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jerryking : great_migration   10

400 years since slavery: a timeline of American history
Fri 16 Aug 2019 07.00 BST Last modified on Fri 16 Aug 2019 07.57 BST | News | The Guardian by Khushbu Shah and Juweek Adolphe

This article drew on a number of books about the American history of slavery, including The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward E Baptist; American Slavery, 1619-1877 by Peter Kolchin; and Black Is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy by Nikil Pal Singh. It also used census data available online at census.gov.
African-Americans  anniversaries  books  disenfranchisement  Great_Migration  history  Jim_Crow  reparations  slavery  timelines  voter_suppression 
august 2019 by jerryking
Another great migration is under way: Black Americans are leaving big cities for the suburbs - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
CHICAGO
PUBLISHED APRIL 29, 2018

The dwindling of black Chicago is all the more poignant when set against the dramatic story of its rise. Over the course of the Great Migration, Chicago’s black population grew from just 44,000 to more than a million. At one point, writes Isabel Wilkerson in her 2010 history The Warmth of Other Suns, 10,000 people were arriving in the city every month, pouring off northbound trains onto Chicago railway platforms.

Chicago became a capital of black America, enjoying a cultural renaissance that rivalled Harlem’s in New York. Famous figures such as gospel singer Mahalia Jackson, boxer Joe Louis and poet Gwendolyn Brooks were among Chicago’s residents.
Chicago  Marcus_Gee  internal_migration  suburban  crime  black_flight  gentrification  the_South  African-Americans  Great_Migration  Isabel_Wilkerson 
april 2018 by jerryking
Julie Dash Made a Movie. Then Hollywood Shut Her Out.
NOV. 18, 2016 | The New York Times| By CARA BUCKLEY.

Julie Dash’s 1991 film, “Daughters of the Dust”, about Gullah women on the Sea Islands off the Southeastern United States in the early 1900s who are tugged north by the Great Migration, celebrated its 25th anniversary....Along with reveling in the film’s restoration, rerelease and Beyoncé-borne attention, Ms. Dash was recently inducted, to her delight, into the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as part of its effort to diversify its membership....Ms. Dash is still having trouble getting through the door. The agent she eventually ended up with died years ago, and for all her efforts, she said, she has not been able to get another one since.
'90s  African-Americans  anniversaries  Beyoncé  exclusion  filmmakers  films  Great_Migration  Gullah  Hollywood  marginalization  movies  storytelling  trailblazers  women 
november 2016 by jerryking
America’s racial divide widens under Obama’s watch - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 07 2015,

African-Americans are sliding down an economic ladder they had been gradually climbing. Millions of black people who moved north during the Great Migration of the mid-20th century found jobs in bustling factories. Millions more found public-sector jobs – as teachers, postal employees or city workers – as black people took over city governments and congressional seats in places such as Baltimore and Detroit. These workers formed the basis of a black middle class.

But the previous recession hit black people harder than any other group. Manufacturing was shedding jobs before the crash; governments and the post office followed suit when it hit. As Bard College professor Walter Russell Mead has noted, black people accounted for less than 12 per cent of the U.S. work force in 2011, but 21 per cent of postal employees and 20 per cent of all government workers. But with government and manufacturing in retreat, black people faced bleak job prospects.

The new economy is largely a black-free zone. A USA Today analysis last year found that African-Americans occupied only 2 per cent of the jobs at seven big Silicon Valley companies. That’s not hard to understand given the state of public schools in places such as Baltimore, Detroit and Washington, where political nepotism and unions have stood in the way of reform.

Meanwhile, systemic racism in the U.S. criminal justice system – black people are far more likely than white people to be sentenced to jail for minor drug violations, ending up with criminal records that make them virtually unemployable – is so deep as to cry out for a national inquiry.
racial_disparities  Silicon_Valley  Ted_Cruz  Konrad_Yakabuski  Campaign_2016  digital_economy  race_relations  Obama  downward_mobility  African-Americans  public_sector  middle_class  Walter_Russell_Mead  systemic_discrimination  criminal_justice_system  joblessness  public_schools  Great_Migration  sentencing  downward_spirals  institutional_path_dependency 
may 2015 by jerryking
Isabel Wilkerson Reflects on the Black Lives Matter Movement
January 05, 2015 | Essence.com | Essay by Isabel Wilkerson.
Where Do We Go From Here?:

The outcomes in Staten Island and Ferguson and elsewhere signal, as in the time of Jim Crow, that the loss of Black life at the hands of authorities does not so much as merit further inquiry and that the caste system has only mutated with the times.From this, we have learned that the journey is far from over and that we must know our history to gain strength for the days ahead. We must love ourselves even if—and perhaps especially if—others do not. We must keep our faith even as we work to make our country live up to its creed. And we must know deep in our bones and in our hearts that if the ancestors could survive the Middle Passage, we can survive anything.
African-Americans  authors  Black_Lives_Matter  digital_advocacy  feedback_loops  Great_Migration  internal_migration  Isabel_Wilkerson  Jim_Crow  journalists  protests  protest_movements  Reconstruction  the_South  women 
may 2015 by jerryking
Book Review: The Warmth of Other Suns; Fly Away - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 4, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by JOHN
STAUFFER. The Great Northern Migration: Long after Emancipation,
African-Americans found another kind of freedom. Stauffer reviews (1)
The Warmth of Other Suns
By Isabel Wilkerson Random House 622 pages, $30 and (2) Fly Away By
Peter M. Rutkoff and William B. Scott Johns Hopkins, 408 pages, $45
Jim_Crow  African-Americans  book_reviews  internal_migration  Great_Migration 
september 2010 by jerryking
The Great Migration and Isabel Wilkerson book review : The New Yorker
September 6, 2010 | The New Yorker | by Jill Lepore who
reviews “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great
Migration” (Random House; $30); Isabel Wilkerson;
migrants  African-Americans  book_reviews  literature  history  Jim_Crow  internal_migration  Isabel_Wilkerson  Great_Migration 
september 2010 by jerryking
Books of The Times - Isabel Wilkerson’s Sweeping ‘Warmth of Other Suns’ - NYTimes.com
By JANET MASLIN
Published: August 30, 2010
THE WARMTH OF OTHER SUNS The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration By Isabel Wilkerson 622 pages. Random House. $30.
Jim_Crow  migrants  African-Americans  book_reviews  internal_migration  Great_Migration 
august 2010 by jerryking

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