recentpopularlog in

jerryking : harlem   29

The Man With the $13 Billion Checkbook
July 12, 2019 | The New York Times | By John Leland [John Leland, a Metro reporter, joined The Times in 2000. His most recent book is “Happiness Is a Choice You Make: Lessons From a Year Among the Oldest Old,” based on a Times series. @johnleland]

In the neglected Harlem of the late 1990s, one dynamic player was the Abyssinian Development Corporation, a nonprofit offshoot of the powerful Abyssinian Baptist Church. Harlem then was littered with abandoned buildings that had been repossessed by the city. The development corporation, led by the Rev. Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, leveraged city and private money to restore these shells, then used the profits to acquire and rehab more buildings. Mr. Walker became the organization’s chief operating officer, working out of a basement office to help bring a Pathmark supermarket to 125th Street, the anchor for what would become a thriving commercial corridor in a neighborhood that had been given up for dead.

“Working for Calvin Butts, you saw the power of the black church, the shrewd political instincts of a power player, and the dynamic at the intersection of race, power, geography and culture,” Mr. Walker said. “It gave me tremendous insight into how power at that intersection plays out, and who benefits and who doesn’t benefit.”

Mr. Walker’s time at Abyssinian also taught him what it was like to rely on foundation grants, begging the mighty patron for favors. When he left to join the Rockefeller Foundation and then Ford — and as Abyssinian boomed and busted in a new Harlem — he vowed to change this relationship.
African-Americans  capitalism  Communicating_&_Connecting  contradictions  cultural_institutions  Darren_Walker  Ford_Foundation  Harlem  inequality  museums  patronage  power_brokers  New_York_City  personal_connections  political_power  relationships  tokenism 
july 2019 by jerryking
The Fashion Outlaw Dapper Dan
JUNE 3, 2017 | The New York Times | By BARRY MICHAEL COOPER.

Twenty-five years after luxury labels sued his Harlem
boutique out of existence, Gucci looks to him for inspiration......Things have come full circle. Litigation by luxury brands ran Dapper Dan’s Boutique out of business in the ’90s, and now here comes a major fashion house trying to grab the attention of a generation steeped in hip-hop by finding inspiration in a onetime fashion outlaw...... last week after Gucci unveiled a jacket that looked very much like one he designed nearly three decades ago for the Olympic sprinter Diane Dixon.

The fur-lined piece with balloon sleeves created by Mr. Day in the 1980s made use of the Louis Vuitton logo without the brand’s permission. The new Gucci jacket, designed by Gucci’s creative director, Alessandro Michele, remakes the Dapper Dan jacket, but with the interlocking double-G Gucci logo in place of the Louis Vuitton markings......Gucci [now] acknowledges its debt to the designer......In addition to Gucci’s recent salutation, the Museum of Modern Art plans to include Mr. Day’s work in its fall show “Items.” In an email, MoMA’s senior curator of architecture and design, Paola Antonelli, called Mr. Day a “trailblazer” who “showed even the guardians of the original brands the power of creative appropriation, the new life that an authentically ‘illicit’ use could inject into a stale logo, as well as the commercial potential of a stodgy monogram’s walk on the hip-hop side.”.....“What Dap did was take what those major fashion labels were doing and made them better,” said the rapper Darold Ferguson, Jr., who goes by the stage name ASAP Ferg and whose father, Darold Sr., worked at the boutique in the ’80s. “He taught them how to use their designs in a much more effective way. Dap curated hip-hop culture.”

Steve Stoute, the chief executive of the marketing firm Translation, said: “I think what Dap did, he actually taught an entire generation how to engage with luxury brands. Luxury brands, at that point, were not for us. They didn’t even have sizing for black people. So every time I walk into Louis Vuitton to buy a pair of sneakers, or buy a pair of pants in my size, I know they’re only doing it because of Dapper Dan.”....experiences with poverty growing up [crummy shoes] gave him an understanding of how clothes reflect social status.... the need to dress to impress is part of a generational mind-set for many black men who grew up in Harlem......Clothes designing sounds fascinating, but it’s hard work. Folks don’t realize that there are limitations in the body form. We’re humans: We have arms, legs, chest. The exciting part of designing clothes is that you can be really creative within the context of those limitations.”.......Samira Nasr, the fashion director for Elle magazine, likened Mr. Day’s work to that of the innovative hip-hop D.J.s of the era, such as Jason Mizell, a client of Mr. Day’s. Mr. Mizell, who died in 2002, created beats for Run-DMC under the name Jam Master Jay. “Sampling was taking existing music and slicing it to recreate new sounds for original lyrics,” Ms. Nasr wrote in an email. “Dap was sampling in a way. He was taking existing fabrications and breathing new life and beauty into them.”
litigation  luxury  brands  clothing_labels  Gucci  Harlem  stylish  mens'_clothing  African-Americans  New_York_City  sampling  streetwise  '80s  '90s  inspiration  hip_hop  fashion  outlaws  design  retailers  knockoffs  copycats  creative_appropriation  underground_economy  crack_cocaine 
june 2017 by jerryking
Black Kudos • Claude Brown Claude Brown (February 23, 1937 -...
Claude Brown

Claude Brown (February 23, 1937 - February 2, 2002) is the author of Manchild in the Promised Land, published to critical acclaim in 1965, which tells the story of his coming of age during the 1940s and 1950s in Harlem. He also published Children of Ham (1976).
writers  nostalgia  African-Americans  Harlem  New_York_City  '50s  lawyers  '40s  coming-of-age 
october 2015 by jerryking
A Chess Master Tries to Turn Rabbits Into Wolves - NYTimes.com
MARCH 13, 2015

In speed chess, players have only several minutes to complete a game. They punch a running game clock after every move, and the crackling pace tests a player’s reflexes, nerves and confidence.

“Hustlers go for the kill,” Mr. Times said. “If my kids can learn in that environment, it will give them a certain mental toughness they can’t get from a scholastic opponent or playing online.”

Mr. Times also respects a deep study of the game and played many grandmasters, once lasting an hour against the great Garry Kasparov.

“Kasparov’s a tiger, man,” he recalled. “You could almost feel him suggesting moves to you.”

In 2000, Mr. Kasparov had visited the Mott Hall School in Harlem where Mr. Times was coaching the school’s Dark Knights. They were players mostly from low-income families who had no previous chess experience. Mr. Times helped them beat well-funded private schools downtown and led them to seven national championships.
chess  New_York_City  Harlem  African-Americans  hustle  Garry_Kasparov 
march 2015 by jerryking
The Troops of the Red Rooster
April 4, 2013 |- NYTimes.com | By WILLY STALEY.
Harlem  restaurants  New_York_City 
april 2013 by jerryking
Book Review: Carl Van Vechten - WSJ.com
By JAMES CAMPBELL

Carl Van Vechten and the Harlem Renaissance

By Emily Bernard
book_reviews  African-Americans  Harlem  Harlem_Renaissance 
march 2012 by jerryking
Book Review: Harlem Renaissance Novels - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 3, 2011

Passing Fancies
Color, much more than race, dominated the fiction of the Harlem Renaissance

By JAMES CAMPBELL
Harlem  book_reviews  Harlem_Renaissance 
september 2011 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read