recentpopularlog in

jerryking : herminia_ibarra   3

What's Your Story?
January 2005 | HBR | by Herminia Ibarra and Kent Lineback.

Ibarra and Lineback say that few people use storytelling to help them pursue their professional goals, and those who do, do so ineffectively. Tales of transition can easily have the elements of a good drama—a protagonist the listeners cares about, a catalyst inducing action, trials and tribulations, a turning point, and a resolution—but they also bring special challenges. One problem comes from minimizing the discontinuities involved, thereby making the person appear safe, dull, and unremarkable. This is a response to fearing that listeners, hearing about our change of direction, will doubt our commitment to the new professional goal.
HBR  storytelling  Herminia_Ibarra  Communicating_&_Connecting  protagonists  persuasion  discontinuities  narratives  transitions  turning_points 
april 2012 by jerryking
How to Stay Stuck in the Wrong Career
December 2002 | HBR | by Herminia Ibarra.

But change actually happens the other way around. Doing comes first, knowing second, because changing careers means redefining our working identity--our sense of self in our professional roles, what we convey about ourselves to others and, ultimately, how we live our working lives. Who we are and what we do are tightly connected, the result of years of action. And to change that connection, we must first resort to action--exactly what the conventional wisdom cautions us against....First, determine with as much clarity and certainty as possible what you really want to do. Next, use that knowledge to identify jobs or fields in which your passions can be coupled with your skills and experience. Seek advice from the people who know you best and from professionals in tune with the market. Then simply implement the resulting action steps. Change is seen as a one-shot deal: The plan-and-implement approach cautions us against making a move before we know exactly where we are going....It all sounds reasonable, and it is a reassuring way to proceed. Yet my research suggests that proceeding this way will lead to the most disastrous of results, which is to say no result. So if your deepest desire is to remain indefinitely in a career that grates on your nerves or stifles your self-expression, simply adhere to that conventional wisdom, presented below as a foolproof, three-point plan....what consumed 90% of the year he spent looking for a new career, is what the conventional models leave out-a lot of trial and error....that it is possible to discover one's "true self," when the reality is that none of us has such an essence. (See the sidebar "Our Many Possible Selves "for a discussion of why one's true self is so elusive.) Intense introspection also poses the danger that a potential career changer will get stuck in the realm of daydreams....We learn who we have become-in practice, not in theory-by testing fantasy and reality, not by "looking inside." Knowing oneself is crucial, but it is usually the outcome of-and not a first input to-the reinvention process....To launch ourselves anew, we need to get out of our heads. We need to act....But when it comes to reinventing ourselves, the people who know us best are the ones most likely to hinder rather than help us....Mentors and close coworkers, though well meaning, can also unwittingly hold us back...So if self-assessment, the advice of close ones, and the counsel of change professionals won't do it, then where can we find support for our reinvention?....Reaching outside our normal circles to new people, networks, and professional communities is the best way to both break frame and get psychological sustenance.
Managing_Your_Career  career_paths  career  HBR  reinvention  Second_Acts  Herminia_Ibarra  analysis_paralysis  trial_&_error  action-oriented  self-assessment  self-awareness  pragmatism  counterintuitive  conventional_wisdom  change 
august 2011 by jerryking
All Writing Tells a Story :: YouPublish
Taken from the January 2005 HBR article titled, "What's Your Story?" by Herminia Ibarra and Kent Lineback. Key Elements of a Classic Story: # A protagonist the listener cares about. # A catalyst compelling the protagonist to take action.
# Trials and tribulations. # A turning point. # A resolution.///If you’re a professional in transition, learn to tell stories about your professional self, advise Herminia Ibarra and Kent Lineback. Explaining to others what’s going on when you’re in the midst of a major career change is risky and typically is done poorly. An effective narrative can boost others’ belief (as well as your own) in your character and ability to move onto something new; it gives meaning to the dry facts of your career history; and it will preserve the value of the past even as you embrace the future.
Communicating_&_Connecting  Herminia_Ibarra  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  narratives  protagonists  storytelling  turning_points 
november 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read