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Data Challenges Are Halting AI Projects, IBM Executive Says
May 28, 2019 | WSJ | By Jared Council.

About 80% of the work with an AI project is collecting and preparing data. Some companies aren’t prepared for the cost and work associated with that going in,......“And so you run out of patience along the way, because you spend your first year just collecting and cleansing the data,”.....“And you say: ‘Hey, wait a moment, where’s the AI? I’m not getting the benefit.’ And you kind of bail on it.”....A report this month by Forrester Research Inc. found that data quality is among the biggest AI project challenges. Forrester analyst Michele Goetz said companies pursuing such projects generally lack an expert understanding of what data is needed for machine-learning models and struggle with preparing data in a way that’s beneficial to those systems.

She said producing high-quality data involves more than just reformatting or correcting errors: Data needs to be labeled to be able to provide an explanation when questions are raised about the decisions machines make.

While AI failures aren’t much talked about, Ms. Goetz said companies should be prepared for them and use them as teachable moments. “Rather than looking at it as a failure, be mindful about, ‘What did you learn from this?’”
artificial_intelligence  data_collection  data_quality  data_wrangling  IBM  IBM_Watson  teachable_moments 
may 2019 by jerryking
America’s Biggest Supermarket Company Struggles With Online Grocery Upheaval
April 21, 2019 | WSJ | By Heather Haddon.

Kroger adjusts operations and invests in technology to hang on to customers who avoid stores; ‘we’ve got to get our butts in gear
Amazon  bricks-and-mortar  BOPIS  CDO  cultural_clash  delivery_services  digital_strategies  disruption  e-commerce  e-grocery  grocery  IBM  Instacart  Jet  Kroger  Microsoft  millennials  Ocado  Oracle  pilot_programs  post-deal_integration  retailers  same-day  Shipt  start_ups  supermarkets  Vitacost  Wal-Mart  Whole_Foods 
april 2019 by jerryking
Everything still to play for with AI in its infancy
February 14, 2019 | Financial Times | by Richard Waters.

the future of AI in business up for grabs--this is a clearly a time for big bets.

Ginni Rometty,IBM CEO, describes Big Blue’s customers applications of powerful new tools, such as AI: “Random acts of digital”. They are taking a hit-and-miss approach to projects to extract business value out of their data. Customers tend to start with an isolated data set or use case — like streamlining interactions with a particular group of customers. They are not tied into a company’s deeper systems, data or workflow, limiting their impact. Andrew Moore, the new head of AI for Google’s cloud business, has a different way of describing it: “Artisanal AI”. It takes a lot of work to build AI systems that work well in particular situations. Expertise and experience to prepare a data set and “tune” the systems is vital, making the availability of specialised human brain power a key limiting factor.

The state of the art in how businesses are using artificial intelligence is just that: an art. The tools and techniques needed to build robust “production” systems for the new AI economy are still in development. To have a real effect at scale, a deeper level of standardisation and automation is needed. AI technology is at a rudimentary stage. Coming from completely different ends of the enterprise technology spectrum, the trajectories of Google and IBM highlight what is at stake — and the extent to which this field is still wide open.

Google comes from a world of “if you build it, they will come”. The rise of software as a service have brought a similar approach to business technology. However, beyond this “consumerisation” of IT, which has put easy-to-use tools into more workers’ hands, overhauling a company’s internal systems and processes takes a lot of heavy lifting. True enterprise software companies start from a different position. They try to develop a deep understanding of their customers’ problems and needs, then adapt their technology to make it useful.

IBM, by contrast, already knows a lot about its customers’ businesses, and has a huge services operation to handle complex IT implementations. It has also been working on this for a while. Its most notable attempt to push AI into the business mainstream is IBM Watson. Watson, however, turned out to be a great demonstration of a set of AI capabilities, rather than a coherent strategy for making AI usable.

IBM has been working hard recently to make up for lost time. Its latest adaptation of the technology, announced this week, is Watson Anywhere — a way to run its AI on the computing clouds of different companies such as Amazon, Microsoft and Google, meaning customers can apply it to their data wherever they are stored. 
IBM’s campaign to make itself more relevant to its customers in the cloud-first world that is emerging. Rather than compete head-on with the new super-clouds, IBM is hoping to become the digital Switzerland. 

This is a message that should resonate deeply. Big users of IT have always been wary of being locked into buying from dominant suppliers. Also, for many companies, Amazon and Google have come to look like potential competitors as they push out from the worlds of online shopping and advertising.....IBM faces searching questions about its ability to execute — as the hit-and-miss implementation of Watson demonstrates. Operating seamlessly in the new world of multi-clouds presents a deep engineering challenge.
artificial_intelligence  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  automation  big_bets  cloud_computing  contra-Amazon  cultural_change  data  digital_strategies  early-stage  economies_of_scale  Google  hit-and-miss  IBM  IBM_Watson  internal_systems  randomness  SaaS  standardization  Richard_Waters 
february 2019 by jerryking
Why big companies squander good ideas
August 6, 2018 | | Financial Times | Tim Harford

.....Organisations from newspapers to oil majors to computing giants have persistently struggled to embrace new technological opportunities, or recognise new technological threats, even when the threats are mortal or the opportunities are golden. Why do some ideas slip out of the grasp of incumbents, then thrive in the hands of upstarts?.....“Disruption describes what happens when firms fail because they keep making the kinds of choices that made them successful,” says Joshua Gans, an economist at the Rotman School of Management in Toronto and author of The Disruption Dilemma. Successful organisations stick to their once-triumphant strategies, even as the world changes around them. More horses! More forage!

Why does this happen? Easily the most famous explanation comes from Clayton Christensen of Harvard Business School. Christensen’s 1997 book, The Innovator’s Dilemma, told a compelling story about how new technologies creep up from below: they are flawed or under-developed at first, so do not appeal to existing customers. Holiday snappers do not want to buy digital cameras the size of a shoebox and the price of a car.

However, Christensen explains, these technologies do find customers: people with unusual needs previously unserved by the incumbent players. The new technology gets better and, one day, the incumbent wakes up to discover that an upstart challenger has several years’ head start — and once-loyal customers have jumped ship.
............Within academia, Rebecca Henderson’s ideas about architectural innovation are widely cited, and she is one of only two academics at Harvard Business School to hold the rank of university professor. The casual observer of business theories, however, is far more likely to have heard of Clayton Christensen, one of the most famous management gurus on the planet.

That may be because Christensen has a single clear theory of how disruption happens — and a solution, too: disrupt yourself before you are disrupted by someone else. That elegance is something we tend to find appealing.

The reality of disruption is less elegant — and harder to solve. Kodak’s position may well have been impossible, no matter what managers had done. If so, the most profitable response would have been to vanish gracefully.

“There are multiple points of failure,” says Henderson. “There’s the problem of reorganisation. There’s the question of whether the new idea will be profitable. There are cognitive filters. There is more than one kind of denial. To navigate successfully through, an incumbent organisation has to overcome every one of these obstacles.”

......Henderson added that the innovators — like Fuller — are often difficult people. “The people who bug large organisations to do new things are socially awkward, slightly fanatical and politically often hopelessly naive.” Another point of failure......The message of Henderson’s work with Kim Clark and others is that when companies or institutions are faced with an organisationally disruptive innovation, there is no simple solution. There may be no solution at all. “I’m sorry it’s not more management guru-ish,” she tells me, laughing. “But anybody who’s really any good at this will tell you that this is hard.”
Apple  blitzkrieg  disruption  ideas  IBM  innovation  iPod  missed_opportunities  hard_work  Rotman  Steve_Jobs  theory  Tim_Harford  upstarts  large_companies  WWI  Xerox  Walkman  Clayton_Christensen  organizational_change  organizational_structure  MPOF  militaries  digital_cameras 
september 2018 by jerryking
Understanding Indoor Location Technology, the Market and Value Drivers
How does indoor location help when retailers are increasingly embracing inventory-free stores?
IBM  indoors  location_based_services  technology 
october 2017 by jerryking
The Rise of the Platform Economy - The CIO Report - WSJ
Feb 12, 2016 | WSJ | By IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER.

A platform or complement strategy differs from a product strategy in that it requires an external ecosystem to generate complementary product or service innovations and build positive feedback between the complements and the platform. The effect is much greater potential for innovation and growth than a single product-oriented firm can generate alone.”

The importance of platforms is closely linked to the concept of network effects: The more products or services it offers, the more users it will attract. Scale increases the platform’s value, helping it attract more complementary offerings which in turn brings in more users, which then makes the platform even more valuable… and on and on and on.
Alibaba  Apple  Facebook  Google  IBM  Microsoft  scaling  economies_of_scale  Uber  Salesforce  platforms  ecosystems  network_effects  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger 
february 2016 by jerryking
Cisco’s CEO on Staying Ahead of Technology Shifts - HBR
John Chambers
FROM THE MAY 2015 ISSUE

Mr. Chambers said that customers are the best indicators of when to make investments in new technology. “That’s one reason I spend so much time listening to CIOs, CTOs, and CEOs during sales calls,”
HBR  Cisco  anticipating  ksfs  transitions  indicators  market_intelligence  John_Chambers  IBM  layoffs  CEOs  market_windows  disruption  customer_relationships  sales_calls  CIOs  CTOs  listening 
may 2015 by jerryking
Apple Won’t Always Rule. Just Look at IBM. - NYTimes.com
APRIL 25, 2015
Continue reading the main story
Strategies
By JEFF SOMMER
Apple  IBM 
april 2015 by jerryking
IBM to Invest $3 Billion in Sensor-Data Unit - WSJ
March 31, 2015 | WSJ | By DON CLARK. Can CBC get good at communicating the final product on behalf of clients of Pelmorex. So CBC considers supplying the communications platform?

IBM plans to invest $3 billion over four years on a new business helping customers gather and analyze the flood of data from sensor-equipped devices and smartphones.... IBM announced that it is forming an alliance with the Weather Company, which owns the Weather Channel and other information providers. The two companies plan jointly to exploit data about weather conditions to help businesses make better decisions....the centerpiece of IBM's new business unit is a collection of online software called IoT Foundation that runs on IBM’s existing cloud services and allows customers and partners to create new applications and enhance existing ones with real-time data and analysis....IBM is betting that correlating dissimilar kinds of data will yield the highest value. “It’s essential to federate information from multiple sources,” said Bob Picciano, IBM’s senior VP of analytics.... the Weather Channel serves up 700,000 weather forecasts a second. It already sells data to a range of customers in agriculture, transportation and other industries that rely on weather.

But the opportunities have expanded, Mr. Kenny said, as weather sensors installed in many more places have contributed to more timely, localized forecasts. The added detail helps farmers predict more precisely, for example, where hail could impact their fields, Mr. Kenny said.

The Weather Company is turning to IBM, he said, because of its software expertise and relationships with customers in many industries.
sensors  IBM  weather  massive_data_sets  data  data_driven  analytics  Industrial_Internet  smartphones  cloud_computing 
march 2015 by jerryking
6 Things I'd Do If I Got Laid-off By IBM
Jan 26, 2015 | LinkedIn | J.T. O'Donnell

4) Become 100% clear on your specialty. Employers hire the aspirin to their pain. While you might be a diversely skilled, jack-of-all-trades, you can't market yourself that way. Saying you can do everything sounds unfocused and desperate. You need to know what your special problem-solving, pain-relieving expertise is (i.e. your special sauce). Then, you need to market it accordingly.

5) Optimize your sales tools for your business-of-one. Your resume and LinkedIn profile must be set up to showcase your specialty quickly - and with as much impact as possible. Keyword optimization is vital. Knowing what recruiters are looking for when it comes to your skill set and showcasing it in the proper format will dramatically increase the amount of activity you get on your candidacy. [Here's an article to help you understand how little time your resume has to get a recruiter's attention.]

6) Create an interview bucket list. The fastest way to find job opportunities is to build a bucket list of companies you want to work for and network your way into the process. The majority of jobs gotten today are done so via referral. Creating a target list of employers and working a strategy to build relationships with them is the smartest way to land a job with a company you admire and respect. Especially, when you may be competing against lots of other ex-IBM employees for positions. [Here's a step-by-step plan on how to create your own bucket list of employers.]
IBM  layoffs  tips  LinkedIn  bouncing_back  Managing_Your_Career  job_search  painkillers  pain_points  JCK  specialists  special_sauce  résumés  personal_branding  referrals  unfocused 
january 2015 by jerryking
Why strategy is dead in the water - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Nov. 16 2014

Old line discussions of "strategy" assumed that one's competitors today will be one's competitors forever. It also assumed that companies can control distribution and send out targeted marketing messages to prospects and customers. These days, competition can come at you from all directions – witness, for example, the many companies with which Amazon.com, once just a book seller, competes. Distribution is wild and woolly, and in an era of social media, companies no longer control the messages about their offerings.

“Control and predictability have been greatly diminished,”
Here are seven factors that prevent you from being classically strategic:

1. Incrementalism has been disrupted
2. Outcomes are unpredictable.
3. The past is no longer a predictor.
4. Competitive lines have been dissolved.
5. Information is abundant (i.e. the commoditization_of_information)
6. It hard to forecast value.
7. Fast trumps long-term.
fast-paced  commoditization_of_information  strategy  Michael_Porter  Harvey_Schachter  long-term  unpredictability  GE  IBM  data  information_overload  incrementalism  Amazon  kaleidoscopic 
november 2014 by jerryking
Peak Google |
October 22, 2014 | stratechery | by Ben Thompson
advertising  search  Google  IBM  Microsoft  competitive_landscape 
october 2014 by jerryking
How the big-data revolution can help design ideal cities - The Globe and Mail
DAVE MCGINN
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Sep. 24 2014

The big-data revolution faces two key challenges, both concerning the collection of information.

First, as is always the case when it comes to monitoring individuals and collecting details about their lives, is privacy. Second, there is the issue of using that data responsibly....Once municipalities have that consent, there is then the issue of harmonizing data sets in order to gain a fuller picture of issues. For instance, if a municipality wants to understand water-consumption levels, it helps to know how they track weather patterns.

Many cities are still struggling to understand how to use big data, but it promises to be a hugely important urban-planning tool.
algorithms  IBM  real-time  urban  sensors  municipalities  massive_data_sets  cities  data  decision_making  privacy  urban_planning  open_data 
september 2014 by jerryking
The Netherlands Looks to Big Data to Tackle Flooding - Tech Europe - WSJ
June 25, 2013 | WSJ |By BEN ROONEY.

IBM Inc.IBM -0.05%, has just landed a €1 million ($1.3 million) ‘big data’ research project in the country to bring together disparate data sources related to water to help the authorities plan reactions to deluges, monitor water quality, improve internal navigation — in short pretty much anything to do with water in the country.

The program is in collaboration with Rijkswaterstaat (the Dutch Ministry for Water), local Water Authority Delfland, Deltares Science Institute and the University of Delft.

The project, named Digital Delta, will investigate how to integrate and analyze water data from a wide range of existing data sources. These include precipitation measurements, water level and water quality monitors, levee sensors, radar data, model predictions as well current and historic maintenance data from sluices, pumping stations, locks and dams
Netherlands  massive_data_sets  floods  IBM  data 
june 2014 by jerryking
Cisco, IBM and HP chase startups’ fountain of youth - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT CYRAN
Cisco, IBM and HP chase startups’ fountain of youth
Subscribers Only

NEW YORK — Reuters Breakingviews

Published Monday, Dec. 23 2013
Silicon_Valley  Cisco  IBM  HP  mergers_&_acquisitions  Splunk  Tableau  Workday 
december 2013 by jerryking
How Not to Stay on Top - NYTimes.com
By JOE NOCERA
Published: August 19, 2013

Was BlackBerry’s fall from grace inevitable? When you look at the history of dominant companies — starting with General Motors — it is easy enough to conclude yes. There are companies that occasionally manage to reinvent themselves. They are nimble and ruthless, willing to disrupt their own business model because they can sense a threat on the horizon. But they’re the exception.

Wang Laboratories is the rule. And so is BlackBerry.

Wang went from an 80% market share in word-processing among the top 2,000 corporations to bankruptcy in about a decade, and BlackBerry of course went from inventing the cellphone and wireless email category, and utterly dominating it, to a a shadow of its former self today, with a “for sale” sign on outside corporate headquarters and a 2.7% global smartphone market share. What happened?

To rudely condense history, IBM’s PC happened to Wang and the iPhone happened to BlackBerry. At a somewhat more nuanced level, however, what happened to both Wang and BlackBerry is that when the storm clouds appeared they did not take their competitors seriously, they failed to understood what their customers wanted on the new landscape, and finally and most unforgivably they thought they knew what was best for their customers better than the customers themselves. More specifically, both firms thought their core customers were mistaken—wrong—to express a preference for the new, inferior arrival.
competitive_landscape  Wang_Labs  BlackBerry  blindsided  RIM  disruption  reinvention  failure  GM  IBM  iPhone  market_share  disproportionality  nimbleness 
september 2013 by jerryking
So Who Says a New Business Has to Be Small? - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
Published: July 11, 2013 | NYT |

Interviews Mike McCue

I just needed to actually build something. And that was a good lesson — do something, build something and everything will happen from there....One of the biggest mistakes I made at Netscape was to focus too much on competition. Microsoft was trying to kill us. And that caused us to think about what we were going to do about Microsoft. What we really should have been thinking was: How do we focus on what our users want? Why did they love our product? How do we make it more of something that they love? So my advice is, every time you have a thought about the competition, replace that with a thought about your customer and you’ll do far better as a business. .... I ask people what’s driving them, and what’s motivating them. I’m looking for answers along the lines of: “I want to be a part of a great team. I want to learn from really great people. I love the people I’ve met here, and I’d love to just be part of this.” I also look for people who are into doing something really meaningful and great. So I’m looking to see if their answers are centered around those two pillars. I’m trying to build a culture that’s focused primarily on the camaraderie of the team, because we’re going on a really big, important and giant journey together.

I don’t hire anyone who doesn’t genuinely share that motivation, no matter how good they are on paper.
Flipboard  entrepreneur  start_ups  lessons_learned  IBM  serial_entrepreneur  new_businesses 
july 2013 by jerryking
How Big Data Can Boost Weather Forecasting
February, 27th 2013 | A Smarter Planet Blog | Steve Hamm
IBM  weather  blogs  massive_data_sets  forecasting 
june 2013 by jerryking
Working With Big Data: The New Math - WSJ.com
March 8, 2013| WSJ | By DEBORAH GAGE.

Researchers turn to esoteric mathematics to help make sense of it all.

New views [of old data are arriving] came courtesy of software that uses topology, a branch of math that compresses relationships in complex data into shapes researchers can manipulate and probe....

Better Tools
Seeking better tools than traditional statistical methods to analyze the vast amounts of data newly available to companies and organizations, researchers increasingly are scouring scientific papers and esoteric branches of mathematics like topology to make sense of complex data sets. The developer of the software used by Dr. Lum, Ayasdi, is just one of a small but growing number of companies working in this field.

So much data is now available, in such vast scope and minute detail, it is no longer useful to look at numbers neatly laid out in two-dimensional columns and rows,.....The research that inspired Ayasdi was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or Darpa, and the National Science Foundation.......Data is so complex that using the same old methods, asking the same old questions, doesn't make sense....What is useful, he says, is to look at data arranged in shapes, using topology.

Topology is a form of geometry that relies on the way humans perceive shapes. We can see that an A is an A even when the letters are squashed or written in different fonts. Topology helps researchers look at a set of data and think about its similarities, even when some of the underlying details may be different....But topology is just one of the new methods being explored. Chris Kemp, former chief technology officer for IT at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and now the chief executive of cloud computing company Nebula Inc., says he expects to see a renaissance in advanced mathematics and algorithms as companies increasingly realize how valuable data is and how cheaply they can store it.......Using graph theory, a tool similar to topology, IBM is mapping interactions of people on social networks, including its own. In diagrams based on the communications traffic, each person is a node, and communications between people are links. Graph-theory algorithms help discover the shortest path between the nodes, and thus reveal social cliques—or subcommunities—which show up because the cliques are more tightly interconnected than the community around them.......Tellagence's algorithms, for example, predicts how information will travel as it moves through social networks, but assumes that the network will change constantly, like the weather, and that what's most important about the data is the context in which it appears.

These techniques helped Tellagence do a bit of detective work for a Silicon Valley company that wanted to track down the source of some influential ideas being discussed online about the kind of integrated circuits it makes, known as field programmable gate arrays. Tellagence identified a group of more than 100 Japanese engineers involved in online discussions about the circuits. It then pinpointed two or three people whom traffic patterns showed were at the center of the conversation.

Tellagence's customer then devised a strategy to approach the engineers and potentially benefit from their ideas.

Says Tellagence CEO Matt Hixson, "We love to talk about people who have followers or friends, but these engineers were none of that—they had the right set of relationships because the right people listened to them."
algorithms  Ayasdi  DARPA  esoteric  IBM  infographics  massive_data_sets  mapping  mathematics  Nebula  networks  patterns  sense-making  Tellagence  the_right_people  tools  topology  visualization 
march 2013 by jerryking
Cravath Hires David Kappos of U.S. Patent Office - NYTimes.com
February 6, 2013 | NYT | Peter Lattman
Cravath Hires 2nd Official From Obama Administration
By PETER LATTMAN
legal_strategies  recruiting  USPTO  law_firms  patent_law  IBM  Cravath 
february 2013 by jerryking
Overcoming Setbacks Helps One Executive - WSJ.com
October 5, 1999 | WSJ | By CAROL HYMOWITZ

Surmounting Setbacks Helps Executive Win War
Carol_Hymowitz  bouncing_back  movingonup  women  CEOs  setbacks  firings  Managing_Your_Career  networking  IBM  Apple  Exodus 
february 2013 by jerryking
Big data, cows and cadastres
Jul 5, 2012 | KMWorld Magazine July/August 2012, [Vol 21, Issue 7]| by Stephen E. Arnold.

The hero of the story is a bull named Badger-Bluff Fanny Freddie. Dairy cattle sired by him yield more milk. Genetic information processed by sophisticated numerical recipes yield more efficiency. With Badger-Bluff Fanny Freddie, the dairy industry has an opportunity to convert big data into more milk per head. Therefore, the knowledge generated by big data analytics methods translates directly to money.

The article explained: "Dairy breeding is perfect for quantitative analysis. Pedigree records have been assiduously kept; relatively easy artificial insemination has helped centralize genetic information in a small number of key bulls since the 1960s; there are a relatively small and easily measurable number of traits—milk production, fat in the milk, protein in the milk, longevity, udder quality—that breeders want to optimize; each cow works for three or four years, which means that farmers invest thousands of dollars into each animal, so it's worth it to get the best semen money can buy. The economics push breeders to use the genetics."...The IBM approach is to understand the prospect or customer's problem, develop a plan of action and then assemble the solution from the components in IBM's toolbox....The only problem is that the user-friendly system assumes that the marketing manager understands sample size, the strengths and weaknesses of specific statistical methods and the output itself. Eye-catching graphics is not the same as statistically valid data.
The challenges

The problem in those two examples boils down to people. There is a shortage of staff with big data and analytics skills. The problem is not local; it is global. Data and the need to exploit it are rising faster than the talent pool required to use the sophisticated, increasingly user-friendly systems. Kolmogorov worked with a pen and paper. He could tap into today's powerful system because he had the mathematical expertise required to tame big data. Using a mouse is the trivial part of figuring out cow genetics.
dairy  massive_data_sets  data_scientists  IBM  Google  Palantir  Pentaho  Jaspersoft  talent_pools 
december 2012 by jerryking
The Mayo Clinic: An information company
September 03, 2006 |Business Week | Stephen Baker
data  IBM  Mayo 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Disruption Opportunity
Summer 2003 | MIT Sloan Management Review | By Clark Gilbert

Three Phases of Disruption
Finding new customers
Realizing New Growth

(1) Disruption creates new net growth
(2) New customers must be found outside the established market.
(3) Disruptive technology is never disruptive to the customers who buy it.
(4) The new customer will make the disruptive path clear.
(5) A disruptive new business should start small and not be forced to grow quickly.
disruption  HBS  Clayton_Christensen  IBM  growth  newspapers  cardiovascular  customer_acquisition  new_businesses 
april 2012 by jerryking
Google's Turn to Quake? - WSJ.com
April 4, 2012 | WSJ | By ROBERT HAHN.

Google's Turn to Quake? IBM and Microsoft fought antitrust authorities on multiple continents, even as they lost their fleeting dominance....Antitrust policy is built on the notion that market concentration, collusion or nasty behavior toward rivals undermines efficiency by allowing producers to charge more and to block innovation. That's not a bad rule of thumb for "old economy" industries. Before Japanese auto makers broke through the barriers, Detroit charged too much, divvying up most of the surplus between workers and managers. Worse—much worse—auto industry technology and productivity stagnated, as stakeholders sheltered their pockets of privilege from the winds of change.

But high-tech industries in general, and information technology industries in particular, are an entirely different sort of beast. Market concentration and huge profits are typically a consequence of economies of scale and returns to intellectual property, not monopoly power. (It costs no more to produce 10 million copies of Microsoft Office than 10 copies.) And while the management of the current crop of winning companies may be as eager as monopolists of yore to bar the doors to rivals, rapid technological change denies them the opportunity.
Google  IBM  Microsoft  antitrust  competition  competitive_landscape  increasing_returns_to_scale  collusion  market_power  corporate_concentration  monopolies  economies_of_scale  intellectual_property  automotive_industry  productivity  winner-take-all  market_concentration  technological_change  returns_to_intellectual_property 
april 2012 by jerryking
The Internet Gets Physical
By STEVE LOHR
Published: December 17, 2011

The next wave of computing does not step away from the consumer Internet so much as build on it for different uses (posing some of the same sorts of privacy and civil liberties concerns). Software techniques like pattern recognition and machine learning used in Internet searches, online advertising and smartphone apps are also ingredients in making smart devices to manage energy consumption, health care and traffic.
Industrial_Internet  sentiment_analysis  sensors  IBM  GE  Steve_Lohr 
december 2011 by jerryking
Keys to a successful marketing campaign
Sept. 12, 2011 |G&M|Harvey Schachter.

Consider this article for Virgina of Fayeclack Communications

Marketing guidelines:1. Be noticeable: Engage consumers.Get them to think about your brand. 2. Be insight-based: Impactful campaigns must resonate with
some insight - a compelling, original observation about consumers or the
product category, based on research or chatting with consumers. 3. Be
memorable : Your ad must be remembered, e.g. Apple's 1984 ad jabbing at
IBM. 4. Be branded: It's important consumers remember the brand, and
that the ad supports & reinforces it. 5. Be "campaignable": A
single ad is not a campaign, but if effective should lead to one. 6. Be
differentiated: It's not enough to be remembered & to send a msg.
about being good - est. why your brand is better than its competition.7.
Be motivating to get people to actually do something.8 Be ethical:
Advertising is viewed with suspicion, so be above board. 9. Be
financially sustainable10. Be integrated: Able to deliver your msg. in a
complementary way through the various media.
marketing  ksfs  branding  Harvey_Schachter  campaigns  cross-platform  advertising  Waudware  insights  engagement  Apple  IBM 
september 2011 by jerryking
The Future of Analytics
May 16, 2011 | MIT Technology Review | By Tom Simonite. IBM
researchers are working on systems that can analyze data to tell
businesses exactly what action to take.
IBM  future  analytics  competingonanalytics  Freshbooks 
june 2011 by jerryking
Big business for big data
21 September 2010 | O'Reilly Radar | by Alistair Croll. What
IBM's acquisition of Netezza means for enterprises. With the
acquisition, it seems like big data is also big business. Companies are
using their data assets to aim their products and services with
increasing precision. And there's more and more data to chew on. Not a
website goes by without a Like, Check In, or Retweet button on it.

It's not just the marketers that are throwing petabytes of information
at problems. Scientists, intelligence analysts, governments,
meteorologists, air traffic controllers, architects, civil
engineers-nearly every industry or profession is touched by the era of
big data. Add to that the fact that the democratization of IT has made
everyone a (sort of) data expert, familiar with searches and queries,
and we're seeing a huge burst of interest in big data.
large_companies  massive_data_sets  Enterprise_2.0  data  analytics  IBM  IT  mergers_&_acquisitions  digital_economy  cheap_revolution 
may 2011 by jerryking
On a smarter planet, answers are hidden in the data
The biggest leaps forward in the next several decades—in
business, science and society at large— will come from insights gleaned
through perpetual, real-time analysis of data. With nearly 2 billion
people on the Internet (and counting), and with more and more of the
world’s systems becoming digitally aware, there is greater diversity in
the forms and shapes data is taking—transactions of every kind, rich
media, social media....Yet, while data is growing at an exponential rate
in volume and
complexity, time is not. Which is why no organization, city or country
can afford “enterprise amnesia.” Whether your goal is
to remain competitive or to change the world—or both—you need to
capture, understand and use all of your data. And that,
in turn, is why the new science of analytics must be core to every
leader’s thinking.
IBM  advertising  data  philosophy  hidden  latent  data_driven  analytics  Freshbooks  massive_data_sets  filetype:pdf  media:document  insights  real-time  leaders 
april 2011 by jerryking
Truck 2020: Transcending turbulence
October 2009 | IBM | By Sanjay Rishi, Kalman Gyimesi, Connie Burek and Michael Monday
trucking  IBM  industries  future  trends  filetype:pdf  media:document  turbulence 
march 2011 by jerryking
Turning Math into Cash
March/April 2010 |Technology Review, 113(2), 58-61 | William Bulkeley.
ProQuest  mathematics  IBM  analytics 
november 2010 by jerryking
China's Big Brands Tackle Web Sales - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 30, 2009 | WSJ | By AARON BACK. Sportswear Maker Li
Ning Revisits Its Internet Strategy as Buying Moves Online. Established
retailers and consumer brands in China largely ignored the Internet.
Instead, it's been the new companies —none more so than Taobao, a unit
of Chinese Internet giant Alibaba Group, which also runs Hong
Kong-listed business site Alibaba.com Ltd.--that have dominated the
sector.
China  branding  sportswear  apparel  e-commerce  IBM 
june 2010 by jerryking
IBM Turns to Software as It Reboots - WSJ.com
MAY 13, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by SPENCER E. ANTE
IBM  software 
may 2010 by jerryking
YourEncore Keeps Retirees in the Game
April 15, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Laura Lallos. Account
managers for the Web-based service recruit the best scientists and
engineers for member companies' ad hoc projects
retirement  management_consulting  Second_Acts  P&G  IBM  Eli_Lilly  General_Mills  ad_hoc  job_search  JCK 
april 2010 by jerryking
IBM: The company of the future
April 12, 2010 | Canadian Business | By James Cowan and
Jacqueline Nelson. How IBM went from selling stuff to selling ideas.
IBM has found [ways] to improve the customer’s experience. “It’s not
about doing stuff that hasn’t been done,” says Kronenberg, “It’s about
taking what’s out there and packaging it in a way that really adds
value.”
IBM  mobile_applications  packaging  creating_valuable_content  ideas  customer_experience 
april 2010 by jerryking
China's Inland Frontier Beckons - WSJ.com
MARCH 14, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by JASON LEOW. Big,
Lesser-Known Cities Hold Growth Prospects For Foreign Firms. Even with
their weaker purchasing power, China's inland cities can be rich
pickings for companies that learn how to tap them. Accounting for 18% of
China's 1.3 billion people, cities that Beijing considers "tertiary" --
3rd and lower -- generated 43% of the nation's GDP in 2004. By
contrast, 9% of Chinese live in what are considered 1st- and 2nd-tier
cities, which contributed 34% of GDP in 2004..."Although China's
National Tourism Administration has rated Days Hotel and Suites Jiaozuo
as five-star, the price for each room, at the opening, will be around
320 yuan, or about $41, less than half of what many peer hotels in major
cities charge. The low price is pegged to local spending power... the
hotel has resorted to cost-containing measures such as smaller rooms
than are standard for 5-star facilities and marble imported from the
Middle East rather than Italy."
China  Wal-Mart  IBM  hotels  internal_migration  inland 
march 2010 by jerryking
IBM - Insurance 2020: Innovating beyond old models
23 May 2006 | IBM Institute for Business Value studies | by
James Bisker who is the Global Insurance Industry Leader for the IBM
Institute for Business Value. He can be contacted at jbisker@us.ibm.com.
insurance  disruption  IBM  innovation 
february 2010 by jerryking
Personalized Weather Forecasts
December 12, 2006 | Technology Review | By Duncan Graham-Rowe.
An IBM supercomputer forecasts weather down to a one-kilometer
resolution.
weather  massive_data_sets  IBM  bespoke  personalization  hyperlocal  microtargeting 
january 2010 by jerryking
Fire Yourself -- Then Come Back and Act Like a New Boss Would
OCTOBER 9, 2006 | Wall Street Journal | by CAROL HYMOWITZ.
..."companies must repeatedly reinvent themselves to stay
strong...companies can't survive as they once did by churning out the
same products or services in the same way year after year. The most
successful companies don't wait until they're in trouble or are
overtaken by rivals to make changes. The trick is to analyze portfolios
constantly, to move quickly to shed weak businesses and to gamble on new
opportunities without making the company unstable...."Windows of
opportunity open and close so quickly today, you can't just mull
decisions right in front of you. You have to look around the corner and
figure out where you need to go,...learn how to change directions fast.
...
IBM  Intel  Andy_Grove  reinvention  opportunities  nimbleness  speed  agility  windows_of_opportunity  accelerated_lifecycles  portfolios  pre-emption  kill_rates  portfolio_management  unstable  instability  assessments_&_evaluations  Carol_Hymowitz 
december 2009 by jerryking
Compressed Data; I.B.M.'s Deep Blue Has a Business Plan
May 24, 1999 | The New York Times | By STEVE LOHR. He cited
precision weather forecasting as a current example of what deep
computing can do. Feeding information from the National Weather Service,
local sensors and topographical data bases into supercomputers, it has
now become possible to make pinpoint forecasts.

''Instead of saying there's a 40 percent chance of rain tomorrow
afternoon, you can say it will rain from 2:15 to 3:30 P.M.,'' Mr.
Pulleyblank said. ''And instead of making forecasts for the standard
30-kilometer grids, we can narrow them to one kilometer. The storms will
be in Queens, but not the Bronx.''
IBM  massive_data_sets  weather  Steve_Lohr  microtargeting 
november 2009 by jerryking
I.B.M. Unveils Software to Find Trends in Vast Data Sets - NYTimes.com
May 20, 2009 | New York Times | By ASHLEE VANCE. New software
from I.B.M. can suck up huge volumes of data from many sources and
quickly identify correlations within it. The company says it expects the
software to be useful in analyzing finance, health care and even space
weather.
data_mining  IBM  pattern_recognition  massive_data_sets  Ashlee_Vance  haystacks 
may 2009 by jerryking
IBM's Big Push into Business Consulting - BusinessWeek
April 16, 2009 | Business Week | by Steve Hamm

IBM sees rich opportunity to profit if it can help improve productivity
in sectors such as transportation, electric utilities, and health care.
"We're at the beginning of a new wave," says Kern. "We've begun to
instrument the world [with sensors and other devices that collect
information], but now we have to take that data and analyze it."
competingonanalytics  IBM  data_mining  analytics  sensors  Industrial_Internet  productivity  management_consulting 
april 2009 by jerryking
IBM Dives Into Water Venture - WSJ.com
MARCH 13, 2009, 7:21 A.M. ET, WSJ, by by WILLIAM M. BULKELEY.
Touting 'Smarter Planet,' Big Blue Pushes Technology to Manage Resources
water  IBM  water_footprints  smart_meters  infrastructure  smart_infrastructure 
march 2009 by jerryking
The mashups that let companies get creative with data
September, 5th 2006 - (c) 2006 The Financial Times Limited .By ALINE VAN DUYN -
WEB 2.0: Many businesses are seizing the potential of the easy combination of information from many sources
tools  IBM  Google  Web_2.0 
march 2009 by jerryking
At IBM, New Uses for Old Software - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 2, 2009, WSJ article by WILLIAM M. BULKELEY on how IBM
has been reusing software originally developed to spot Vegas card
counters to help immigration agencies around the globe track visa
applications and identify suspicious applicants who may be hiding an
unsavory past.
software  IBM  reuse  imagination 
february 2009 by jerryking
Big Blue's global reach
Jan. 26, 2009 G&M article by Randy Ray interviews Roy Glover, IBM's chief diversity officer, on IBM's approach to diversity.
IBM  diversity  UFSC 
january 2009 by jerryking
IBM’s Venture Capital Group « consultaglobal
Prepping for note to Bryon on IBM VC Group
IBM  VC 
july 2007 by jerryking

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