recentpopularlog in

jerryking : harvey_schachter   168

« earlier  
Companies should learn from history to avoid repeating mistakes of the past
September 27, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER.

Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it. -George Santayana
*****************************************************************
BEST BUSINESS HISTORY BOOKS
If you want to improve your knowledge of business history, two good places to start might be Prof. Martin’s books, From Wall Street to Bay Street, the first overview of the Canadian financial system in half a century, co-written with Christopher Kobrak, and Relentless Change, the only case book for the study of Canadian business history. Beyond that, here’s three others he suggests you could benefit from:

* Northern Enterprise: Five Centuries of Business History by Michael Bliss;
* Historical Atlas of Canada, Volumes I to III with different editors;
* Madisson Database Project 2018 by The Groningen Growth and Development Centre, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
*****************************************************************

Joe Martin, a professor of Canadian business history and strategy at Rotman School of Management, is on a mission. He believes Canadians lack sufficient knowledge of history in general and business history in particular. But rather than seize upon Santayana’s famed quote about the value of history, he points to an anonymous businessman who said, “I study history so I can make my own mistakes.”.....We fail in business schools, where virtually no courses are offered (other than at Harvard Business School, which has included history programs since its founding in 1908 and now has about 20 historians affiliated to the school). And we fail in corporations, where new leaders think history begins with their ascension and the few histories produced on the organization tend to be heavily sanitized....Certain themes recur in business history, of course. Recessions are one. Some signs suggest we may be on the cusp of one now, but each time they hit many corporate leaders seem flabbergasted, as if nobody ever experienced this situation before....Then there’s boom-and-bust. In the dot-com heyday of the late 1990s, Prof. Martin notes in an interview, he was chairman of Angoss Software Corp. and watching his net worth go up $250,000 a week. It was glorious until it started going down $250,000 a week. It seemed new, but history is littered with equivalent situations. .....At the core of understanding the history of our economy should be the baseball diamond growth model developed at the Stern School at New York University. At home plate is government because an effective political system enables economic growth. First base is a sound financial system, to allow growth. At second base are enterprising entrepreneurs to build upon that. Third base is for sophisticated managers of large corporations......As for corporate histories, he prefers them done by historians, with full access to the material, including key players. ....“Learn from history so you don’t repeat the mistakes of the past. That’s critical,”
best_of  boom-to-bust  books  business_archives  business_history  Canada  Canadian  dotcom  Harvey_Schachter  history  Joe_Martin  lessons_learned  Michael_Bliss  quotes  recessions  Rotman 
september 2019 by jerryking
Dichotomies and contradictions that managers face - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 3 DAYS AGO
Harvey_Schachter 
july 2019 by jerryking
Welcome to the 5 a.m. Club - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED JANUARY 3, 2019

Robin Sharma wants you to join the 5 a.m. club.

The Toronto-based leadership coach and author of the bestseller The Monk Who Sold his Ferrari says that in a time-starved world, we need at least an hour first thing in the morning to refuel, grow and become healthier people. And that should come at 5 a.m., a time when many top performers have started their day, from John Grisham to Ernest Hemingway, Georgia O’Keefe to Frank Lloyd Wright, Beethoven to Mozart. In his new fable The 5 a.m. Club, he explains that hour fits the concept of capitalization expounded by psychologist James Flynn, which reminds us that natural talent only carries us so far. The key to success is the extent of the potential that we actualize. “Many of the finest athletes in the world had less innate skills than their competition. But it was their exceptional dedication, commitment and drive to maximize whatever strengths they has that made them iconic,”
capitalization  Harvey_Schachter  books  early_risers  time-strapped  Beethoven  Mozart 
january 2019 by jerryking
Beware these management myths
November 2, 2018 | The Globe and Mail HARVEY SCHACHTER
goals  Harvey_Schachter  myths 
november 2018 by jerryking
Tom Peters summarizes 17 books in six words -
May 31, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER.

“Hard is soft. Soft is hard.”
“Hard” stands for plans, data, a company’s organizational chart and other analytical tools. And while such rigorous quantitative work usually seems solid, Tom Peters warns on the Change This Manifesto site that they aren’t. “Plans are more often than not fantasies, numbers are readily manipulated,” he writes. “And org charts: In practice, they have little to do with how things actually get done.”

In the second sentence, he is referring to “the soft stuff” – people, relationships and organizational culture. It’s important. And it’s hard to get right.

So soft is hard – very hard.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Here are the speed traps to be aware of:

* Relationships take time.
* Recruiting allies to your cause takes time.
* Reading and studying to improve takes time.
* Waiting takes time – and yes, you should wait, since delay and pondering are essential elements of being human.
* Aggressive listening takes time.
* Practice and prep for anything takes time.
* Management-by-walking-around takes time.
* The slack you need in your schedule that comes from thinking about what not to do so you’re not overscheduled takes time.
* Thoughtful small gestures take time.
* The last one per cent of any task or project – the often critical part, the polishing part – takes time.
* Game-changing design takes time. Laurene Powell Jobs noted that her husband, Steve Jobs, and his chief designer, Jony Ive, “would discuss corners for hours.”
* Excellence takes time.
* “It is a hyper-fast-paced world. And the speed therein is madly increasing. Excellence, however, takes time; and some, or most, measures cannot be rushed,” he says.
* So remember hard is soft. Soft is hard. And don’t automatically get caught in the speed trap.

[jk....from Tony Schwartz...... Judgment is grounded in discernment, subtlety and nuance.... Good judgment grows out of reflection, and reflection requires the sort of quiet time that gets crowded out by the next demand].

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
THE VALUE OF PAIRED OPPOSITES
it’s not enough to merely explain what you believe. You also need to explain what you don’t believe. It is not enough to explain what you stand for. You need to explain what you stand against. That is critical with colleagues in the workplace; it helps to clarify. But it also works in Mr. Williams’ field, advertising. “Don’t just tell us what you are. Tell us what you are not,” he says.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
check email at 7 a.m., 11 a.m., 4 p.m., and 8 p.m., with some additional time to purge emails each day.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Seth Godin: Add energy to every conversation, ask why, find obsolete items on your task list and eliminate them, treat customers better than they expected, offer to help to co-workers before they ask, leave things more organized than you found them, cut costs, and find other great employees to join the team.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
two words that will build trust with customers, according to consultant Jeff Mowatt: “As promised.” Add them in to conversations after you deliver something on time or in detail, to emphasize it’s “as promised.”
Communicating_&_Connecting  e-mail  Harvey_Schachter  humour  Jonathan_Ive  Seth_Godin  soft_skills  speed  Tom_Peters  trustworthiness  dual-consciousness  pairs  clarity  thinking_deliberatively  on-time  opposing_actions  co-workers 
may 2018 by jerryking
Three steps to becoming a CEO - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 17 HOURS AGO
CEOs  Harvey_Schachter  howto 
february 2018 by jerryking
Why you should create space in your life just to think
October 27, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER.

Here's how:

Commit to a topic: There are many things that could flood your mind in any given moment. Pick an important topic and commit to thinking about it.

Block some time: Set aside an hour or two to think about that topic or, Mr. Eblin adds, read about the issue if more research is needed (jk: sustained inquiry). “My sense is that blocking out more than two hours of think time at any one sitting is probably a waste of time for most people. It’s hard to maintain your focus on any given topic for more than an hour or two. If you need more than two hours of think time on the topic, schedule more time on other days,” he writes.

Find another space for thinking: Get out of your normal work space to refresh yourself and provide different visual cues.

Attend a conference: If the issue is a toughie, consider a conference on the topic that allows you to immerse yourself in possibilities.

Take notes: By writing down the thoughts that come to your mind, you don’t have to worry about remembering them. That’s actually a part of creating space: more time to think, less to worry about remembering. And once you have a note-taking process – Mr. Eblin is a fan of Evernote, which is searchable and shared on various electronic devices – you now have a place to record that sudden thought at another time.
Harvey_Schachter  reflections  creative_renewal  Evernote  thinking  note_taking  visual_cues  buffering  slack_time  sustained_inquiry 
october 2017 by jerryking
Retailers must innovate and adapt to thrive in the age of Amazon
JUNE 26, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER.

Mr. Stephens does not believe we are seeing the death of retail. But we will need to see retail's reinvention, and soon. At the core will have to be the understanding that we don't need physical stores for distribution of goods, as Amazon has shown. But we will need them for experiences.

To his mind, Amazon is actually not a retailer. It's a data technology and innovation company that succeeds by ignoring the conventional wisdom of retailing and following its own ways. He notes that last year Macy's CEO Terry Lundgren said that while Amazon might pose some threat in apparel sales it would suffer because it was not prepared to handle complexities such as returns of items. But to Amazon, that's just another challenge to be handled by data and technology, as it is showing. When Amazon opened a physical store, it looked at retail through its own eyes and, in an age of mobile devices, eliminated cash registers, checkouts and lineups.

"But Amazon does not want to play in the physical experiences arena. They want to take the friction out of the equation. So if retailers can make the experiences in their stores rich, they can gain an edge," says Mr. Stephens. But most, of course, aren't all that effective for now, even at a basic level of romancing the customer, let alone the redesigned future he is calling for, where stores are redesigned around experiencing the product under consideration.
retailers  innovation  Amazon  Harvey_Schachter  experiential_marketing  Doug_Stephens  emotional_connections  contra-Amazon  slight_edge  physical_experiences 
september 2017 by jerryking
Boost your sales with tips from Warren Buffett
DECEMBER 18, 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

How to Close a Deal Like Warren Buffett
By Tom Searcy and Henry DeVries
(McGraw-Hill, 217 pages, $24.95)

The authors recommend a process they call "the triples" that will help you make the case for your product or service:

Triple 1: The prospect's three problems

First, find out – and write down – the three biggest problems the prospect faces in the area your product or service can help. This aligns you with the buyer's interests.

Triple 2: Your three-part solution

Now think carefully about how you can solve each problem. As you write it out for the client, remember that generic language such as "improved," "better," and "big difference" are not that compelling. Use actual numbers and refer to specific pressure points to focus on the outcomes your prospect can expect.

Triple 3: Your three references

The third step is to identify at least three references you can share who have experienced similar outcomes when using your products and services. This may be sensitive, given confidentiality and competitive issues. But the authors stress: "The most effective way to get the attention of prospects is to drop the names of others just like them."

The authors urge you to become a student of psychology and develop profiles of members of the prospect's team. Try to determine each person's fears, since those qualms may send your pitch into the ditch. Determine each person's point of view about your solution, as well as any other personal trait or event that might be of importance. At the same time, study the team dynamics, from where people sit around the table to who they defer to.

The most dangerous person will be "the eel." The authors insist that "in every deal, and at every prospect's table, there is always an eel – a person who is against the deal. Always. Eels have a tendency to hang out in the shadows. They are hard to get to, and they usually talk you down when you're not around."

Usually eels are driven by fear that they don't want to acknowledge, so instead they insist they are against the deal on principle. They are dangerous, and must be identified early. Then you can try to co-opt them, taking the eel's ideas and baking them into your proposal.
aligned_interests  books  deal-making  eels  enterprise_clients  Harvey_Schachter  indispensable  JCK  management_consulting  obstacles  pitches  problems  problem_solving  psychology  references  salesmanship  solutions  tips  think_threes  Warren_Buffett 
august 2017 by jerryking
How ‘red teaming’ can foster critical thinking at your company - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jul. 19, 2017

Red Teaming

By Bryce Hoffman
Crown Books, 278 pages, $37.00

the same concept, ensuring second thought in a time when complexity and psychological biases can get you in deep trouble. “Red teaming works. It works for small California tech start-ups and Japanese wealth funds. It works for old, iconic corporations and innovative disruptors. It works for non-profits and hedge funds. And it can work for your company too, if you let it,” consultant and former journalist Bryce Hoffman writes in Red Teaming.....Ideally, red teaming should begin after a plan has been developed but before it has been approved. You want time to modify it. The red team needs healthy discussion and a free flow of ideas. That is best achieved with divergent thinking, looking at alternatives, which ultimately morphs into convergent thinking. In that vein a good deal of the book is devoted to sharing techniques to achieve that balance.....
books  red_teams  Harvey_Schachter  devil’s_advocates 
july 2017 by jerryking
Are venture capitalists biased against women? - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 01, 2017
Harvey_Schachter  venture_capital  women 
june 2017 by jerryking
Improving your commuting time - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May 12, 2017

five strategies to consider:

Use the time to shift your mindset: The commute affords you the opportunity to shift from personal to professional mode. Rituals can help: One study shows those who developed small routines on the way to work – such as checking the news on the train or having a look at the calendar for the day – felt more excited about the day ahead, more satisfied with their jobs and less stressed than individuals with no set routine. Buying a latte from the same coffee shop may even do the trick.

Prepare to be productive: ....when you spend some of your trip planning for the day or the week ahead you arrive at work better prepared and therefore happier, more energetic and more productive. “Simply ask yourself: What steps can I take today and during this week to accomplish my work and career goals? How can I be more productive?” they advise.

Find your “pockets of freedom”: Usually the commute feels out of control but they suggest focusing on what you can control. Think also about activities you enjoy – such as listening to music or podcasts or reading books – that you can fit into your trip. You might even use the time as a chance to learn a new skill – knitting or a foreign language, for example....“So try to tune out the negatives of commuting and concentrate on the opportunity to express yourself and recharge.”

Share the spirit: Commuting can be lonely if you drive by yourself or sit in an isolated cocoon on public transit. ...talking to strangers can improve well-being for commuters. So reach out to those around you and chat, or use social media. If you’re driving, call a friend on your speaker phone or try to find a commuting pal to travel with.

Reduce your commute: Consider living closer to your work. ... Carefully consider the downsides of a long commute before committing yourself to one,” they suggest.

More generally, think about your commute, its consequences on your life and the five changes they suggest.
commuting  Harvey_Schachter  recharging  personal_productivity  rituals  routines 
may 2017 by jerryking
Beware of linearity: The shortest distance to your future may not be a straight line - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 09, 2016

linearity – dominates our thinking as we tackle problems. “Western thinkers are so habituated to thinking in terms of linear models that we allow them to inform not just what we think, but the fundamentals of how we think....Linearity is a critical and – apparently – inherent part of our cultural DNA....It’s not easy to forsake linearity...it’s essential to guard against slavishly following its tantalizing direction. Start by reading trade journals from another industry or studying a topic you have no interest in. Look for the less obvious interconnections around you. Think like a songwriter: Choruses and bridges signal a break with the preceding verse or the patterns that come before. But a true bridge, unlike a chorus, never repeats. They urge you to look for bridge moments rather than assume past is prologue.
=========================
Leaders are supposed to tell people the truth rather than what they want to hear. But fact checkers found Mr. Trump consistently at odds with the truth. And his supporters didn’t seem to care, assuming leaders lie anyway. TV host Stephen Colbert used the term “truthiness” to cover believing something that feels true even if it isn’t supported by fact. Says Fowler: “I wonder if truth-telling matters when people are interested in bigger issues?”
=========================
One of the highly touted productivity approaches is to tackle your most important thing (MIT) at the start of the day. Get it done before the chaos of the day overwhelms you.

But productivity writer Cal Newport, a Georgetown University computer science professor, feels the approach is insufficient – calling it “amateur ball” while the professionals play a more textured game.

The problem is that it implicitly concedes that most of your day is out of your control. But someone who plans every minute of their day and every day of their week will inevitably accomplish far more high-value work than someone who identifies only a single daily objective. The key, he feels, is to put enough buffers in your day to handle the unplanned stuff that hits you. With those slices of times and a spirit of adaptability you will find your work life not as unpredictable as you assume.
early_risers  linearity  Harvey_Schachter  thinking  humility  Donald_Trump  unplanned  unforeseen  buffering  GTD  productivity  discontinuities  nonlinear_systems  randomness  interconnections  Jim_Collins  truthiness  truth-telling  slack_time  adaptability  overwhelmed  time-management  unexpected  Cal_Newport  straight-lines  bridging  non-obvious 
december 2016 by jerryking
Struggling to find work? Try creating your own infomercial - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Oct. 30, 2016

Jim Beqaj,'s book, True Fit. an executive coach and former president of CIBC Wood Gundy, who learned from being the wrong fit in two top executive posts that we need to be less automatic or desperate in taking on jobs and far more discriminating.

Answer four questions, which will form the heart of your infomercial:

(1) What should you pay me for? List the strengths you bring to the job. Not the normal bumph on a résumé--a clear listing of skills.

(2) Who do you work best with? Look through your life and list the people you liked working with – and why. They may have been big-picture thinkers, energetic, boisterous, decisive, or collaborative.

(3) How do I like to resolve conflict? Workplaces can have strikingly different methods for handling conflict and you don’t want to find yourself in the wrong camp.

“Your conflict-resolution style could be, for example, competitive. If you’re in an environment where avoidance and accommodation is the order of the day, you could be seen as a bully, not a team player.

(4) What’s my perfect day? Describe a day or a specific project you worked on in which you were so absorbed in what you were doing it didn’t feel like work.
books  conflict_resolution  fit  Harvey_Schachter  inbound_marketing  infomercials  JCK  job_search  management_consulting  Managing_Your_Career  personal_branding  self-worth  strengths 
november 2016 by jerryking
Overcoming the three objections to hiring you - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Sep. 02, 2016
there are three reasons an employer won’t hire you: pay, experience, and fit.
The method is simple, shared by James Clear recently on his blog:

1. At the end of each work day, write down the six most important things you need to accomplish tomorrow. Do not write more than six tasks.

2. Prioritize those six items in order of importance.

3. When you arrive tomorrow, concentrate only on the first task. Work until the first task is finished before moving on to the second.

4. Approach the rest of your list in the same fashion. At the end of the day, move any unfinished items to a new list of six tasks for the following day.

5. Repeat this process every working day.

Mr. Clear says the Ivy Lea method is effective because it’s simple, it forces you to make tough decisions about priorities, it removes the friction of getting started by dictating what you should be doing, and forces you to ‘single task’ rather than multitask. “Do the most important thing first every day. It’s the only productivity trick you need,” he concludes.
hard_choices  Harvey_Schachter  productivity  GTD  hiring  priorities  monotasking  think_threes 
september 2016 by jerryking
The four-burners theory of success - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 14, 2016
Harvey_Schachter  work_life_balance  tradeoffs 
july 2016 by jerryking
Network orchestrators are the new path to profit - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 03, 2016 | Special to The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER

* "The Network Imperative" by authors Barry Libert, Megan Beck, and Jerry Wind.

Technology - Shift from physical to digital. Develop a digitally enabled platform around which people can congregate.

Assets - Shift from tangible to intangible assets. Physical assets are becoming a liability. Pay attention to your brand, a key intangible asset, and also view people as an asset, not an expense.

Strategy -move from operator to allocator. As a strategist, Mr. Libert has spent many years working with leaders to figure out what products to sell to what market. But these days, leaders should be active allocators of capital, like portfolio managers.

Leadership - The shift here is from commander – in charge of a highly structured, hierarchical, top-down organization – to co-creator, who knows how to motivate, inspire and work alongside others to develop the network.

Boards - His favourite shift, because it is the most difficult, is the switch from governance to representation.
Finally, the mindset must change to thinking less rigidly about roles, processes, products and industries.
assets  atoms_&_bits  books  business_models  capital_allocation  co-creation  eBay  Etsy  flexibility  Harvey_Schachter  intangibles  mindsets  networks  orchestration  pay_attention  platforms  portfolio_management  physical_assets  resource_allocation 
july 2016 by jerryking
How to balance old and new media - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 07, 2016
Harvey_Schachter  social_networking 
july 2016 by jerryking
Ditch the past, create the future - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jul. 05, 2016
books  Harvey_Schachter  future  howto 
july 2016 by jerryking
How fascination is a brand’s trump card - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jun. 19, 2016

She boils it down to seven forms in her book Fascinate and an online diagnostic tool:

Innovation: Such brands revolve around the language of creativity. She lists five adjectives that indicate how to make that advantage come alive: forward-thinking, entrepreneurial, bold, surprising, and visionary. Virgin and Apple are exemplars. Innovation brands open our eyes to new possibilities and change expectations. They invent surprising solutions; they do the opposite of what is expected.

Passion: This is about relationships – building a strong tie between the brand and users. Key adjectives: expressive, optimistic, sensory, warm, and social.

Power: This brand trait speaks of confidence. Key adjectives: assertive, goal-oriented, decisive, purposeful, and opinionated. The Tesla she and her husband recently bought is a power brand – not afraid to have opinions and lead the way. Beyoncé is also a power brand. Power brands need not be overpowering; they can guide gently, even lovingly. But they are confident, pursuing specific goals.

Prestige: This is about excellence. Key adjectives: ambitious, results-oriented, respected, established, and concentrated. It’s a mark of excellence such as Chanel or Louis Vuitton. People shell our big bucks for the prestige of Channel sunglasses, she notes, while Louis Vuitton maintains its standards by shredding unsold bags so they don’t end up sold at discount somewhere. She points to Brooks Brothers and Calvin Klein losing their prestige status as they opt for stores in malls.

Trust: This brand trait expresses the language of stability. Key adjectives: stable, dependable, familiar, comforting, predictable. I

Mystique: this is the language of listening, saying “Mystique reveals less than expected. It provokes questions. These brands know when to talk, and when to be quiet.” Key adjectives: observant, calculated, private, curiosity-provoking, and substantive (e.g. KFC’s 11 secret herbs and spices play to this sense of mystery).

Alert: This is the language of details. Key adjectives: organized, detailed, efficient, precise and methodical. ... Public-health campaigns are alert brands.

To use her shortcut, you need to identify the prime advantage you hold for prospects and customers.
brands  branding  brand_purpose  hacks  Harvey_Schachter  fascination  prestige  trustworthiness  innovation  books  political_power  mystique  forward-thinking 
june 2016 by jerryking
Want to save time? Write longer e-mails - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 03, 2016

nstead of just suggesting getting together – or responding to such a suggestion with “sure” – come up with a process that gets you and your correspondent to that goal while keeping messages to the minimum. Also, explain what you are doing, so the recipient understands.

So if a request comes in, he says, the reply should go something along these lines:

I propose we meet at the Starbucks on campus. Below I have listed four dates and times over the next two weeks. If any of these work for you, let me know and I will consider your reply confirmation that the meeting is set. If none of these times work, then call me or text me on my cell (<number>) Tuesday or Thursday from 12:30 to 1:30, when I’m sure to be around, and we’ll find something that works.
e-mail  productivity  Harvey_Schachter  time-management 
june 2016 by jerryking
Big insights gleaned from small data - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May 24, 2016
small_data  insights  Harvey_Schachter  Lego 
june 2016 by jerryking
Eight steps to making better decisions as a manager - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, May 08, 2016

Write down the key facts that need to be considered. Too often we jump into decisions and ignore the obvious.

Write down five pre-existing goals or priorities that will be affected by the decision.

Write down realistic alternatives – at least three, but ideally four or more.

Write down what’s missing. Information used to be scarce. Now it’s so abundant it can distract us from checking what’s missing (jk: i.e. the commoditization of information)

Write down the impact your decision will have one year in the future. By thinking a year out, you are separating yourself from the immediate moment, lessening emotions. [Reminiscent of Suzy Welch’s 10-10-10 rule. When you’re about to make a decision, ask yourself how you will feel about it 10 minutes from now? 10 months from now? and 10 years from now? People are overly biased by the immediate pain of some choice, but they can put the short-term pain in long-term perspective by asking these questions].

Involve at least two more people in the decision but no more than six additional team members. This ensures less bias, more perspectives, and since more people contributed to the decision, increased buy-in when implementing it.

Write down what was decided, as well as why and how much the team supports the decision.

Schedule a follow-up in one to two months.
Harvey_Schachter  decision_making  goals  buy-in  options  unknowns  following_up  note_taking  dissension  perspectives  biases  information_gaps  long-term  dispassion  alternatives  think_threes  unsentimental  Suzy_Welch  commoditization_of_information  process-orientation 
may 2016 by jerryking
Successful people act quickly when things go wrong - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Aug. 02, 2015

Productivity

Pivot quickly to maximize success
Airplanes are off course 90 per cent of the time but incessantly correct their direction, . Similarly, successful people correct their course quickly when off-kilter. They also set short timelines, have small daily to-do lists and drop stuff that isn’t working. Lifehack.org

Branding

Learn from but don’t live in the past
It’s great to know your company history but senseless to live in the past,Your company’s history is valuable only if customers and prospective clients believe it defines your brand and success, and differentiates you from competitors. If it doesn’t, build a new history.

Leadership

Pre-empt attacks with regular audits
To pre-empt an activist investor’s attack, eliminate financial and operational underperformance. Conduct regular vulnerability audits, looking at factors such as how earnings per share, profit and price-to-earnings ratios in the past 18 months compare with peers. If necessary, create an aggressive turnaround plan. ChiefExecutive.net

Human resources

Ask potential hires where they’ll go next
It sounds weird, but LinkedIn asks potential employees what job they want to have next after they leave the company. Founder Reid Hoffman says it signals the intent to have a huge impact on the individual’s career, helping to develop them for whatever they choose, and invites honesty. Vox.com

Tech tip

Use phone’s camera as portable copier
Productivity blogger Mark Shead recommends using your phone’s camera as a portable copy machine/scanner when on the road, photographing paperwork, train schedules or other information. Many new camera phones have the resolution to provide readable copies. Productivity 501.com
branding  productivity  human_resources  leadership  Harvey_Schachter  character_traits  habits  pre-emption  course_correction  Reid_Hoffman  career_paths  beforemath  overachievers  affirmations  pivots  audits  signals  vulnerabilities  hiring  interviews  high-achieving 
august 2015 by jerryking
Why boards must strike a fine balance - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jun. 07, 2015
Harvey_Schachter  boards_&_directors_&_governance  CEOs 
june 2015 by jerryking
HR tips from a Google insider - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jun. 02, 2015
Harvey_Schachter  Google  human_resources 
june 2015 by jerryking
Feeling uncertain, CEO? Better go on the attack - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May. 05 2015

Taking control of uncertainty is the fundamental leadership challenge of our time … ” he writes in The Attacker’s Advantage. “The advantage now goes to those who create change, not just learn to live with it. Instead of waiting and reacting, such leaders immerse themselves in the ambiguities of the external environment, sort through them before things are settled and known, set a path, and steer the organization decisively onto it.”
Harvey_Schachter  Ram_Charan  uncertainty  algorithms  mathematics  data  management_consulting  anomalies  change  Jack_Welch  books  gurus  offense  data_driven  leadership  ambiguities  offensive_tactics 
may 2015 by jerryking
Forget the problem. Focus on the solution - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 20 2015
books  Harvey_Schachter  problem_solving  problems 
january 2015 by jerryking
Why you need a chief reputation officer - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jan. 04 2015
reputation  executive_management  Harvey_Schachter 
january 2015 by jerryking
The key to winning a dogfight? Focus - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Dec. 14 2014,

Keep your focus: Stay abreast of your field, reading widely and probing for information. His team’s knowledge of how to handle the dire situation they faced, from outwitting the enemy after being hit, to the latest survival training when plunged into the water, kept them alive. “The better informed you are, the better you will be,” he said....to get better you have to debrief after your skirmishes....Do you consistently get the most important things done at work? Your day is jammed with many activities, some important and some minutia. You need to know: If you could only accomplish only one thing, what that would be. Events will arise during the day that require your attention, and you must deal with them. But he notes that we often find ourselves in reactive mode, which can sometimes be misguided. This question addresses the active mode, setting out a plan of what to accomplish for the day...How do you and your teammates prepare for each day’s biggest challenges at work? Top guns have lots of computer displays surrounding them in the cockpit. Because of that complexity, they need a simple plan and to spend time discussing the “what ifs,” so when plans need to be altered, they can manoeuvre effectively. “It’s the same with business people. If you’re surprised, you will have trouble,” he warned.
Vietnam_War  veterans  focus  lessons_learned  U.S._Navy  Harvey_Schachter  feedback  scenario-planning  anticipating  preparation  contingency_planning  debriefs  post-mortems  simplicity  off-plan  priorities  surprises  market_intelligence  beforemath 
december 2014 by jerryking
Why women shouldn’t avoid centre stage - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
The Globe and Mail (includes correction)
Published Sunday, Nov. 30 2014
women  leadership  howto  leaders  Harvey_Schachter 
december 2014 by jerryking
Google’s secret: hire people for what they don’t know yet - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Nov. 25 2014

One year, after speaking before a group of Rhodes Scholars, senior Google executive Jonathan Rosenberg was trying to decide who from that exceptional group to invite to formal interviews when he ran into company founder Sergey Brin in a hallway and explained the problem. "Why decide at all?" his boss said. "Offer them all jobs." It seemed crazy but after second thought he realized it made sense to grab the best talent you can and deploy them effectively. Many went on to be very successful at the company.......The authors stress that hiring is the most important thing executives do. "The higher up you go in most organizations, the more detached the executives get from the hiring process. The inverse should be true," they declare. That means not leaving the decision to the hiring manager, who may not be the individual's boss for long and may be edgy about hiring individuals more talented than he is.
Google  hiring  Rhodes  talent  Harvey_Schachter  talent_acquisition 
november 2014 by jerryking
Why strategy is dead in the water - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Nov. 16 2014

Old line discussions of "strategy" assumed that one's competitors today will be one's competitors forever. It also assumed that companies can control distribution and send out targeted marketing messages to prospects and customers. These days, competition can come at you from all directions – witness, for example, the many companies with which Amazon.com, once just a book seller, competes. Distribution is wild and woolly, and in an era of social media, companies no longer control the messages about their offerings.

“Control and predictability have been greatly diminished,”
Here are seven factors that prevent you from being classically strategic:

1. Incrementalism has been disrupted
2. Outcomes are unpredictable.
3. The past is no longer a predictor.
4. Competitive lines have been dissolved.
5. Information is abundant (i.e. the commoditization_of_information)
6. It hard to forecast value.
7. Fast trumps long-term.
fast-paced  commoditization_of_information  strategy  Michael_Porter  Harvey_Schachter  long-term  unpredictability  GE  IBM  data  information_overload  incrementalism  Amazon  kaleidoscopic 
november 2014 by jerryking
Negotiating mistakes you should not make - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Oct. 05 2014,
negotiations  Harvey_Schachter  mistakes  howto 
october 2014 by jerryking
Five questions to hone your business strategy - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Sep. 28 2014

1. Why does our business deserve to succeed?
2. What would a new CEO do?
3. Imagine it is three to six years in the future and the proposed strategy has been unsuccessful. Why did it fail?
4. What would have to be true for our strategy to succeed?
5. Would I put my own money into this?
strategy  business_planning  Harvey_Schachter  execution  effectiveness  assumptions  anticipating  questions  biases  overconfidence  self-delusions  skin_in_the_game 
september 2014 by jerryking
The real goods on fake currencies - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 16 2014

Wildcat Currency
By Edward Castronova
(Yale University Press, 265 pages, $32.20)
digital_currencies  currencies  virtual_currencies  metacurrencies  Harvey_Schachter  books  book_reviews 
september 2014 by jerryking
Why saying less achieves more - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Apr. 29 2014,

heed the advice of our high school English teacher on the importance of outlines. Professionals believe that’s beneath them, he notes, particularly before a big pitch or meeting. “It’s a huge mistake to make, especially when you consider the vast amount of information you have to handle, distill, and disseminate in these situations,” he writes.

He suggests trying “mind mapping” to get your ideas organized before writing a report or making a presentation. Usually that involves unleashing the ideas in haphazard fashion on paper to find links and structure.
brevity  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  Harvey_Schachter  information_overload  pitches  meetings  mind-mapping  presentations 
september 2014 by jerryking
Four principles of operational excellence - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Aug. 05 2014,
COO  Harvey_Schachter  operations 
august 2014 by jerryking
Hey, you: Stop multitasking and focus - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jul. 27 2014

New Jersey-based consultant Daniel Forrester believes we all have to find similar moments of contemplation to be more effective in our careers. “It’s about tapping into what makes us unique as human beings: reflection and conscience. The big innovations all are a product of reflection, getting a break from the tumult of immediacy that surrounds us,” he said in an interview.

The author of Consider: Harnessing the Power of Reflective Thinking in Your Organization was moved to study the issue when reading an article about the now-legendary “think weeks” that Bill Gates took as the head of Microsoft. Armed with cans of diet Orange Crush and a stack of documents with ideas and proposals, he would isolate himself in his cottage and spend time pondering future possibilities for his tech empire.

It’s a fascinating idea, but Mr. Forrester wondered why the CEO couldn’t manage to find reflection space in the office. “He’s Bill Gates. Why can’t he shut the door and get time to think?” he asked in an interview.

Mr. Forrester believes we have to change that tendency – and not only for CEOs, but for everyone. Reflection, he explained, is the space between data and meaning.

It starts with think weeks, proper vacations and sabbaticals to refresh and reflect. Our brains continue to work on issues even at rest, and the subconscious can come up with some electrifying findings. So it’s vital that a vacation be a true vacation, rather than pushing an employee, through social pressure or direct orders, to check e-mail a dozen times a day.
books  contemplation  creative_renewal  focus  Harvey_Schachter  immediacy  innovation  meditation  monotasking  multitasking  reading  reflections  sabbaticals  slack_time  strategic_thinking  sustained_inquiry  thinking  timeouts 
july 2014 by jerryking
Want success? Limit your options - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jul. 20 2014

Like Cortez who burnt his ships, limit your options to be successful. Careers blogger Penelope Trunk says having a lot of alternatives makes you lazy, increases anxiety, and leads to decision avoidance. Ignore the fear of some formidable project or career leap; just go for it, without fallback possibilities.
Harvey_Schachter  GTD  constraints  optionality  alternatives 
july 2014 by jerryking
Tame big data and you'll reap the rewards - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Apr. 15 2014

“It’s a catchall term for data that doesn’t fit the usual containers. Big data refers to data that is too big to fit on a single server, too unstructured to fit into a row-and-column database, or too continuously flowing to fit into a static data warehouse. While its size receives all the attention, the most difficult aspect of big data really involves its lack of structure,”....He cites some industries that have big data but aren’t making proper use of it. Banks have massive amounts of information about their customers but have been underachievers in helping them make sense of it all and presenting targeted marketing offers. Retailers have purchase behaviour information from their point-of-sales systems but, with the exception of Wal-Mart and Britain’s Tesco, haven’t done a lot until recently.
Harvey_Schachter  Thomas_Davenport  banks  retailers  massive_data_sets  behavioural_data  books  book_reviews  unstructured_data  analytics  competingonanalytics  sense-making  point-of-sale  Wal-Mart  Tesco 
june 2014 by jerryking
Six habits of successful digital firms - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 07 2014, The Globe and Mail HARVEY SCHACHTER

Strategic Digital Marketing
By Eric Greenberg and Alexander Kates
(McGraw-Hill Education, 352 pages, $31.95).

the Amazon Price Check app on their mobile device, they can be in a store and, by scanning the bar code, see whether that item can be obtained more cheaply from Amazon, which offers lures like free shipping.......a phrase Google uses, "Zero moments of truth," to describe the critical times when consumers use the Internet to evaluate your offering. It might be the Amazon Price Check. It might be a consumer visiting your website and then plugging into social feedback from Facebook and Twitter. Prospects might scan reviews by recent purchasers. This information can be accessed quickly and could determine whether they will deal with you – now, or forever...... little attention is paid to return on investment when digital marketing strategies are developed. They believe that less than 10 per cent of large organizations base their digital initiatives on some measure of financial return on investment (ROI). Instead, the talk is of "likes" that might be generated by a Facebook campaign, or the followers and awareness a Twitter initiative might spark.

"If increasing sales is the ultimate goal, shouldn't we always evaluate digital marketing, and all marketing for that matter, through an ROI lens?"

1. Platform convergence, not product conformity. Companies such as Google, Amazon and Facebook are knocking heads, not operating in the separate niches where they started, but fighting to be the go-to platforms for online denizens.
2. Big data, not blind deductions.These companies rely heavily on data to drive their decisions, rather than guessing. They also run tests to see what might work, learning early from interaction with real customers.
3. Customer experiences, not conventional expectations. The best companies are fiercely focused on customers, relentlessly looking for new ways to refine and improve the customer experience.
4. Networks, not bulwarks.
These firms understand the importance of their networks, such as customers and corporate partners.
5. Top talent, not hired hands. These companies realize the importance of talent, and actively seek the best people they can find.
6. Innovation, not immediate gratification
Amazon  books  conformity  customer_experience  data_driven  delayed_gratification  digital_economy  digital_strategies  FAANG  Facebook  Google  Harvey_Schachter  habits  innovation  marketing  massive_data_sets  mobile_applications  moments_of_truth  networks  platforms  ROI  talent 
january 2014 by jerryking
A radical rethink of ‘decision factories’
Nov. 17 2013 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER.

In regular factories, employees are consumed by repetitive daily tasks. But in decision factories, the focus is on project work. Whether it’s developing an advertising campaign or preparing a budget or coming up with a new product, knowledge workers operate in project mode. “You often hear in organizations the rhetoric that a project is taking away from the job. But most white-collar work is projects,” he said in an interview.

However, that isn’t recognized by companies or their staff. Instead of organizing work around projects, it is organized around jobs. Essentially, each job is based on the amount of work a person faces at their busiest moment – on projects, actually. But when that project is completed, workers aren’t immediately transferred to a new venture, since the just-finished project is seen as something they took on for a time. They return to their normal work, now quite reduced, between projects.

Mr. Martin drawns an analogy to power plants, which are built to handle peak demand on the hottest day in July, even though for much of the year they operate at much lower demand. “Organizations do that with people: They staff to peak load. Since people don’t want to seem not busy in slack periods, they fill it up with various initiatives. That’s why the day before the 10,000 people are let go, it seems like you need them all. But you really don’t,” he said .

In his article, he cited the example of a marketing vice-president, who is busy during the launch of an important project or when a competitive threat arises. But between those events, she will have few decisions to make, and may have little to do . The same is true throughout the knowledge factory.

The key to breaking the binge-and-purge cycle in knowledge work and making more efficient use of employees, Mr. Martin argues, is to redefine the employment contract and hire people for project work rather than specific jobs. He believes that in such a framework, we would need only 70 per cent of the people we currently have in a given decision factory.

So instead of being hired to handle a specific job for 52 weeks of the year, people would be hired for a specific level of work. They would still be working for the full year – they aren’t freelancers or contract workers – but would be scheduled to different projects and work with different leaders.
Harvey_Schachter  Roger_Martin  HBR  projects  knowledge_workers  project_management  project_work  employment_contracts  freelancing  gig_economy  peak_load  peak_demand  busywork  binge-and-purge_cycles  on-demand 
november 2013 by jerryking
Six clues your innovation process is broken
Oct. 20 2013 | - The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER.

1. Innovation is episodic
2. The process is invented from scratch
3. Resources are held hostage
4. Innovations are force-fitted into existing structures
5. Applying the same criteria to innovation
6. Insisting on the venture meeting its plan
Harvey_Schachter  innovation  warning_signs  strategy  competitive_advantage  shortcomings  problems 
october 2013 by jerryking
The 96-minute rule, and other timely tips - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Sunday, Aug. 18 2013,
Harvey_Schachter  productivity  GTD 
august 2013 by jerryking
Taking the cons out of conferences
14 Mar 2007 | The Globe and Mail pg. C.3. | Harvey Schachter.

Review of Seven Rules For Designing More Innovative Conferences By Ed Bernacki
The Idea Factory, 82 pages, $34

If you think back...
conferences  ideaCity  book_reviews  Harvey_Schachter  networking 
august 2013 by jerryking
The real way to network at a conference - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 16 2013 | G&M | by Harvey Schachter.

Want to meet a lot of people at a conference? A powerful way is to ask a (sensible) question during a speaker event. When Vancouver consultant Darcy Rezac did that at a Singapore conference, the friendliness and approachability of others afterward indicated he had unexpectedly introduced himself to 600 people.
Harvey_Schachter  conferences  networking  Communicating_&_Connecting  howto  work_ethic 
june 2013 by jerryking
First on your to-do list? The unpleasant tasks
Jun. 09 2013 | - The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER.

increasing the overall demand for what you sell – making the pie bigger, rather than figuring out on how to divide it with competitors – is an important part of success....Stop focusing on the quality of your work, because people care more about the quality of their own work, advises blogger Ben Drake. Help others improve by asking them what they need from you to help them soar.
Harvey_Schachter  serving_others  talent_management  thinking_big  to-do 
june 2013 by jerryking
Five traits of smart risk takers
March 13, 2013 | G&M | Harvey Schachter.

Review of Taking Smart Risks by Doug Sundheim. Sundheim lists five common dangers of playing it safe for too long:

• You don’t win.
• You don’t grow.
• You don’t create.
• You lose confidence as you lose momentum and start to freeze up.
• You don’t feel alive, because you aren't challenging yourself.
Harvey_Schachter  risks  risk-taking  books  book_reviews  soul-enriching  personality_types/traits  growth  cost_of_inaction  character_traits  complacency  risk-aversion  risk-avoidance  playing_it_safe 
march 2013 by jerryking
How ineffective managers spend their time - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Sunday, Mar. 10 2013
Harvey_Schachter  managing_people 
march 2013 by jerryking
Five savvy questions for strategic success
Feb. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail |HARVEY SCHACHTER
Playing to Win
By A.G. Lafley and Roger Martin

(Harvard Business School Press, 260 pages, $30)
The strategy worked, by satisfying the five questions:

* Winning aspirations. Most companies have lofty mission statements but the authors say that isn’t the same thing as having a strategy. It’s a starting point, statements of an ideal future.
* Where to play. In which markets and with which customers is it best to compete? This is a vital question, because you can’t be all things to all people if you want to be successful.

* How to win.After selecting the playing field, you must choose the best approach, which the authors stress might be very different from your competitors.
* Core capabilities. What capabilities must be in place for your organization to win?
* Management systems. What needs to be in place in your management approach to support the strategy, and measure how successful you are with it
Harvey_Schachter  Roger_Martin  questions  book_reviews  P&G  A.G._Lafley  strategy  mission_statements  ambitions  internal_systems  core_competencies  Instrumentation_monitoring  measurements  books  capabilities 
february 2013 by jerryking
Four rules for successful viral marketing - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Jan. 29 2013, 6:34 PM EST

Last updated Tuesday, Jan. 29 2013
marketing  Harvey_Schachter  rules_of_the_game  virality 
january 2013 by jerryking
A six-point checklist for hiring consultants
Jan. 02 2013 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER,
Special to The Globe and Mail

David Fields, a consultant on hiring consultants, offers in his new book, The Executive’s Guide to Consultants: key points-
1. Why are we considering an outside expert?
2. What are our desired outcomes?

3. When will we know we’re on the right track?

4. What risks do we face?

5. What is the value of taking on this project?

6. Which parameters will limit or affect the project?
Harvey_Schachter  management_consulting  risks  checklists  book_reviews  questions  hiring  outcomes  JCK 
january 2013 by jerryking
Tips from the pros on how to advance your career
Dec. 28 2012 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER.

To advance your career, here are some other pointers:

(1) Surround yourself with smart people

As you move up in an organization, your responsibility increases, and it becomes tougher to do everything on your own.

“Many people feel defeated when they can no longer succeed through their own efforts. Rather than seeing it as a sign of personal weakness, surround yourself with smart people who have different perspectives and different skills,” she says. “Listen to them respectfully and attentively, draw out their ideas, and work to integrate their perspectives into your plans and solutions to problems.”

(2) Be your own CEO.

“Leadership isn’t about a title. Real leadership is about getting big things done in the face of challenges, being part of the solution versus the problem, and inspiring everyone around you – even if you’re the janitor,” he says.

(3) Know yourself

The foundation of success is self-awareness – of your strengths, interests, personality factors and the desires that form the basis of good career choices throughout life...spend time reflecting on one's internal processes.” Routinely ask yourself: Does what I am doing really play into what I’m best at or really want to do – or am I being sidetracked by the appeal of the money or the status of the promotion?

(4) Develop – and use – your contact list

If handed a business card, make sure you put it in your e-mail contacts and send a ‘glad to meet you’ note.” Then keep in touch, perhaps quarterly or twice a year for the “hot contacts” who might help you down the road to advance your career.

(5) Write an anti-résumé

Your résumé probably looks backward at your career. Instead write a forward-looking statement of your strengths, desires and influences, and what possibilities intrigue you for the future. It should be about a half-page, perhaps in bullet-point format. “update it regularly. It helps you to catch clues about the future rather than look through the rear-view mirror as a résumé does,”.

(6) Embrace the digital you (one-page branding site or an authentically powerful LinkedIn profile).
(7) Focus on the fix. (present solutions, not problems. See what might be accomplished, or suggest a solution to a problem or a means of overcoming a barrier.
(8) Rise above being average. Strive to be at the "Picasso-level".
(9) Get involved in volunteering.
(10) Polish your credentials.
LinkedIn  Managing_Your_Career  Roger_Martin  Rotman  Harvey_Schachter  tips  movingonup  self-awareness  networking  problem_solving  leadership  overachievers  personal_branding  CEOs  strengths  forward_looking  résumés  Pablo_Picasso  anti-résumé  volunteering  smart_people  backward_looking  one-page  high-achieving 
december 2012 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: Talking points for better communication
September 5, 2012 | G&M | HARVEY SCHACHTER.
The command-and-control approach to corporate communications is dead. Now, it's personal and connected
command-and-control  Harvey_Schachter  books  Communicating_&_Connecting 
december 2012 by jerryking
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read