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Did Burnham err in nationalising sugar and rice? –
Sep 07, 2019 |Kaieteur News | by Peeping Tom.

Did Forbes Burnham err when he nationalised the commanding heights of the economy and removed foreign involvement from the local financial sector?.....If Forbes Burnham erred, it means that the socialist experiment pursued by the PNC was ill-conceived. The fundamental basis of the socialist experiment was both national ownership and control of the main pillars of the Guyanese economy, namely sugar and bauxite. If it was an error to nationalise, then the socialist experiment was a colossal mistake........In making a decision as to whether Guyana should have nationalised the commanding heights of the economy, Forbes Burnham must have considered the ability of locals to manage the industries. Did Guyana at the time have the capacity to manage the industries? Was it a blunder by Forbes Burnham to have concluded that we did when we did not? Forbes Burnham was never in doubt as to the ability of Guyanese. ......Ownership of the commanding sectors of the economy had to be complemented by the Guyanese managing these enterprises. Burnham believed this and died believing this.
He cannot ever be described as a visionary if he was wrong on this score, because this was the main plank of his economic policies and his political beliefs.......If today, however, the PNCR wishes to concede that Burnham erred when he nationalised the commanding heights of the economy, it should then ask itself whether in a globalised world, where the managerial demands are greater, Guyanese can effectively manage their own affairs, more so considering oil and gas will be a major contributor to economic growth over the next 40 years.
It is posited that if Burnham erred by overestimating the local capacity to manage the bauxite and sugar industries, then is it safe to say that Guyanese will be unable to cope with an oil economy.
economic_development  economic_stagnation  Guyana  Guyanese  history  ineptitude  LFSB  nationalizations  oil_industry  PNC 
september 2019 by jerryking
The Arts in the 90s –
May 28, 2008 | Stabroek News | By Barrington Braithwaite.
'90s  art  art_galleries  artists  creative_class  culture  dance  drama  Guyana  Guyanese  history  nostalgia  playwrights 
may 2019 by jerryking
Guyanese Chicken & Salted Meat Cook-Up Rice Recipe
By Cynthia Nelson Updated 11/04/18

Ingredients
3 pounds chicken (cut into large pieces; drumsticks, thighs, and wings)
+ 1 lb corned beef brisket or salted pigtail cut into bite sized pieces(you can use regular beef also)
salt to taste
black pepper to taste
2 teaspoons canola oil or other neutral oil
1 cup onions (diced, divided equally)
4 sprigs thyme (divided equally)
1 cup black-eyed peas (dried, or dried peas of your choice, soaked overnight)
4 cups coconut milk (fresh or substitute with 2 cups canned coconut milk and 2 cups water)/1 13 oz can coconut milk
2 cups rice (long-grain, parboiled, washed and drained)
10 large basil leaves (sweet, torn)
1/2 cup tomatoes (diced), tomato paste
2 green onions (sliced thinly; white and green parts)
+ pumpkin, spinach and ochroes
+ approximately 5 cups water

Pressurize the black-eye peas; don't use oxtail--too bony. Try salt beef instead or the meat recommended in the recipe.
chicken  Guyanese  one-pot  recipes  rice 
december 2018 by jerryking
The APNU+AFC Govt. and African Guyanese: After three years, no major Policy Initiative that targets Black Empowerment – Kaieteur News
May 13, 2018 | | Hinds' Sight with Dr. David Hinds.

Many African Guyanese believe that any criticism of this APNU+AFC government, especially by one of their own, is sinful. This is the very attitude that was exhibited by many Indian Guyanese when the PPP held office and which African Guyanese found revolting. But now, with their government in power, African Guyanese are behaving in the same manner. This hypocrisy by our ethnic communities is at the root of Guyana’s failure to move from the backward politics of colonial domination to a more enlightened politics that embrace equality of opportunity and national consensus as guiding principles. And this failure has impeded economic liberation from poverty and want, and kept us a poor, underdeveloped country.......Most African Guyanese live in the urban areas and in ancestral villages. But these spaces are hardly hubs of economic opportunities. Three years after its assumption of office, there is still no comprehensive Urban and Village renewal initiative. Many African Guyanese villages and communities don’t have markets, for example. Hence, there is little money circulation in those communities.
I know there are many who would say that Village and Urban Renewal are not government business. I beg to disagree. The poor state of those communities is a direct result of government policies, so the repair job must be initiated by government policy.
Afro-Guyanese  African_Guyanese_villages  David_Hinds  disempowerment  economic_empowerment  economic_development  economic_dynamism  economically_disadvantaged  equality_of_opportunity  ethnic_communities  Guyana  Guyanese  institutions  politics  revitalization 
may 2018 by jerryking
We cannot win if we do not like each other
May 6 2018 | Sunday Stabroek | by Ian McDonald.

When I was a schoolboy we had a games-master named Mr. Wilkinson who had served the College for all eternity. I suppose he must have been in his fi...
Guyana  Guyanese  partisanship  national_unity  factionalism  dissension  ethnic_divisions  politics  intolerance  incivility  mistrust  personal_animosity  personal_invective 
may 2018 by jerryking
Sir Wilson Harris obituary | Books
Fri 9 Mar 2018 | The Guardian | Michael Mitchell

16.13 GMT Last modified on Sun 11 Mar 2018 11.28 GMT
obituaries  Guyanese  Guyana  Afro-Guyanese  writers  authors  Wilson_Harris 
march 2018 by jerryking
The Last Ship: Jan Lowe Shinebourne: 9781845232467: Literature: Amazon Canada
For Joan Wong, growing up in a Chinese family in the political turmoil of 1960s Guyana, family history is never straightforward. There are the examples of her grandmothers - Clarice Chung, iron-willed matriarch who has ensured the family's survival through unremitting toil, with her pride in maintaining racial and cultural identity, and Susan Leo, whose failures have shamed the family, who found comfort from harsh poverty in relationships with two Indian men and adopting an Indian life-style. Later, when Joan Wong makes her own pilgrimage to ancestral China at the turn of the twenty-first century, there are surprises in store.
ancestry  books  Chinese  cultural_identity  Diaspora  Guyanese  history  homecoming  pilgrimage 
february 2018 by jerryking
The absolute need to raise all standards - Stabroek News
By IAN MCDONALD November 27, 2016

the determination to give a proper account of your stewardship, the satisfaction obtained in doing a job meticulously and well and on time, a concern to maintain high standards of service, accountability and professionalism. Any society should hope that such attitudes never become out of date.
Guyanese  Guyana  detail_oriented  quality  stewardship  civility  standards  on-time 
december 2016 by jerryking
A beloved tutor and social administrator Sheila George, MS, is a ‘Special Person’ – Kaieteur News
Nov 28, 2010 News 0 Comments




Mme. Sheila George

“I think you just have to do the best you can wherever you are.”

By Crystal Conway
BHS  teachers  Guyanese  Guyana 
july 2016 by jerryking
Wealth transforms and strengthens one’s position in the political process -
November 19, 2009 | Stabroek News| F. Skinner

My theory is to train our people to be able to develop themselves regardless of the party in power. I noted that even after 28 years of PNC rule, generally, our social development did not show positive trends. Dr Jagan warned about the danger of our dependence on government jobs. My brand of social activism is about changing a mindset, which is amplified by some responses to my last letter.
Cheddi_Jagan  letters_to_the_editor  entrepreneurship  Afro-Guyanese  Guyanese  wealth_creation  generational_wealth 
june 2016 by jerryking
Africans were pioneers in business in Guyana
January 12, 2010 | Stabroek News | F. Skinner.

Africans are the pioneers of the majority of business trends and innovations in Guyana, but there is hardly any tangible proof of this. Their ideas were worked and developed only to change hands with no royalties attached. ...Mr King identified many problems/obstacles facing the African businessman. He pointed out that if an Indian is a barber his son and even grandson are destined to be barbers. Next, the lack of other rich African businessmen to turn to for support – financial or business advice – when the banks and your competitors gang up against you.....He discussed the proposition with his closest friends and was asked, “What you gon do wid all that property?” He admitted that it was not that his friends were deliberately giving him bad advice, it was that they simply did not know and he was no different. He regretted the missed opportunity because a few years later one year’s rental of a small section on the ground floor would have paid for the entire property at the time....They ran into financial problems and got some assistance from the government, which was not enough. Which African organization could they have turned to for financial assistance? The same can be said about another three who had the stone quarry....All the persons mentioned were out there with their shoulders to the wheel. There are reasons for their failures. We must identify these reasons and address them as a community. Glaring though is the lack of a support system in the community.
We must accept that we must generate wealth and not just depend on education, a salaried job or a government. We must be able to be trustworthy to each other. We must stop this individualist approach to business. One ‘pointer’ can’t sweep. Our foreparents trusted each other enough to form co-ops and bought land.
Afro-Guyanese  small_business  history  '70s  entrepreneurship  letters_to_the_editor  Guyanese  trailblazers  trustworthiness  advice  pioneers  missed_opportunities  regrets  support_systems  challenges  wealth_creation  failure  post-mortems  disunity 
june 2016 by jerryking
ATTENTION TO DETAIL by Dave Martins and The... - Dave Martins and The Tradewinds
the two biggest concerns for me are, in macro, the Indian/black ethnic division, and, in micro, the widespread tendency to accept or even encourage the sub-standard. For someone who has lived in the developed world, for two or three decades, that discinclination or disability to pay attention to detail in the various aspects of our life, is a jolt, and adjusting to that difference is very difficult because it confronts one daily. ....It is a detail, but we don’t seem to have yet understood in Guyana that the difference between good and excellent is always, absolutely always, in the details. Here, we praise the overall structure and seem oblivious to the pieces left hanging.
More pivotally, the lack is across the board. It is not just in the things we build. It is in the presentations we give, in the shows we stage, even in the way we drive. It is rampant in the media. Without fail, every day, there are punctuation errors, or declensions wrong, or verb/subject disagreements in our newspapers, and the lack of attention to detail in how we say what we say infects the broadcast media as well..... A friend of mine, with an awareness of the problem, says that this lack of attention to detail is now part of our cultural make-up; it is a condition of who we are and what we are. It is Guyana’s sociology in 2013. Cynical as that may be, it is a contention to consider....
Guyanese  Guyana  politics  limitations  detail_oriented  ethnic_divisions  quality  standards  substandard  developed_countries  Dave_Martins  shortcomings  developing_countries  pay_attention 
december 2015 by jerryking
Granger addressed a matter of importance to all Guyanese - Stabroek News
By
Staff Writer
August 12, 2015

Pesident Granger’s position at the forum: “salaried employment is very seductive … You can spend out your whole salary because you know next month you will get another salary. If you are a farmer you need to save money for fertilizer, seed, equipment, if there is a drought or a flood you need savings to tide you over but if you are a policeman and there’s a flood you still get paid. Some people do not like to take risks but …unless you change the economy, unless we create people who are entrepreneurs, manufacturers, we will always be victims of people who make decisions for us.”
Afro-Guyanese  cultural_values  David_Granger  economic_development  Guyana  Guyanese  entrepreneurship  Indo-Guyanese  manufacturers  psyche_of_dependency  risk-taking 
august 2015 by jerryking
My country is what it is because…
JULY 13, 2014 | BY KNEWS | Adam Harris.

Ever since a friend loaned me the book ‘From Third World to First—The Singapore Story: 1965-2000’ I have been looking at my country with a range of emotions. I have felt anger, pity, sorrow, disappointment and shame….Last week, I read a news report prepared by one of my reporters. Using information supplied by the Indian Arrival Committee (IAC) – who culled statistics from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) database and some other international sources – it was concluded that Guyana is 254 years behind Singapore….The economic policies of that Asian giant boggled my mind. For one, its leader bought foreign talent when the country had none, but there was a caveat. For every two foreigners there needed to be one Singaporean. There was no attempt to get the foreigner to pay a bribe….The strange thing is that we have examples to follow; instead we have opted to do our own thing. The result is stagnation and a people who merely want to leave the country by any means possible. In this day and age we have skilled Guyanese running to other countries to peddle their ability.
Singapore  Guyana  Guyanese  Lee_Kuan_Yew  books  city-states  disappointment  economic_development  economic_stagnation 
july 2015 by jerryking
Clive Thomas: Thank you for the revolution : Kaieteur News
April 6, 2014 | By KNews | Filed Under Features / Columnists, Freddie Kissoon
economists  Guyanese 
april 2014 by jerryking
Lives Lived: Clarence Anthony Nichols, 70 - The Globe and Mail
The Nichols family

Contributed to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jan. 31 2014
obituaries  Guyanese  African_Canadians  Afro-Guyanese 
february 2014 by jerryking
As my father used to say, ‘Adeh, maan… adeh’
September 5, 2012 | Indo Caribbean World | Bernard Heydorn.

Creole language
Guyanese  languages 
september 2012 by jerryking
Who are our heroes?
September 1, 2012 | Stabroek News | editorials.

Time and again, since the birth of our nation, we have shown ourselves to be susceptible to hero worship, to the cult of personality. We have an adolescent’s urge to revere (or revile) our political leaders where a healthy dose of scepticism and an appropriate measure of deference would serve us rather better. It is time to outgrow these teenage-style crushes. Ours is a complex country in need of complex characters to illuminate a path for us to tread.
leaders  leadership  heroes  Guyana  Guyanese  skepticism  personality_cults 
september 2012 by jerryking
No forward thinking - Stabroek News - Guyana
No forward thinking
By Stabroek staff | 5 Comments | Editorial | Thursday, July 19, 2012
Guyanese 
august 2012 by jerryking
Troubles Demand Political Maturity
July 25, 2012 | Caribbean Graphic | Sir Ronald Sanders
Guyana  politics  history  Guyanese 
august 2012 by jerryking
'Orealla' a feat of historical reconstruction
August 1, 2012 | A book review by Frank Birbalsingh of 'Orealla' a feat of historical reconstruction

Roy Heath, Orealla, London, Allison and Busby Limited, 1984, pp.255
ISBN 0-85031-528-X
book_reviews  Guyanese  Guyana  historical_fiction 
august 2012 by jerryking
Tastes Like Home - Stabroek News - Guyana
By Cynthia Nelson | 2 Comments | The Scene | Saturday, August 23, 2008
recipes  Cynthia_Nelson  Guyanese  seasonings  condiments 
february 2012 by jerryking
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