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jerryking : haier   5

Tech Startups Struggle to Close Deals With IT Buyers - WSJ
By ANGUS LOTEN
Aug. 24, 2016

As Haier and other large corporations become increasingly digital, they are spending more time checking out technology offered by small, independent tech firms. Yet startup products and services for enterprises, while more accepted than a few years ago, still face significant resistance on the path toward revenue, CIOs and industry analysts say.

“I won’t take a risk on something that isn’t from a proven enterprise technology company,” especially for key functions, such as sales, human resources, cybersecurity or even office email, said Ms. Johnston. “Some startups are just so cheap or free, you’re nervous to go with it. What if they go out of business?”

Only 23% of 112 large corporations in a recent survey said working with startups was very important, according
customer_adoption  start_ups  large_companies  CIOs  Haier  challenges  cloud_computing  risk-aversion  SaaS  IT  risks 
august 2016 by jerryking
Little metrics can make a big difference (and here’s how to use them) - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN SCUDAMORE
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 09, 2016

small businesses can concentrate on collecting different metrics that have an impressive impact on the bottom line. I call it little data. It’s easier to collect and it’s a great way to take the pulse of your company on a day-to-day basis.

Here’s how to find the little data that matters, so you can make impactful changes to your business without spending a fortune.

Sweat the small stuff

Looking at traditional metrics – sales revenue, cost of customer acquisition and overhead – is important, but it’s also worth tracking intangible elements that don’t make it onto a spreadsheet.

I like to look around the office and focus on the energy – is there a buzz or are people bored? – or I’ll look at notes from exit interviews to see who is leaving the company and why. Keeping this little data in mind has enabled us to make important changes to our culture when we need to.

External feedback is powerful, too. Whenever I’m in a new city, the first thing I ask my taxi driver is, “Who would you call if you needed your junk removed?” I’m not just making conversation or trying to name-drop one of our brands – I’m doing my own survey to see if our marketing efforts are sticking....you can’t run your business on anecdotes, focus on key numbers that provide meaningful insight and measure them consistently.... communicating these benchmarks, everyone in the company can understand and can react quickly to fluctuations.

Our key metrics are call volume, website traffic, and jobs completed. We also work on our “customer wow factor” by looking at our Net Promoter Score (NPS), asking every customer how likely they are to recommend our services to a friend.[aka delighting customers]
anecdotal  Brian_Scudamore  consistency  delighting_customers  feedback  Got_Junk?  Haier  insights  massive_data_sets  measurements  metrics  NPS  small_business  small_data  Wal-Mart  UPS 
june 2016 by jerryking
Haier Goals
November 20, 2005 | New York Times | By ROB WALKER

Haier and other Chinese companies are now "differentiating themselves through innovation," Sull says. Instead of a "technology push" approach (a Bell Labs cranking out wonderful inventions that are then pushed into the marketplace), he adds, they are adept at using a "consumer pull" strategy, studying and responding to their customers' needs. Haier sells its products in more than 150 countries and was in the news recently as a possible buyer of Maytag.
Bell_Labs  Haier  white_goods  Chinese  wines  China  manufacturers  appliances  branding  Donald_Sull 
october 2011 by jerryking
Chinese Firms' Buying Binge Bet on Value of Western Brands - WSJ.com
JUNE 23, 2005 | WSJ | By GEOFFREY A. FOWLER.

Foreign companies have used several strategies to expand into the U.S. Some purchased U.S. brands …Others have built their U.S. customer base organically….But this path can take a long time and hit bumps along the way…But Japanese and Korean manufacturers that moved to the U.S. enjoyed a boost their Chinese counterparts lack: a government-protected home market in the 1980s and '90s that allowed them to finance their international push with rich profits from domestic sales. China has largely opened up its consumer market to competition. …Wooing brand-conscious Americans shoppers is a slow process that almost no Chinese manufacturers, used to selling on price, have mastered. Almost a decade ago, Konka Group Ltd., then China's biggest TV maker, made a big push into the U.S. and seemed to make progress for a while with a low-cost line of sets. But it never gained the marketing savvy or name recognition it needed and has since retreated to its home market, where it has slipped to No. 3…Buying an established company, on the other hand, offers Chinese companies immediate access to technology, experienced marketing executives and coveted distribution channels at a time when America's retail industry is consolidating…. The biggest hurdle, though, has been finding enough people who can bridge Chinese and Western business cultures. "Maybe Haier has the people," says Vincent Yan, a managing director of TCL. "We needed cross-cultural people with the right business experience. Those are very hard to accumulate."
brands  branding  China  M&A  mergers_&_acquisitions  Chinese  Haier  WPP  cross-cultural  white_goods  manufacturers  marketing  brand-conscious 
october 2011 by jerryking
Quick thinking, fast action
May 16 2005 | Financial Times | By Geoffrey Owen. Reviews ,
MADE IN CHINA by Donald Sull. What is the lesson here? If you want to
make headway in the Chinese market, you have to immerse yourself in the
environment, keep an eye out for anomalies that signal a selling
opportunity and, when you see one, go at it with all guns blazing.
China  book_reviews  entrepreneurship  Lenovo  Haier  Donald_Sull  anomalies 
march 2010 by jerryking

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