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Why Is the McFlurry Machine Down Again? - WSJ
By JULIE JARGON
Updated Jan. 19, 2017

Last year, downed ice cream machines became the most common service-related complaint among McDonald’s customers on Twitter, according to data analytics firm Quantifind, surpassing the previous year’s sore spot of poor employee attitudes.

McDonald’s doesn’t break out sales of specific menu items. Research firm Technomic Inc. says McFlurrys represent nearly 14% of McDonald’s dessert items that consumers 18 and older purchase for themselves. Other desserts include cookies, ice cream cones and fruit pies.

Joshua Reynolds, head of marketing and client consulting at Quantifind, estimates ice cream desserts make up 3% of the company’s U.S. sales. “I’m not sure how much of that $255 million is melting down the drain, but we know that’s what’s at risk,” he said.
breakdowns  downtime  McDonald's  Flybits  ice_cream  complaints  Quantifind  fast-food 
january 2017 by jerryking
Leaving for the city | The Economist
Sep 3rd 2016 |

Bill Bishop: The Big Sort

The best book to read if you want to understand corporate America’s migration patterns is not Mr Florida’s but a more recent study, Bill Bishop’s “The Big Sort”. It argues that Americans are increasingly clustering in distinct areas on the basis of their jobs and social values. The headquarters revolution is yet another iteration of the sorting process that the book describes, as companies allocate elite jobs to the cities and routine jobs to the provinces. Corporate disaggregation is no doubt a sensible use of resources. But it will also add to the tensions that are tearing America apart as many bosses choose to work in very different worlds from the vast majority of Americans, including their own employees.
workplaces  Flybits  urban  cities  creative_class  trends  books  geographic_sorting  geographic_mobility 
november 2016 by jerryking
Innovator Under 35: Hossein Rahnama, 32 - MIT Technology Review
Hossein Rahnama, 32
Mobile apps that tell you what you need to know before you have to ask
Flybits
Flybits  mobile_applications  contextual  Hossein_Rahnama 
september 2016 by jerryking
Marketing in the Moments, to Reach Customers Online - The New York Times
JAN. 17, 2016 | NYT | By ROBERT D. HOF .

MOMENTS are having a moment in advertising. Or at least a micro moment.....It is not just a matter of reaching people at a particular time of day, a capability advertisers have employed for decades. Randy Wootton, chief executive of the ad technology firm Rocket Fuel, which recently announced a “marketing in the moment” approach, refers to ancient Greek concepts of time: chronos, or sequential time, and kairos, a moment of opportunity independent of linear time. The latter, of course, is the one his company claims to employ for marketers.

Another key, said Brian Solis, a principal analyst at Altimeter Group, a market research firm, is that the ads need to be more useful than they are attention-getting. According to a Google survey, 51 percent of smartphone owners have bought from a different company than they intended on the basis of information found online.....However, to build brands, an effort that accounts for the majority of ad spending, companies need more than a moment. And few marketers currently have all the skills needed for moments-based marketing, such as ethnographic studies of their customers and the ability to match customer data to the right context,
intentionality  immediacy  GPS  location_based_services  Greek  LBMA  advertising  instant_gratification  purchase_decisions  brands  branding  marketing  ephemerality  impulse_purchasing  contextual  Ram_Charan  P&G  real-time  Flybits  moments  linearity  seminal_moments  chronological  kairos 
february 2016 by jerryking
Category Creation: Building Businesses That Turn Entire Industries On Their Heads | Fast Company
Krishna 'Kittu' KolluriThu Jan 19, 2012

Fundamental, revolutionary innovation--creating an entirely new category of product or service that didn’t exist before, or disrupting a category in a way that completely changes the game moving forward.

Play the Name Game - you have an adjacent category that is well established, the differentiators for your category must be clear. The importance of positioning cannot be overemphasized. How you communicate what sets your business apart must be an integral part of your market strategy, and naming your category--especially in the enterprise space--is a key part of that strategy.

Turn On the Customer Channel - Turn your best customers into spokespeople for the product by making them delighted evangelists for your vision--whether it’s a service, a product, or a transformation within a sector.
Play Well With Others - how do you carve out a niche--inspire, delight and build a loyal following--without inciting the predatory characteristics of adjacent players?

One approach is to create a go-to-market ecosystem that involves key technology partnerships. In most cases, your product will be part of the solution, but not all of the solution. Determine what it will take to build it out, and recruit other vendors who can participate. Form alliances so you can interoperate with those vendors and those products. Create partnerships to leverage sales channels, like OEMs or value-added resellers.

Be Your Brother’s Keeper (Sometimes)- toss around a competitor’s name in conversation. Sometimes it is more important to: (a) promote and evangelize your category than your company; and (b) give a nod to the competition. Why? Because the sandbox is more interesting if more than one person is playing in it.
adjacencies  change_agents  competitive_landscape  delighting_customers  disruption  ecosystems  evangelists  Flybits  game_changers  innovation  market_position  new_categories  new_businesses  Play_Bigger 
january 2012 by jerryking

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