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jerryking : indian-americans   6

Novartis’s new chief sets sights on ‘productivity revolution’
SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 | Financial Times | Sarah Neville and Ralph Atkins.

The incoming chief executive of Novartis, Vas Narasimhan, has vowed to slash drug development costs, eyeing savings of up to 25 per cent on multibillion-dollar clinical trials as part of a “productivity revolution” at the Swiss drugmaker.

The time and cost of taking a medicine from discovery to market has long been seen as the biggest drag on the pharmaceutical industry’s performance, with the process typically taking up to 14 years and costing at least $2.5bn.

In his first interview as CEO-designate, Dr Narasimhan says analysts have estimated between 10 and 25 per cent could be cut from the cost of trials if digital technology were used to carry them out more efficiently. The company has 200 drug development projects under way and is running 500 trials, so “that will have a big effect if we can do it at scale”.......Dr Narasimhan plans to partner with, or acquire, artificial intelligence and data analytics companies, to supplement Novartis’s strong but “scattered” data science capability.....“I really think of our future as a medicines and data science company, centred on innovation and access.”

He must now decide where Novartis has the capability “to really create unique value . . . and where is the adjacency too far?”.....Does he need the cash pile that would be generated by selling off these parts of the business to realise his big data vision? He says: “Right now, on data science, I feel like it’s much more about building a culture and a talent base . . . ...Novartis has “a huge database of prior clinical trials and we know exactly where we have been successful in terms of centres around the world recruiting certain types of patients, and we’re able to now use advanced analytics to help us better predict where to go . . . to find specific types of patients.

“We’re finding that we’re able to significantly reduce the amount of time that it takes to execute a clinical trial and that’s huge . . . You could take huge cost out.”...Dr Narasimhan cites one inspiration as a visit to Disney World with his young children where he saw how efficiently people were moved around the park, constantly monitored by “an army of [Massachusetts Institute of Technology-]trained data scientists”.
He has now harnessed similar technology to overhaul the way Novartis conducts its global drug trials. His clinical operations teams no longer rely on Excel spreadsheets and PowerPoint slides, but instead “bring up a screen that has a predictive algorithm that in real time is recalculating what is the likelihood our trials enrol, what is the quality of our clinical trials”.

“For our industry I think this is pretty far ahead,” he adds.

More broadly, he is realistic about the likely attrition rate. “We will fail at many of these experiments, but if we hit on a couple of big ones that are transformative, I think you can see a step change in productivity.”
adjacencies  algorithms  analytics  artificial_intelligence  attrition_rates  CEOs  data_driven  data_scientists  drug_development  failure  Indian-Americans  kill_rates  massive_data_sets  multiple_targets  Novartis  pharmaceutical_industry  predictive_analytics  productivity  productivity_payoffs  product_development  real-time  scaling  spreadsheets  Vas_Narasimhan 
november 2017 by jerryking
Subscription Music Service Sounds a New Note: Profit - WSJ
By Ethan Smith
Updated June 30, 2017

NYC-based Saavn is a relative minnow among them, with 22 million monthly active users who are predominantly in India and seven nearby nations. To them it offers a free service with unlimited access to 30 million songs—both Indian and Western—in exchange for sitting through ads. Charts and playlists spotlight music from various regions, eras and artists, such as Bollywood star Shah Rukh Khan.

Outside South Asia, Saavn is subscription-only. For around $5 a month, users in the U.S., U.K. and about 200 countries gain access to 11 million songs, most of them Bollywood tunes and other Indian music. Users in India can pay 99 rupees (about $1.54) a month for an ad-free “pro” option.

The service also offers music from 10 artists it has signed directly to record label-style deals, along with 30 talk shows.
ad_supported  free  Bollywood  Spotify  Apple_Music  streaming  ethnic_communities  music  India  subscriptions  Indian-Americans 
june 2017 by jerryking
Why Indian Americans are Best at Bees - India Real Time - WSJ
June 2, 2012 | WSJ | By Visi Tilak.

“It’s stunning… The fact that Indians would ever win is noteworthy. The fact that they would win more than once is impressive,” Pawan Dhingra, a curator at the Smithsonian Institution’s Asian Pacific American Program, said in an interview on National Public Radio. “But the fact that they would win at such a dominating level becomes almost a statistical impossibility. It’s phenomenal, really. There is more than randomness going on.”
immigrants  spelling  students  children  Indian-Americans  randomness 
june 2012 by jerryking
Karma Capitalism
OCTOBER 30, 2006 | BusinessWeek | Pete Engardio.

The swami's whirlwind East Coast tour was just one small manifestation of a significant but sometimes quirky new trend: Big Business is embracing Indian philosophy. Suddenly, phrases from ancient Hindu texts such as the Bhagavad Gita are popping up in management tomes and on Web sites of consultants. Top business schools have introduced "self-mastery" classes that use Indian methods to help managers boost their leadership skills and find inner peace in lives dominated by work.

More important, Indian-born strategists also are helping transform corporations. Academics and consultants such as C. K. Prahalad, Ram Charan, and Vijay Govindrajan are among the world's hottest business gurus. About 10% of the professors at places such as Harvard Business School, Northwestern's Kellogg School of Business, and the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business are of Indian descent--a far higher percentage than other ethnic groups. "When senior executives come to Kellogg, Wharton, Harvard, or [Dartmouth's] Tuck, they are exposed to Indian values that are reflected in the way we think and articulate," says Dipak C. Jain, dean of the Kellogg School.
capitalism  China  C.K._Prahalad  emotional_mastery  India  Indian-Americans  inner_peace  philosophy  Ram_Charan  self-mastery  Vijay_Govindarajan 
april 2012 by jerryking
How to Win the Spelling Bee - WSJ.com
JUNE 3, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By JAMES MAGUIRE. You don't have to be Indian. But it seems to help.
education  aspirations  howto  spelling  students  contests  Indian-Americans  Indians 
june 2009 by jerryking

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