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Opinion | Failing to Decipher Black Voters - The New York Times
By Charles M. Blow
Opinion Columnist

Nov. 21, 2019

much of the Democratic field is still struggling — and failing — to decipher what animates the bulk of black voters. As much as I believe in polling and its ability to uncover information, I don’t believe that the way black people are polled is sufficient and comprehensive.

As I’ve mentioned before, the black vote is multifaceted, like any group of voters. Young black voters see things differently from older ones. There is a slight but statistically significant difference in the way black women vote compared with black men. And black voters in the South see things slightly different from the way black voters in the North and West see things.

Let’s focus here on black voters in the Deep South states, those along the Black Belt, because that’s where black voting power is strongest in the primaries.

Specifically, I’m talking about Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, South Carolina and North Carolina. (I’m from Louisiana, and trying to define the Deep South is a subject that can spark a bar fight. I include North Carolina, while many do not. I do not include Florida or Texas. Geographically they are Deep South, but culturally they are different.)

In any case, understanding the South here is important. ....... people’s relationship to power informs the way they see national politics in general and presidential politics in particular.
White working-class voters in the Rust Belt behave one way because they feel that they are losing power. Black voters in the South behave differently because they feel that they are gaining it......
Southern black voters are in control of the power structure most intimately affecting their lives — local government. However, they often live in states controlled by white Republicans. That is often the most important conflict. The federal government has often been the instrument to prevent or relieve state oppression.

The other thing to remember is that this rise in municipal black power and black self-determination in Southern cities is only a few decades old, dating back to about the 1970s.

Those voters may be less excited by a national revolution because they are living through a very real revolution on the ground. 
African-Americans  Campaign_2020  Charles_Blow  Democrats  GOP  multifaceted  political_power   the_South   voters  
november 2019 by jerryking
Donald Trump’s race-baiting strategy to secure second term
July 17, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Edward Luce.

Telling US-born Democrats to go back to the countries they came from is a departure even by Mr Trump’s standards. In 2016 he attacked immigrants, chiefly Muslim and Mexican, as a threat to national security. Now he is portraying opinionated non-white citizens as un-American. Their citizenship is performance-based.

To Mr Trump, whites are automatically American. Others only qualify if they support his idea of what it is to be American. By any measure, this is textbook racism.

But there is method behind Mr Trump’s nastiness. His goal is to force Democrats to unite behind the so-called “Squad” of four non-white congresswomen, whose radicalism is not popular in the US heartlands. Most Americans are not socialist. Nor do they support paying reparations for slavery, or open borders. Most would probably be suspicious of a Green New Deal that aimed to abolish fossil fuels by 2030. These are the kinds of radical ideas Mr Trump wants to force Democrats to support.
Campaign_2020  Donald_Trump  Edward_Luce  GOP  nativism  non-whites  racism  race-baiting  radical_ideas  whites 
july 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | There’s a Bigger Prize Than Impeachment - The New York Times
By Joe Lockhart
Mr. Lockhart served as White House press secretary from 1998 to 2000.

April 22, 2019
Campaign_2020  Donald_Trump  GOP  impeachment  machiavellian 
april 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Playing the Long Game for the Supreme Court - The New York Times
By Linda Greenhouse
Contributing Opinion Writer

Oct. 25, 2018

Consider two news items from last week that serve to illuminate the current reality. One was the revelation that the Heritage Foundation, a deeply conservative policy shop in Washington that has partnered with the Federalist Society in providing President Trump with judicial nominees, was running a secretive training academy for ideologically vetted judicial law clerks. The foundation suspended the program after the report.

The other was the confirmation hearing the Republicans of the Senate Judiciary Committee held (the Democratic senators boycotted it) for Allison Jones Rushing, the president’s nominee for a vacancy on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Ms. Rushing’s conservative credentials are impeccable, including ties to the Alliance Defending Freedom, a religious-right litigating organization. Ms. Rushing clerked for Justice Clarence Thomas and for Neil Gorsuch when he was a federal appeals court judge; those clerkships evidently accounted for the “incredible wealth of judicial experience” praised by one of her Judiciary Committee supporters, Senator Thom Tillis, Republican of North Carolina. She graduated from law school 11 years ago. She is 36 years old.

How do those two developments relate to each other and to the legacy of the Bork battle? Following Judge Bork’s defeat, conservatives didn’t waste time licking their wounds. They got busy building the infrastructure necessary to accomplish their thwarted goals. The Federalist Society had been founded five years earlier by a handful of law students; Robert Bork and Antonin Scalia, then a law professor, both spoke at its first symposium.

The organization offered the perfect vehicle for cultivating a new generation of young conservative lawyers to enter the pipeline, serving as law clerks by the side of growing numbers of conservative judges and — like Justice Gorsuch and Justice Brett Kavanaugh, both former Supreme Court law clerks — becoming judges themselves.
conservatism  GOP  law  political_infrastructure  Robert_Bork  U.S._Supreme_Court  talent_pipelines  long-term 
october 2018 by jerryking
The Happy Hooker Conservatives
OCT. 26, 2017 | The New York Times | Bret Stephens.

So where are Benda’s conservative disciples today, the ones I remember from panel discussions on the importance of moral character, the dangers of relativism, or the post-modern assault on the concept of truth?.It’s instructive to read the high-minded defenses of Trump offered by writers in Breitbart, The Washington Times, The Federalist, and the rest of the pro-Trump press..Their chief argument for Trump is that he won and is therefore a winner. Their argument against Never Trumpers is that we failed and are therefore losers. What about Trump’s character? It doesn’t matter so long as the Supreme Court remains conservative. Legislative failures are always and only the fault of “establishment Republicans.” Boorish habits are merely a matter of taste and something of a virtue in the era of snowflakes. As for the criticisms from Flake, Bush, Corker and McCain, who needs moral instruction from those sore losers and political has-beens?...Most telling is the Trumpians’ inability ever to utter a whisper of criticism of their man. Even Never Trumpers will occasionally find themselves agreeing with the administration over one issue or another. Not so the Trumpians. With instincts that recall the Stalinist intelligentsia of the 1940s, they mix the logical elasticity of the sophist with the unflinching loyalty of the toady. They are never anything except always all in.

All this suggests that what the media now trumpets as a looming G.O.P. civil war isn’t going to happen. Corker and Flake aren’t stepping up; they’re bowing out. Political retirees are good for leading charities, not movements.
Bret_Stephens  Donald_Trump  GOP  conservatism  character_traits  values  debased  high-minded 
october 2017 by jerryking
Folks, We’re Home Alone
SEPT. 27, 2017 | The New York Times | Thomas L. Friedman.

we’re going through three climate changes at once:

We’re going through a change in the actual climate — disruptive, destructive weather events are steadily on the rise.

We’re going through a change in the “climate” of globalization — going from an interconnected world to an interdependent one, from a world of walls where you build your wealth by hoarding the most resources to a world of webs where you build your wealth by having the most connections to the flow of ideas, networks, innovators and entrepreneurs. In this interdependent world, connectivity leads to prosperity and isolation leads to poverty. We got rich by being “America Connected” not “America First.”

Finally, we’re going through a change in the “climate” of technology and work. We’re moving into a world where computers and algorithms can analyze (reveal previously hidden patterns); optimize (tell a plane which altitude to fly each mile to get the best fuel efficiency); prophesize (tell you when your elevator will break or what your customer is likely to buy); customize (tailor any product or service for you alone); and digitize and automatize more and more products and services. Any company that doesn’t deploy all six elements will struggle, and this is changing every job and industry.

What do you need when the climate changes? Adaptation — so your citizens can get the most out of these climate changes and cushion the worst. Adaptation has to happen at the individual, community and national levels.

At the individual level, the single most important adaptation is to become a lifelong learner, so you can constantly add value beyond what machines and algorithms can do.

“When work was predictable and the change rate was relatively constant, preparation for work merely required the codification and transfer of existing knowledge and predetermined skills to create a stable and deployable work force,” explains education consultant Heather McGowan. “Now that the velocity of change has accelerated, due to a combination of exponential growth in technology and globalization, learning can no longer be a set dose of education consumed in the first third of one’s life.” In this age of accelerations, “the new killer skill set is an agile mind-set that values learning over knowing.”
GOP  Democrats  Donald_Trump  Tom_Friedman  climate_change  adaptability  extreme_weather_events  Dean_Acheson  weather  interconnections  interdependence  data_driven  wealth_creation  life_long_learning  the_single_most_important 
september 2017 by jerryking
What if Steve Bannon Is Right? - The New York Times
Timothy Egan AUG. 25, 2017

It turns out that racial resentment was the strongest predictor of whether a voter would flip from supporting a thoughtful, intelligent Democrat to a boorish, mentally unstable Republican. When you say Black Lives Matter, these white voters hear Kill a Cop. When you say diversity in the workplace, they hear special privileges for minorities at the expense of whites.

So, if you still wonder why Trump would give comfort to racists and Hitlerites, look at the reaction of his base this week. While the civilized world was appalled at his remarks after the hate parade in Charlottesville, Va., a majority of Republicans approved of Trump’s response. Approved.

It’s too easy to write all these people off as racists, for that’s exactly what Bannon is counting on. Yes, there’s a genuine hate-cohort in the Republican Party — neo-Nazis, or “clowns and losers,” in Bannon’s terms — of about 10 percent, which is horrifyingly high....... you can’t bang just one drum. Trump has said demonstrably racist things many a time, from his birther obsession to his taco bowl tweet. He still won, “on a straightforward platform of economic nationalism,” as Bannon noted.

“As long as Democrats fail to understand this, they will continue to lose,” he said.
Donald_Trump  economic_nationalism  Democrats  GOP  grievances  Timothy_Egan  Stephen_Bannon  racial_resentment  identity_politics 
august 2017 by jerryking
The Other Inconvenient Truth - The New York Times
Charles M. Blow AUG. 17, 2017

The GOP's devil’s dance back to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the emergence of Richard Nixon. After the passage of the act, the Republican Party, the party of Lincoln to which black people felt considerable fealty, turned on those people and stabbed them in the back.

In 1994 John Ehrlichman, Nixon’s domestic-policy adviser and a Watergate co-conspirator, confessed this to the author Dan Baum:

“The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or blacks, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”......The policies are the poison.

And yes, this is all an outgrowth of white supremacy, a concept that many try to apply only to vocal, violent racists but that is in fact more broadly applicable and pervasive.

People think that they avoid the appellation because they do not openly hate. But hate is not a requirement of white supremacy. Just because one abhors violence and cruelty doesn’t mean that one truly believes that all people are equal — culturally, intellectually, creatively, morally. Entertaining the notion of imbalance — that white people are inherently better than others in any way — is also white supremacy.

The position of opposing racial cruelty can operate in much the same way as opposition to animal cruelty — people do it not because they deem the objects of that cruelty their equals, but rather because they cannot countenance the idea of inflicting pain and suffering on helpless and innocent creatures. But even here, the comparison cleaves, because suffering black people are judged to have courted their own suffering through a cascade of poor choices.

This is passive white supremacy, soft white supremacy, the kind divorced from hatred. It is permissible because it’s inconspicuous. But this soft white supremacy is more deadly, exponentially, than Nazis with tiki torches.
African-Americans  Richard_Nixon  Donald_Trump  GOP  racism  Southern_Strategy  Charles_Blow  Watergate  white_supremacy  civil_rights  1968  imbalances 
august 2017 by jerryking
A Different Bargain on Race
MARCH 4, 2017 | The New York Times | Ross Douthat.

Instead, the demographic transformation of America has given us a Democratic Party more attuned to racial injustice or committed to ethnic patronage (depending on your point of view) than ever, and a Republican Party that has exploited white racism or ridden a white backlash against ethnic patronage (again, depending on your perspective) on its way to control of the House, the Senate and the White House.

At one end of this polarized political landscape, you have the liberal acclaim that greeted Ta-Nehisi Coates’s case for reparations, his argument that the debt owed by “the people who believe themselves to be white” to the descendants of African slaves is vast and essentially unpaid.

At the other end you have the fears of those white Trump voters who feel like the new liberalism offers affirmative action for everyone but them, allowing immigrants and minorities to “cut the line” (to borrow an image from Arlie Russell Hochschild’s recent study of working-class Republicans) and claim an American dream that they themselves can no longer reach.

These views are worlds apart, but it is actually possible to accept elements of both. It can be simultaneously true that slavery and Jim Crow robbed black Americans on a scale that still requires redress, and that offering redress through a haphazard system of minority preferences in hiring, contracting and higher education creates a new set of reasonable white grievances in its turn.
Ross_Douthat  race  race_relations  slavery  GOP  identity_politics  Democrats  reparations  affirmative_action  bargaining  one-time_events  the_American_dream 
march 2017 by jerryking
The Politics of Cowardice - The New York Times
David Brooks JAN. 27, 2017

Trump has changed the way the Republican Party sees the world. Republicans used to have a basic faith in the dynamism and openness of the free market. Now the party fears openness and competition.

In the summer of 2015, according to a Pew Research Center poll, Republicans said free trade deals had been good for the country by 51 to 39 percent. By the summer of 2016, Republicans said those deals had been bad for America by 61 percent to 32 percent.

It’s not that the deals had changed, or reality. It was that Donald Trump became the Republican nominee and his dark fearfulness became the party’s dark fearfulness. In this case fear is not a reaction to the world. It is a way of seeing the world. It propels your reactions to the world.
cowardice  David_Brooks  Donald_Trump  openness  Ronald_Reagan  '80s  GOP  FDR  optimism  free_markets  fear  threat_perception 
january 2017 by jerryking
No Racial Barrier Left to Break (Except All of Them) - The New York Times
JAN. 14, 2017 | NYT | By KHALIL GIBRAN MUHAMMAD.

The future is no longer about “firsts.” It is instead about the content of the character of the institutions our new leaders will help us rebuild....The U.S. can’t create a more just nation simply by dressing up institutions in more shades of brown. Now there must be an effort to confront structural racism.....for African-Americans, Obama's travails are proof positive that MLK's contention that the content of one’s character would be the perfect antidote to racism is necessary but--by itself--insufficient to heal the gaping wounds of racial injustice in America.....in a post-assimilation America where there is no racial [occupational] barrier left to break, [African] Americans must turn to confronting structural racism and the values of our institutions....Obama's pedigree and character couldn’t protect/save him from the Tea Party revolution, Republican obstructionism, police brutality, voter suppression and Islamophobia.... individuals, no matter how singular, cannot bend the moral arc of the universe....In a post-assimilation America, recognize that institutions are far more powerful than individuals, no matter how many people of color can be counted in leadership. Structural racism is immune to identity politics....history matters. Black people in charge of, or embedded in, institutions that have not atoned for their history of racism can make it easier for those institutions to ignore or dismiss present-day claims of racial bias. That’s because the path to leadership has often meant accepting institutions as they are, not disrupting them.....people of color can inherit or perpetuate structures of inequality. Many institutions of government, finance and higher education were built on the backs of enslaved African-Americans and remain haunted by that history. Diversity and inclusion policies, therefore, should grow out of truth and reconciliation practices as well as strategic hiring plans. Intentional transformation, even reparations, one government agency, one company, one college at a time moves us past the denial and the empty promises....In post-assimilation America, people of color must continue to pursue leadership roles as the demographics of the nation inexorably change. But they must also reject their personal achievement as the core measure of progress and instead use history as a tool to measure systemic change.
Obama  legacies  institutions  farewells  history  obstructionism  GOP  Tea_Party  MLK  leaders  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  institutional_change  identity_politics  structural_change  African-Americans  Georgetown_University  assimilation  institutional_path_dependency 
january 2017 by jerryking
Trump and the Lord’s Work
MAY 3, 2016 | The New York Times | Thomas L. Friedman.

This was a really bad time for us to be stuck. I’m just finishing writing a new book, which is partly about the inflection point we hit around 2007. In 2007, Apple came out with the iPhone, beginning the smartphone/apps revolution; in late 2006 Facebook opened its doors to anyone, not just college and high school students, and took off like a rocket; Google came out with the Android operating system in 2007; Hadoop launched in 2007, helping create the storage/processing power for the big data revolution; Github, launched in 2007, scaling open-source software; Twitter was spun off as its own separate platform in 2007. Amazon came out with the Kindle in 2007. Airbnb started in 2007.

In short, on the eve of Obama’s presidency, something big happened: Everything started getting digitized and made mobile — work, commerce, billing, finance, education — reshaping the economy. A lot of things started to get very fast all at once. It was precisely when we needed to double down on our formula for success and update it for a new era — more lifelong learning opportunities for every worker, better infrastructure (roads, airports, rails and bandwidth) to promote the flow of commerce, better rules to incentivize risk-taking and prevent recklessness, better immigration policies to attract the world’s smartest minds, and more government-funded research to push out the boundaries of science and sow the seeds for the next generation of start-ups.

That was the real grand bargain we needed. Instead, we had the 2008 economic meltdown, which set off more polarization, and way too much gridlock, given how much rethinking, reimagining and retooling we needed to do....It’s clear: Capitalism driven more by machines and robots poses new challenges for both white-collar and blue-collar workers.
Tom_Friedman  Donald_Trump  Github  Campaign_2016  GOP  populism  blue-collar  economic_downturn  white-collar  digital_economy  mobile  recklessness  automation  infrastructure  R&D  smart_people  digitalization  inflection_points 
october 2016 by jerryking
Looking Down on Black America - The New York Times
By RON CHRISTIESEPT. 5, 2016
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African-Americans  Donald_Trump  GOP  conservatism 
september 2016 by jerryking
GOP national security experts join growing party revolt against Trump - The Globe and Mail
JOANNA SLATER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Aug. 09, 2016

among the community of Republicans who specialize in national security, defence and foreign policy that Mr. Trump has provoked something approaching horror. Without a moment’s hesitation, Mr. Trump has jettisoned the main tenets of the party’s traditional approach to foreign policy and trampled on international norms.

Mr. Trump has expressed skepticism about the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, questioning whether the U.S. should come to the defence of its member countries. He has advocated torture and called for the U.S. military to kill the families of terrorists. He has flattered Russian President Vladimir Putin and revealed an ignorance of the basic structure of the U.S. nuclear arsenal.

Unlike domestic policy, national security and foreign affairs are areas where the president can exercise considerable sway without consulting Congress,
Donald_Trump  GOP  Campaign_2016  security_&_intelligence  U.S.foreign_policy  NATO  ignorance 
august 2016 by jerryking
How the ‘Stupid Party’ Created Donald Trump - The New York Times
JULY 31, 2016 | NYT | By MAX BOOT.

There are still some thoughtful Republican leaders exemplified by House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, who devised an impressive new budget plan for his party. But the primary vibe from the G.O.P. has become one of indiscriminate, unthinking, all-consuming anger.

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The trend has now culminated in the nomination of Donald J. Trump, a presidential candidate who truly is the know-nothing his Republican predecessors only pretended to be.

Mr. Trump doesn’t know the difference between the Quds Force and the Kurds. He can’t identify the nuclear triad, the American strategic nuclear arsenal’s delivery system. He had never heard of Brexit until a few weeks before the vote. He thinks the Constitution has 12 Articles rather than seven. He uses the vocabulary of a fifth grader. Most damning of all, he traffics in off-the-wall conspiracy theories by insinuating that President Obama was born in Kenya and that Ted Cruz’s father was involved in the Kennedy assassination. It is hardly surprising to read Tony Schwartz, the ghostwriter for Mr. Trump’s best seller “The Art of the Deal,” say, “I seriously doubt that Trump has ever read a book straight through in his adult life.”

Mr. Trump even appears proud of his lack of learning.
Donald_Trump  GOP  Max_Boot  U.S.foreign_policy  anti-intellectualism 
august 2016 by jerryking
Jon Stewart, Back on ‘Late Show,’ Lets Loose on Fox News and More - The New York Times
By DAVE ITZKOFFJULY 22, 2016
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Jon_Stewart  GOP  Campaign_2016  funnies  hypocrisy 
july 2016 by jerryking
Black Republicans See a White Convention, Heavy on Lectures - The New York Times
by PATRICK HEALY, YAMICHE ALCINDOR and JEREMY W. PETERSJULY 19, 2016

Black Republicans said they had preferred the political messages to black voters at recent conventions, where the focus was less on public safety and crime than on economic opportunity, job creation, support for small businesses and school choice — all issues, they said, that held appeal.

In Cleveland, however, Mr. Trump and Republican Party leaders are focused on appealing to white voters, particularly white men who are critical to their electoral strategy in the Midwest and the South.....Black speakers who did speak from the podium seemed focused more on castigating black protesters, scolding other blacks for their behavior and exalting Mr. Trump than on trying to help Republicans make inroads with undecided or skeptical black voters.....“How we talk directly about a community of people, and how we talk indirectly about a community of people, matters,” said Michael Steele, who was the first black chairman of the Republican National Committee. “Rudy’s not living in their neighborhoods. And he doesn’t understand what’s motivating them.”

Mr. Steele added, “The coding, the language and the wording becomes a distraction.”

Some Republicans said privately that they were uncomfortable that convention planners had tapped black speakers to chastise black protesters in front of a mostly white crowd, which seemed to lap it up.
African-Americans  GOP  RNC  David_Clarke  conservatism  Campaign_2016  paternalism  condescension  Southern_strategy  Black_Lives_Matter  dog_whistles  whites  white_men 
july 2016 by jerryking
The (G.O.P.) Party’s Over - The New York Times
Thomas L. Friedman JULY 13, 2016
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Tom_Friedman  GOP  Campaign_2016 
july 2016 by jerryking
Trump is the GOP’s Frankenstein monster. Now he’s strong enough to destroy the party. - The Washington Post
By Robert Kagan February 25

Then there was the party’s accommodation to and exploitation of the bigotry in its ranks. No, the majority of Republicans are not bigots. But they have certainly been enablers. Who began the attack on immigrants — legal and illegal — long before Trump arrived on the scene and made it his premier issue? Who frightened Mitt Romney into selling his soul in 2012, talking of “self-deportation” to get himself right with the party’s anti-immigrant forces? Who opposed any plausible means of dealing with the genuine problem of illegal immigration, forcing Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) to cower, abandon his principles — and his own immigration legislation — lest he be driven from the presidential race before it had even begun? It was not Trump. It was not even party yahoos. It was Republican Party pundits and intellectuals, trying to harness populist passions and perhaps deal a blow to any legislation for which President Obama might possibly claim even partial credit. What did Trump do but pick up where they left off, tapping the well-primed gusher of popular anger, xenophobia and, yes, bigotry that the party had already unleashed?
Obama  Campaign_2016  Donald_Trump  GOP  bigotry  politics  obstructionism 
march 2016 by jerryking
Jeffrey Simpson: What Iowa can and can’t tell us - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
Why Rubio will likely win the nomination. But for the wrong reasons
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Feb. 03, 2016
Marco_Rubio  Campaign_2016  GOP  nominations  politics  Jeffrey_Simpson  candidates 
february 2016 by jerryking
The Republicans’ Incompetence Caucus - The New York Times
OCT. 13, 2015 | NYT | David Brooks.

The Republican Party’s capacity for effective self-governance degraded slowly, over the course of a long chain of rhetorical excesses, mental corruptions and philosophical betrayals. Basically, the party abandoned traditional conservatism for right-wing radicalism. Republicans came to see themselves as insurgents and revolutionaries, and every revolution tends toward anarchy and ends up devouring its own.
By traditional definitions, conservatism stands for intellectual humility, a belief in steady, incremental change, a preference for reform rather than revolution, a respect for hierarchy, precedence, balance and order, and a tone of voice that is prudent, measured and responsible. Conservatives of this disposition can be dull, but they know how to nurture and run institutions....Over the past 30 years, or at least since Rush Limbaugh came on the scene, the Republican rhetorical tone has grown ever more bombastic, hyperbolic and imbalanced....Politics is the process of making decisions amid diverse opinions. It involves conversation, calm deliberation, self-discipline, the capacity to listen to other points of view and balance valid but competing ideas and interests.

But this new Republican faction regards the messy business of politics as soiled and impure. Compromise is corruption. Inconvenient facts are ignored. Countrymen with different views are regarded as aliens. Political identity became a sort of ethnic identity, and any compromise was regarded as a blood betrayal.
right-wing  David_Brooks  GOP  conservatism  Tea_Party  dysfunction  root_cause  Rush_Limbaugh  radicalization  mindsets  messiness  politics  compromise  rhetoric  listening  self-discipline  conversations  partisanship  political_polarization  partisan_warfare 
october 2015 by jerryking
The Soft Bigotry of Ben Carson - The New York Times
SEPT. 23, 2015
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Charles M. Blow
Ben_Carson  Charles_Blow  Campaign_2016  GOP  African-Americans  bigotry 
september 2015 by jerryking
A Refuge for Racists - The New York Times
JUNE 26, 2015
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Timothy Egan
GOP  racism  Southern_strategy  race-baiting 
june 2015 by jerryking
The Republican field: Get ready for a chaotic and compelling race - The Globe and Mail
PAUL KORING
WASHINGTON — The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Apr. 22 2015
GOP  Campaign_2016  candidates 
april 2015 by jerryking
Capital Journal: Republicans Grapple With the Rand Paul Conundrum - WSJ
By GERALD F. SEIB
Updated June 2, 2014

Rand Paul is, of course, the junior senator from Kentucky and a rising star in his party. He mixes tea-party appeal with the libertarian instincts he inherited from his father, former Rep. Ron Paul .

He attracts some constituencies other Republicans have a hard time reaching—college-age voters, in particular—and is diligently trying to reach out to minority groups that have slipped further from the grasp of others in his party. Indeed, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, an organization not known for its close relations with Republicans, invited him to appear at its July annual meeting, Mr. Paul's office says, though a scheduling conflict likely will prevent him from appearing....Mr. Paul doesn't consider himself an isolationist, of course. In fact, in an op-ed written earlier this year for the Washington Post, he essentially described the debate between isolationism and interventionism as a phony one: "False choices between being everywhere all of the time and nowhere any of the time are fodder for debate on Sunday morning shows or newspaper columns. Real foreign policy is made in the middle...."
Gerald_Seib  Rand_Paul  GOP  U.S.foreign_policy  millennials  NAACP  isolationism  false_choices  constituencies  conundrums 
march 2015 by jerryking
Bergdahl Critics Didn’t Howl When Bush Freed Prisoners - NYTimes.com
JUNE 14, 2014 | NYT |

Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, to interview one of the prison camp’s most valuable detainees, a Qaeda loyalist from Morocco named Abdullah Tabarak. According to multiple reports, Mr. Tabarak had been Osama bin Laden’s chief bodyguard and longtime confidant, and he gave himself up to help bin Laden elude capture shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks.

But when the investigators arrived, Mr. Tabarak wasn’t in his cell. The guards would not say where he was. His disappearance was so mysterious that one investigator took to calling him “the milk carton guy.”

In August 2004, news reports from Morocco revealed he was back home in Casablanca. The Bush administration never explained the release, but, as Jess Bravin documents in “The Terror Courts,” his comprehensive account of the legal — and more often extralegal — events that have taken place at Guantánamo since 2002, it appears political expediency played a crucial role. Morocco had, among other things, hosted a C.I.A. “black site” and interrogated suspects secretly deported by the United States.

Republicans continue to rail against President Obama’s trade of five Taliban detainees for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl
political_expediency  hypocrisy  Obama  GOP  Bowe_Bergdahl  Guantánamo_Bay 
june 2014 by jerryking
Cliven Bundy Accidentally Explained What’s Wrong With the Republican Party - NYTimes.com
APRIL 24, 2014
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Josh Barro

Mr. Bundy, weirdly, is onto something here. The rush to stand with Mr. Bundy against the Bureau of Land Management is the latest incarnation of conservative antigovernment messaging. And nonwhites are not interested, because a gut-level aversion to the government is almost exclusively a white phenomenon.

A 2011 National Journal poll found that 42 percent of white respondents agreed with the statement, “Government is not the solution to our problems; government is the problem.” Just 17 percent of blacks, 16 percent of Asians and 25 percent of Hispanics agreed. In 2011 and 2012, the Pew Research Center found that 55 percent of Asian-Americans and fully 75 percent of Hispanic-Americans say they prefer a bigger government providing more services over a smaller one providing fewer services, compared with just 41 percent of the general population.
race_relations  GOP  conservatism  anti-government  bigotry 
april 2014 by jerryking
James Schlesinger: A controversial figure of the Cold War - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 27 2014 | The New York Times News Service | by ROBERT D. McFADDEN.

* “America at Century’s End.”.....a 1989 book by James R. Schlesinger.

James R. Schlesinger, a tough Cold War strategist who served as secretary of defense under Presidents Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford and became the nation’s first secretary of energy under President Jimmy Carter, died at age 85........A brilliant, often abrasive Harvard-educated economist, Mr. Schlesinger went to Washington in 1969 as an obscure White House budget official. Over the next decade he became chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, director of Central Intelligence, a cabinet officer for three presidents (two of whom fired him), a thorn to congressional leaders and a controversial national public figure.

His tenure at the Pentagon was little more than two years, from 1973 to 1975, but it was a time of turmoil and transition. Soviet nuclear power was rising menacingly. The war in Vietnam was in its final throes, and United States military prestige and morale had sunk to new lows. Congress was wielding an ax on a $90 billion defense budget. And the Watergate scandal was enveloping the White House.........Mr. Schlesinger, a Republican with impressive national security and nuclear power credentials, took a hard line with Congress, and the Kremlin, demanding increased budgets for defense and insisting that America’s security depended on nuclear and conventional arsenals at least as effective as the Soviet Union’s.

With Europe as a potential focal point for war, he urged stronger North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces to counter Soviet allies in the Warsaw Pact. His nuclear strategy envisioned retaliatory strikes on Soviet military targets, but not population centers, to limit the chances of what he called “uncontrolled escalation” and mutual “assured destruction.”........After succeeding Nixon, Ford, for stability, retained the cabinet, including Mr. Schlesinger. But the president and Mr. Schlesinger were soon at loggerheads. Ford favored “leniency” for 50,000 draft evaders after the Vietnam War. Mr. Schlesinger, like Nixon, had opposed amnesty.....In November 1975, after 28 months in office, he was dismissed.

While often criticized by political opponents and in the press, Mr. Schlesinger was viewed by many historians as an able defense secretary who modernized weapons systems and maintained America’s military stature against rising Soviet competition.......In his 1976 presidential campaign, Mr. Carter consulted Mr. Schlesinger and was impressed. Taking the White House in 1977, Mr. Carter named him his energy adviser and, after the Energy Department was created in a merger of 50 agencies, appointed him its first secretary. The only Republican in the Carter cabinet, he was in charge of 20,000 employees and a $10 billion budget......Mr. Schlesinger’s performance was widely criticized. Congressional opposition contributed to his departure in a 1979 cabinet shake-up by President Carter.........James Schlesinger was born in New York City on Feb. 15, 1929.......He attended Horace Mann School in the Bronx and Harvard, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1950, a master’s in 1952 and a doctorate in 1956, all in economics.......From 1955 to 1963, Mr. Schlesinger taught economics at the University of Virginia. His 1960 book, “The Political Economy of National Security,” drew attention at the RAND Corporation, which hired him in 1963. He became director of strategic studies there in 1967.

Mr. Schlesinger joined the Nixon administration in 1969 as assistant director of the Bureau of the Budget, and drew the president’s attention by challenging a Pentagon weapons proposal in his presence.......In February 1973, Mr. Schlesinger was named director of Central Intelligence, succeeding Richard Helms, who had been fired by Nixon for refusing to block the Watergate investigation. Schlesinger's five-month C.I.A. tenure was stormy...... in July 1973, Nixon chose Mr. Schlesinger for the Pentagon job, replacing Elliot Richardson, who became attorney general.
books  CIA  Cold_War  Department_of_Energy  Gerald_Ford  GOP  Jimmy_Carter  obituaries  RAND  Richard_Nixon  SecDef  Watergate 
march 2014 by jerryking
Reince Priebus: 'The Party of Growth and Opportunity' | National Review Online
By NRO Staff
March 18, 2013
Throughout this process both the co-chairs and I have heard a great deal about the quality of our data–and how that affects our ability to target and persuade voters.

Numerous voices emphasized how we must move to integrate new sources of data and expand access to that data beyond the RNC.

Overhauling our data infrastructure won’t happen overnight. But we will move to invest more resources into data collection and management, and we will integrate data into everything we do.

We will lead by example because we want every campaign, group, and committee to make data a priority.

Therefore, as recommended, we’re hiring a new Chief Digital and Technology Officer who will build out and oversee three important and distinct teams: data, digital, and technology. Those teams will work together to integrate their respective areas throughout the RNC and provide a data-driven focus for the rest of the organization. And they will be the new center of gravity within the organization.
GOP  data  data_driven  political_campaigns  massive_data_sets  analytics  RNC 
january 2014 by jerryking
The Tea Party’s Revenge
November 4, 2013 | The New Yorker | by Steve Coll.

McConnell negotiated his party’s late-hour capitulation, and, within days, Tea Party groups called for his ouster. The Senate Conservatives Fund, a PAC founded by Jim DeMint, the president of the Heritage Foundation, which has bankrolled Senator Ted Cruz, of Texas, and other highly conservative candidates, announced that it would finance a Republican primary challenge against the Minority Leader next year, because he “has a liberal record and refuses to fight for conservative principles.”....The Tea Party’s anti-intellectualism reflects a longer, deeper decline in the Republican Party’s ability to tolerate a diversity of ideas and public-policy strategies, and to adapt to American multiculturalism....As recently as 2007, when the Bush Administration almost passed a similar bill, it still seemed possible that a modernizing Republican Party might build a formidable political coalition of Latinos, evangelicals, disaffected Catholic Democrats, high-tech entrepreneurs, libertarians, social and educational reformers, and eclectic independents. Instead, as Geoffrey Kabaservice puts it in his history of the Republican decline, “Rule and Ruin,” movement conservatives have “succeeded in silencing, co-opting, repelling, or expelling nearly every competing strain of Republicanism from the party.” Political purges have no logical end point; each newly drawn inner circle of orthodoxy leaves a former respected acolyte suddenly on the outside. That a Tea Party-influenced purification drive now threatens such a loyal opportunist and boardroom favorite as Mitch McConnell seems a marker of the times.
anti-intellectualism  disaffection  capitulation  conservatism  GOP  Obama  political_purges  Tea_Party 
october 2013 by jerryking
Obama Urged to Resign Over Beyonce Scandal : The New Yorker
January 23, 2013
Obama Urged to Resign Over Beyoncé Scandal
Posted by Andy Borowitz
Obama  funnies  GOP  Beyoncé 
february 2013 by jerryking
The Puzzle of Black Republicans - NYTimes.com
By ADOLPH L. REED Jr.
Published: December 18, 2012

Even if the Republicans managed to distance themselves from the thinly veiled racism of the Tea Party adherents who have moved the party rightward, they wouldn’t do much better among black voters than they do now. I suspect that appointments like Mr. Scott’s are directed less at blacks — whom they know they aren’t going to win in any significant numbers — than at whites who are inclined to vote Republican but don’t want to have to think of themselves, or be thought of by others, as racist....The trope of the black conservative has retained a man-bites-dog newsworthiness that is long past its shelf life. Clichés about fallen barriers are increasingly meaningless; symbols don’t make for coherent policies. Republicans will not gain significant black support unless they take policy positions that advance black interests. No number of Tim Scotts — or other cynical tokens — will change that.
African-Americans  GOP  symbolism 
december 2012 by jerryking
Grand Old Planet - NYTimes.com
By PAUL KRUGMAN
Published: November 22, 2012

What was Mr. Rubio’s complaint about science teaching? That it might undermine children’s faith in what their parents told them to believe. And right there you have the modern G.O.P.’s attitude, not just toward biology, but toward everything: If evidence seems to contradict faith, suppress the evidence.

The most obvious example other than evolution is man-made climate change. As the evidence for a warming planet becomes ever stronger — and ever scarier — the G.O.P. has buried deeper into denial, into assertions that the whole thing is a hoax concocted by a vast conspiracy of scientists. And this denial has been accompanied by frantic efforts to silence and punish anyone reporting the inconvenient facts.
Paul_Krugman  GOP  creationism  inconveniences  man-made 
november 2012 by jerryking
Hope and Change - Part 2 - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: November 7, 2012
Obama  Tom_Friedman  GOP  Tea_Party 
november 2012 by jerryking
How the Republicans Built It - NYTimes.com
August 28, 2012

It was appropriate that “We built it,” the needling slogan of the evening, was painted on the side of the convention hall. Speaker after speaker alluded to the phrase in an entire day based on the thinnest of reeds — a poorly phrased remark by the president, deliberately taken out of context. President Obama was making the obvious point that all businesses rely to some extent on the work and services of government. But Mr. Romney has twisted it to suggest that Mr. Obama believes all businesses are creatures of the government, and so the convention had to parrot the line.
GOP  Campaign_2012  editorials 
august 2012 by jerryking
A New Black Vanguard
February 29, 1996 | Wall Street Journal pg. A18 | by Glenn C. Loury and Shelby Steele
African-Americans  leadership  Shelby_Steele  conservatism  GOP  Democrats  think_tanks  Glenn_Loury 
august 2012 by jerryking
Of Race and Imagination - WSJ.com
December 18, 2002 | WSJ | By SHELBY STEELE.

conservatism, for all its commitment to freedom, did not make itself the principled enemy of racism during the civil-rights era. Here was a movement grounded in the principles of classic liberalism and, rather than rush to its support, some conservatives bent the principle of states' rights into a tolerance of segregation while others simply sat it out....Democracies expand individual rights past the barriers of race, class and gender precisely by encouraging imaginative identification with difference -- by asking men to put themselves in the shoes of women, whites in the shoes of blacks, and so on....
Shelby_Steele  race_relations  African-Americans  GOP  conservatism  bigotry 
may 2012 by jerryking
Portman Could Help Romney as Running Mate - WSJ.com
May 28, 2012| WSJ | By GERALD F. SEIB.

The Buzz Around Portman, the Un-Palin
Campaign_2012  GOP  Mitt_Romney  Gerald_Seib 
may 2012 by jerryking
Magazine - The Holy Cow! Candidate - The Atlantic
September 2005 | ATLANTIC MAGAZINE |By Sridhar Pappu

Mitt Romney, the governor of Massachusetts, loves data, hates waste, and reveres Dwight Eisenhower. He's also the Next Big Thing in the Republican Party. But can anyone so clean-cut, so pure of character, and (by gosh!) so square overcome the "two Ms"—Mormonism and Massachusetts—to be our next president?
GOP  Mitt_Romney  Dwight_Eisenhower 
may 2012 by jerryking
Op-Ed Contributor - Four Deformations of the Apocalypse - NYTimes.com
Four Deformations of the Apocalypse
By DAVID STOCKMAN
Published: July 31, 2010
David_Stockman  GOP  op-ed  Milton_Friedman  austerity  apocalypses 
may 2012 by jerryking
Wiring the Vast Left-Wing Conspiracy - New York Times
By Matt Bai
Published: July 25, 2004 (look at Preston Manning links)

The presentation itself, a collection of about 40 slides titled ''The Conservative Message Machine's Money Matrix,'' essentially makes the case that a handful of families -- Scaife, Bradley, Olin, Coors and others -- laid the foundation for a $300 million network of policy centers, advocacy groups and media outlets that now wield great influence over the national agenda. The network, as Stein diagrams it, includes scores of powerful organizations -- most of them with bland names like the State Policy Network and the Leadership Institute -- that he says train young leaders and lawmakers and promote policy ideas on the national and local level. These groups are, in turn, linked to a massive message apparatus, into which Stein lumps everything from Fox News and the Wall Street Journal op-ed page to Pat Robertson's ''700 Club.'' And all of this, he contends, is underwritten by some 200 ''anchor donors.'' ''This is perhaps the most potent, independent institutionalized apparatus ever assembled in a democracy to promote one belief system,'' he said.
advocacy  belief_systems  conservatism  Democrats  discipline  donors  Fox_News  George_Soros  GOP  grass-roots  high_net_worth  ideas  ideologies  institutions  left-wing  Matt_Bai  messaging  moguls  political_infrastructure  politicians  right-wing  social_movements  think_tanks  training_programs 
may 2012 by jerryking
Watching a once-great party circle the drain - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 09, 201
Jeffrey_Simpson  GOP  America_in_Decline? 
march 2012 by jerryking
We Need a Second Party - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: February 11, 2012

The first is responding to the challenges and opportunities of an era in which globalization and the information technology revolution have dramatically intensified, creating a hyperconnected world. This is a world in which education, innovation and talent will be rewarded more than ever. This is a world in which there will be no more “developed” and “developing countries,” but only HIEs (high-imagination-enabling countries) and LIEs (low-imagination-enabling countries).

===============================
Link to Daniel Pink's work on countries cultivating skills and knowledge that are not available at a cheaper price in other countries or that cannot be rendered useless by
machines. That is, embracing play and abundance.
===============================
See Peter A. Georgescu. "The only way this nation can compete with those that produce high-quality products at a lower price is by generating ideas that build a special relationship with consumers," he said. "Everyone has buildings and technology; those are commodities. The only leverageable asset in the future will be creativity."
Tom_Friedman  GOP  design  imagination  education  high-quality  innovation  talent  developed_countries  Daniel_Pink  high-touch  developing_countries 
february 2012 by jerryking
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