishable by nature. I think there is a market for intelligent discussion on television. Television has a kind of haiku-like precision, if you use it well. You don’t have a lot of space – the entire transcript of my show would fit on one page of The New York Times. It can be incredibly powerful, and it’s incredibly exacting.
Fareed_Zakaria  television  salons  CNN  public_discourse  international_affairs  drawdowns  sophisticated  high-quality 
may 2014 by jerryking
Interview with Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg; Interview with Michael Hayden; Interview with Michael Bloomberg
Aired November 3, 2013 - 10:00| FAREED ZAKARIA GPS | Interviews with Michael Hayden

=======================================
Let's get started.

So given those realities I just talked abou...
Fareed_Zakaria  Michael_Hayden  security_&_intelligence  spymasters  strategic_thinking  spycraft  JCK  Germany  leaders  trans-Atlantic 
november 2013 by jerryking
Zakaria: The Saudis Are Mad? Tough!
Nov. 11, 2013 |TIME | By Fareed Zakaria.

If there were a prize for Most Irresponsible Foreign Policy it would surely be awarded to Saudi Arabia. It is the nation most responsible for the rise of Islamic radicalism and militancy around the world. Over the past four decades, the kingdom's immense oil wealth has been used to underwrite the export of an extreme, intolerant and violent version of Islam preached by its Wahhabi clerics....Saudi Arabia was one of only three countries in the world to recognize and support the Taliban-led government in Afghanistan until the 9/11 attacks. It is also a major player in Pakistan, now home to most of the world's deadliest terrorists.... there was no doubt Saudi Arabia was supporting Wahhabi groups throughout Pakistan.


Saudi Arabia's objections to the Obama Administration's policies toward Syria and Iran are not framed by humanitarian concerns for the people of those countries. They are rooted in a pervasive anti-Shi'ite ideology.
U.S.foreign_policy  Middle_East  Saudi_Arabian  Fareed_Zakaria  Wahhabism 
november 2013 by jerryking
The China Syndrome -- Printout -- TIME
Nov. 26, 2012
The China Syndrome
By Fareed Zakaria
Fareed_Zakaria  China 
november 2012 by jerryking
American Dream is Changing | Nye - Gateway to Nevada's Rurals
Oct. 31, 2010 | Nye Gateway | by Fareed Zakaria. What can
you do to make yourself thrive in this new global economy? (1) Be
unique. Try to do something that is a specialized craft or art,
something that is as much art as craft, something that feels more like
artisanship than routine work, things that are custom & custom-made
still survive. (2) Go local. Do something that can’t be outsourced,
jobs involving personal face-to-face contact will never go to India. (3)
Be indispensable. Can everyone become indispensable? Well, no, but if
you learn a difficult craft and are good at it, if you can collaborate
well, synthesize well, put things together, work with others and work
well across countries and cultures, you will have a leg-up. (4) Learn a
foreign language (e.g. Spanish or Mandarin or Hindi). (5) Excel at
mathematics, able to manipulate data, algorithms, symbols, graphs,
balance sheets and all of these skills are the essential skills for a
knowledge-based economy.
Fareed_Zakaria  21st._century  ksfs  indispensable  specialization  local  languages  mathematics  organizing_data  advice  new_graduates  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  bespoke  quantitative  global_economy  digital_economy  knowledge_economy  the_American_dream  in-person  face2face  uniqueness 
october 2010 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria on How to Restore the American Dream -- Printout -- TIME
Oct. 21, 2010 | TIME | By Fareed Zakaria. Job growth divides
neatly into 3 categories. (1) managerial, professional & technical
occupations, held by highly educated workers who are comfortable in the
global economy. Jobs have been plentiful in this segment for the past 3
decades. (3) service occupations, involving "helping, caring for or
assisting others," e.g.security guard, cook and waiter. Most of these
workers have no college education and get hourly wages that are on the
low end of the scale. Jobs in this segment too have been growing
robustly. In between are (3) skilled manual workers & those in
white collar operations like sales & office mgmt.--the beating heart
of the middle class. Those in them make a decent living, usually .the
median family income ($49,777), and they mostly did fine in the 2 two
decades before 2000. But since then, employment growth has lagged the
economy in general, It has been this middle-class segment which has been
hammered.
blue-collar  Fareed_Zakaria  America_in_Decline?  high-school_graduated  college-educated  hourly_workers  global_economy  the_American_dream  white-collar 
october 2010 by jerryking
Charlie Rose - Fareed Zakaria
October 25, 2010 | Charlie Rose | Interviews Fareed Zakaria who
discusses his story in 'Time' magazine called 'Restoring the American
Dream'
Fareed_Zakaria  Charlie_Rose  America_in_Decline?  the_American_dream 
october 2010 by jerryking
Voice of Influence
Oct. 07, 2010| TIME| By Richard Stengel. Fareed's worldview
comes in part from being a naturalized American citizen who was born in
Bombay and grew up outside the U.S. in what was then decidedly the
developing world. His academic background — a B.A. from Yale and a Ph.D.
in political science from Harvard — also gives him a set of analytical
tools that few have. "Most journalists ask the 'what' question very
well," he says. "My training is to ask the 'why.' "s. "I'm not in
journalism to play parlor games with elites. I want to help people
become more thoughtful and engaged about the world." ...Fareed is one of
the foremost public intellectuals of our time. He connects the dots on
foreign policy, politics, the economy and the larger culture to make
sense of the world's most important ideas and trends. And he does it
with a subtlety that is nevertheless clear and accessible. For him,
politics and international affairs are complex and gray, not black and
white.
Fareed_Zakaria  profile  sense-making  foreign_policy  politics  economics  trends  popular_culture  public_discourse  journalism  public_intellectuals  connecting_the_dots  engaged_citizenry  worldviews  5_W’s 
october 2010 by jerryking
Man of the World
May 5, 2003 | New York Magazine | By Marion Maneker.
Newsweek columnist Fareed Zakaria has the perfect intellectual pedigree
(Indian-born, educated at Harvard, conservative) for a fast-changing
world, and the kinds of friends in high places who can push a career
into overdrive. The first Muslim secretary of State? Don’t bet against
it.
Fareed_Zakaria  fast-changing  profile 
october 2010 by jerryking
Globalization 2.0: emerging-market cross-pollination
Oct. 1, 2010 |G& M| Chrystia Freeland. Globalization 1.0:
2-way exchange between west & east or north & south: E.g.
Western companies setting up call centres in India or mfg. goods in
China, China investing in U.S. T-bills, . Globalization 2.0: the
biggest deals & most important capital flows will be between
emerging mkts., without stopping over at Heathrow or JFK. ..Stephen
Jennings of Renaissance Group, a Moscow-based I-bank with ambitions to
be the premier provider for intra-emerging-mkt. capital flows. “MNCs’
advantages (know-how & capital) have been neutralized by an
inability or reluctance to grow explosively in complex, foreign
environments,” “In many emerging mkts. and in an incr. # of industries,
the mkt. leaders have local roots: metals ( Indian), aluminum (Russian),
fastest-growing & largest banks in China, Russia & Nigeria are
domestic.” Yet Western MNCs (e..g GE, Coca-Cola & HSBC) understand
the opportunity in emerging mkts.& agile in adapting to local
conditions.
Chrystia_Freeland  globalization  emerging_markets  BRIC  capital_flows  Fareed_Zakaria  Renaissance_Capital  South-South  cross-pollination  frontier_markets 
october 2010 by jerryking
Zakaria: Rising Powers Aren't Acting Like It -
Sept. 25, 2010 | Newsweek | by Fareed Zakaria. The newly
rising powers—China, India, Brazil—rightly insist that they be more
centrally involved in the structures of power & global decision
making. But when given the opportunity, do they step up to the plate
& act as great powers with broad interests? On trade? Energy use?
Climate change? No. Many of these countries seek deference on matters of
regional peace & stability while pursuing their national interests
even more zealously. Perhaps the most egregious e.g. is South Africa,
which has insists that it is Africa’s natural leader. Yet S. Africa has
been shamefully absent in the efforts to rescue the people of Zimbabwe
and Sudan from the tragedies unfolding in their lands. Says Shimon
Peres, “You can call yourself a decision maker, but if you are not ready
to donate, to sacrifice life, to take risks—not because your country is
being attacked but because peace is being put into danger—then it’s
more of a perception than reality.”
Fareed_Zakaria  BRIC  Iran  Ahmadinejad  Turkey  rising_powers  South_Africa  Shimon_Peres  leadership  Zimbabwe  Sudan  rogue_actors 
september 2010 by jerryking
Be More Like Ike: Republicans should heed Robert Gates
August 16, 2010 | Newsweek | by Fareed Zakaria. "Robert
Gates’s latest efforts at reforming the Pentagon are modest. He is not
trying to cut the actual defense budget; he merely wants to increase
efficiency while reducing bureaucracy, waste, and duplication. The
savings he is trying to achieve are perfectly reasonable: $100 billion
over five years, during which period the Pentagon will spend
approximately $3.5 trillion. And yet he has aroused intense opposition
from the usual suspects—defense contractors, lobbyists, the military
bureaucracy, and hawkish commentators. He faces spirited opposition from
his own party, but it is the Republicans, not Gates, who are abandoning
their party’s best traditions in defense strategy."
Robert_Gates  Pentagon  Fareed_Zakaria  conservatism  GOP  cost-cutting  bureaucracies  SecDef  military-industrial_complex 
september 2010 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria GPS - CNN.com
BOOK OF THE WEEK
The Fat Tail: The Power of Political Knowledge for Strategic Investing by Ian Bremmer and Preston Keat.
The Lords of Finance by Liaquat Ahamed
"It's about how we got into the last great depression, and it contains good lessons on how to avoid this new one."
Science and Government ~ The Godkin Lectures at Harvard University, 1960 by C.P. Snow.
US POLITICS
• "The Inheritance: The World Obama Confronts and the Challenges to American Power" by David E. Sanger.
THE ECONOMY
• "The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World" by Niall Ferguson.

HISTORY
• "The Wise Men" by Walter Isaacson.
• "Imagining India: The Idea of a Nation Renewed" by Nandan Nilekani
SOCIOLOGY
• "Outliers" by Malcolm Gladwell
FOREIGN POLICY
• "Power Rules: How Common Sense Can Rescue American Foreign Policy" by Leslie Gelb
news  media  geopolitics  Fareed_Zakaria  globalization  cnn  interviews  Great_Depression  Outliers  Malcolm_Gladwell  books  Ian_Bremmer  David_Sanger 
april 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: FAREED ZAKARIA'S CAPTION: DO THESE STILL WORK?
February 21, 2009 G&M article by EVAN SOLOMON of his
interview of Fareed Zakaria: journalist, scholar and author of the
bestseller The Post-American World,
interviews  Evan_Solomon  Fareed_Zakaria 
february 2009 by jerryking

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