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Opinion | Why Harvard Was Wrong to Make Me Step Down
June 24, 2019 | The New York Times | By Ronald S. Sullivan Jr., Mr. Sullivan is a law professor at Harvard Law School.

In May, Harvard College announced that it would not renew the appointment of me and my wife, Stephanie Robinson, as faculty deans of Winthrop House, one of Harvard’s undergraduate residential houses, because I am one of the lawyers who represented the Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein in advance of his coming sexual assault trial. The administration’s decision followed reports by some students that they felt “unsafe” in an institution led by a lawyer who would take on Mr. Weinstein as a client.

I am willing to believe that some students felt unsafe. But feelings alone should not drive university policy. Administrators must help students distinguish between feelings that have a rational basis and those that do not. In my case, Harvard missed an opportunity to help students do that......I would hope that any student who felt unsafe as a result of my representation of Mr. Weinstein might, after a reasoned discussion of the relevant facts, question whether his or her feelings were warranted. But Harvard was not interested in having that discussion. Nor was Harvard interested in facilitating conversations about the appropriate role of its faculty in addressing sexual violence and the tension between protecting the rights of the criminally accused and treating survivors of sexual violence with respect.

Instead, the administration capitulated to protesters. Given that universities are supposed to be places of considered and civil discourse, where people are forced to wrestle with difficult, controversial and unfamiliar ideas, this is disappointing......reasoned discourse lost out to raw feelings......I am not opposed to student protest. Many important social justice movements began with student protests, including movements from which I, as an African-American, have benefited. Had it not been for students who staged sit-ins at lunch counters, I would not have had the opportunity to be trained at Harvard Law School.

But I am profoundly troubled by the reaction of university administrators who are in charge of student growth and development. The job of a teacher is to help students think through what constitutes a reasonable argument. It is a dereliction of duty for administrators to allow themselves to be bullied into ..Unchecked emotion has replaced thoughtful reasoning on campus. Feelings are no longer subjected to evidence, analysis or empirical defense. Angry demands, rather than rigorous arguments, now appear to guide university policy.
African-Americans  bullying  capitulation  Colleges_&_Universities  critical_thinking  firings  gut_feelings  Harvard  Harvey_Weinstein  HLS  intolerance  logic_&_reasoning  missed_opportunities  op-ed  policymaking  political_correctness  professors  protests  students 
june 2019 by jerryking
Merck C.E.O. Ken Frazier on Death Row Cases and the Corporate Soul - The New York Times
By David Gelles

March 9, 2018

How do you prioritize your time?

There are three things that the C.E.O. should be focused on. Number one is that sense of purpose and direction that the company needs, making sure that that’s always clear and people know what we’re all about. The second thing is capital allocation. We only have so many resources. Making sure that you’re putting those resources where you have the greatest opportunity. And the third, which I think by far is the most important, is to make sure that you have the right people in the most important jobs inside the company.
African-Americans  capital_allocation  CEOs  death_row  Kenneth_Frazier  HLS  lawyers  Merck  new_graduates  pharmaceutical_industry  priorities  purpose  resource_allocation  talent_acquisition  think_threes  the_right_people 
march 2018 by jerryking
William Coleman Fought Civil-Rights Battles From the Inside - WSJ
William T. Coleman Jr. graduated at the top of his Harvard Law School class, served in President Gerald Ford’s cabinet as transportation secretary, argued 19 cases before the Supreme Court and was a director of companies including International Business Machines Corp. and PepsiCo Inc. He was one of the few blacks of his generation to become a top-level insider in business and government.

In his later years, he also was frustrated that American schools and neighborhoods remained largely segregated. “We underestimated the complexity of achieving sustained integration,” he wrote in his 2010 memoir, “Counsel for the Situation.”

He shunned extreme language. “You accomplish things by being in the room when the deal is made, and it’s just not in your interest to take positions where you’re not going to get in the room,” he said in an oral history.....He relished legal problem-solving, and it allowed him to live well. Blue-chip companies “pay me a hell of a lot of money to tell them what to do and what not to do,” he said in an interview with the National Visionary Leadership Project. He also remained active in civil rights.
African-Americans  lawyers  Harvard  '70s  NAACP  memoirs  books  obituaries  civil_rights  segregation  desegregation  problem_solving  cabinets  HLS  blue-chips 
april 2017 by jerryking
Harvard Law, Moving to Diversify Applicant Pool, Will Accept GRE Scores - The New York Times
By ELIZABETH OLSON MARCH 8, 2017

Harvard Law School, moving to open its doors to a larger, more diverse pool of applicants, said on Wednesday that it would accept the graduate record examination, known as the GRE, for the admission of students entering its fall 2018 class.

The law school, whose alumni include senators, chief executives, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and President Barack Obama, is the second accredited law school in the United States to accept the GRE for admission. It follows the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, which made the change a year ago.

At the time, Arizona’s decision provoked a heated debate in the legal profession, which has long supported the Law School Admissions Test, or LSAT, over whether that test should be relied on as a single valid predictor of law school success.

Since Arizona’s move, around 150 law school deans, including Martha Minow of Harvard Law, have expressed support for the change. Now Harvard Law is taking the same step. The school said it would start a pilot program in the fall, when students begin submitting applications for the three-year juris doctor program that begins in 2018.

The change “will encourage more students in the United States and internationally from a greater degree of disciplines to apply,” said Jessica Soban, assistant dean and chief admissions officer. Applicants who want to can still submit LSAT scores.
Harvard  law_schools  diversity  applicants  standardized_testing  HLS  pilot_programs 
march 2017 by jerryking
Harvard Law School Can Learn From MOOCs -
Harvard Law School Can Learn From MOOCs
Apr 11, 2013 Bloomberg By Raja Bobbili & Daniel Doktori
law_schools  MOOCs  Harvard  law_students  HLS 
april 2013 by jerryking
Role Models
May 26, 1990 | The Economist pg. 46 |

The school claims to be recruiting hard: the trouble is that there are few black lawyers who want to do teaching jobs. It is only fairly recently that large numbers of blacks have attended the better law schools, and the brightest of them tend to become practising lawyers. A degree from a law school opens many doors, and a career in teaching is less likely to appeal to black graduates, relatively few of whom come from wealthy families.

The law school's contention that it is looking but not finding is not accepted by Mr Bell and his allies. It is looking for the wrong son of people, they answer: the school should look beyond “Gucci" candidates from an elite law school.

But Harvard is not alone in finding it to recruit black teachers. An American Council on Education survey, released last summer, indicated that eight out often colleges were making some sort of effort to hire more teachers from minority groups. Their effort is unlikely to lead to much in the way of results. The problem is simple: the demand is great but the supply of qualified blacks and Hispanics is limited.

Asians are another story. Although there are six times as many blacks as Asians in the United States, Asians got mine as as blacks in 1988. Relatively few black Americans go to college and only about a third of the students who do go are working in fields that are likely to lead to a graduate school of arts or sciences.

The push for a diverse faculty rests on the notion that black students, at all levels, need role models: teachers who are also black. This may be a tenable argument for schoolchildren: black children need to know that blacks can excel (and girls, of all colours, need to see that women can become doctors and astronauts). But the argument cannot be sustained at university level, where it may well lead to tokenism and lowering of standards. And role models, after all, come in all colours.
academia  African-Americans  children  Colleges_&_Universities  Derrick_Bell  diversity  Harvard  HLS  law_schools  professors  role_models  talent_pipelines  tokenism  women 
august 2012 by jerryking
Big Law Firms Try New Idea: The True CEO - WSJ.com
JANUARY 22, 2007 | WSJ |By NATHAN KOPPEL
Big Law Firms Try New Idea: The True CEO
New Style of Leader Focuses On Managing Business -- Leaving Others to Log Billable Hours

Orrick Chairman Ralph Baxter Jr. hasn't practiced law since 1992. He spends his days traveling to the firm's 18 offices world-wide, scouting lawyers and other law firms, meeting with clients and communicating with colleagues. He holds quarterly town-hall meetings via videoconference for Orrick's roughly 1,000 lawyers and sends out informational Webcasts more frequently.

As law firms have grown larger and more global in recent decades, more have followed Orrick's path. Their leaders increasingly resemble public-company CEOs, focused on managing others at the firm. Other professional firms have navigated similar changes; the big accounting firms, for example, have long been run by full-time managers.

"Ralph Baxter is the epitome of the 21st century law-firm leader," says David Wilkins, the director of Harvard Law School's Program on the Legal Profession. "Firms that have radically moved themselves up the prestige ladder and the profitability ladder and expanded their geographic scope have had full-time leaders," he says.
law_firms  CEOs  Orrick  best_practices  Big_Law  prestige  focus  professional_service_firms  scouting  HLS 
november 2011 by jerryking
Derrick Bell Dead at 80: Sad Loss of a Leading Legal Scholar
By: The Root Staff | Posted: October 6, 2011

A Pittsburgh native, Bell distinguished himself early in his law career through his work for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund during the civil rights era. Recruited by Thurgood Marshall, Bell oversaw 300 school-desegregation cases, according to The HistoryMakers. He also served as deputy director of the Office for Civil Rights in the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. He was known as a pioneer of the study of "critical race theory," which explores racism in laws and legal institutions.

According to his bio at The HistoryMakers:

In 1971, Bell became the first African American to become a tenured professor at Harvard Law School. There, he established a course in civil rights law and wrote Race, Racism and American Law, which today is a standard textbook in law schools around the country. Leaving Harvard, Bell became the first African American dean of the University of Oregon Law School, and in 1985, he resigned in protest after the university directed him not to hire an Asian American candidate for a faculty position. Returning to Harvard Law School, Bell would again resign in protest in 1992 over the school's failure to hire and offer tenure to minority women.
obituaries  lawyers  law_schools  African-Americans  Thurgood_Marshall  Derrick_Bell  HLS  scholars 
october 2011 by jerryking
To Beat Foreign Copycats, Sell Services -
February 24, 2011 | BusinessWeek | By Vivek Wadhwa. Don't
compete with imitators by increasing production, argues Henry Chesbrough
in his latest book (Open Services Innovation: Rethinking Your Business
to Grow and Compete in a New Era. ). Instead, lure repeat customers with
services.

Wadhwa is a visiting scholar at University of California-Berkeley,
senior research associate at Harvard Law School, and director of
research at the Center for Entrepreneurship and Research
Commercialization at Duke University. Follow him on twitter—@vwadhwa
Vivek_Wadhwa  competitive_strategy  competition  book_reviews  copycats  services  HLS 
april 2011 by jerryking
Notes from a small world
Apr 29/May 6, 1996 | The New Yorker. Vol. 72, Iss. 10; pg. 87, 1
pgs | Patricia J. Williams. Harvard Law School graduated ten black
women in 1975, the most in its long history. Williams discusses these
ten women and examines how these first beneficiaries of affirmative
action feel now.
ProQuest  Harvard  law_schools  law_students  lawyers  African-Americans  women  affirmative_action  Ivy_League  elitism  HLS 
march 2011 by jerryking

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