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jerryking : ivy_league   68

Opinion | The Surprising Path That Some Kids Take to the Ivy League
Aug. 24, 2019 | The New York Times | By Frank Bruni.

Overcoming life’s basic truth: Talent is universal, but opportunity is not.
career_paths  Colleges_&_Universities  Frank_Bruni  Ivy_League  nonprofit  philanthropy  resilience  strivers  unevenly_distributed  Zimbabwe 
august 2019 by jerryking
50 Years of Affirmative Action: What Went Right, and What It Got Wrong - The New York Times
By Anemona Hartocollis
March 30, 2019

Columbia and other competitive colleges had already begun changing the racial makeup of their campuses as the civil rights movement gained ground, but the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, and the resulting student strikes and urban uprisings, prompted them to redouble their efforts.

They acted partly out of a moral imperative, but also out of fear that the fabric of society was being torn apart by racial conflict. They took chances on promising black students from poor neighborhoods they had long ignored, in addition to black students groomed by boarding schools......The debate over race in college admissions only intensified. By the late 1970s, colleges began emphasizing the value of diversity on campus over the case for racial reparations.

Today, Harvard and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are facing legal challenges to race-conscious admissions that could reach the Supreme Court. The Trump administration is investigating allegations of discrimination against Asian-American applicants at Harvard and Yale. University officials who lived through the history fear that the gains of the last 50 years could be rolled back.
'60s  admissions  affirmative_action  African-Americans  anniversaries  Colleges_&_Universities  Columbia  diversity  dropouts  Ivy_League  MLK 
march 2019 by jerryking
‘Lopping,’ ‘Tips’ and the ‘Z-List’: Bias Lawsuit Explores Harvard’s Admissions Secrets
July 29, 2018 | - The New York Times | By Anemona Hartocollis, Amy Harmon and Mitch Smith.
=======================================
One tries very hard to assess the candidate’s potential. Is he or she a self-starter? How much help has he had? Has the candidate peaked? How will he or she react to not being head of the class?

Does he or she have the core values, confidence, perspective and flexibility to adapt and thrive? Not surprisingly, companies and others prefer applicants who have what a law firm where I later recruited called “a can-do attitude.”
===============================
........The case has been orchestrated by Edward Blum, a longtime crusader against affirmative action and voting rights laws, and it may yield him a fresh chance to get the issue before the Supreme Court. The court turned away his last major challenge to university admissions, Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, in 2016.

[Read: How other Ivy League schools are coming to Harvard’s defense.]

The debate goes back to the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s. The assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968 was a turning point, pushing colleges to redouble their efforts to be more representative of American society.

But Asians were an overlooked minority despite a long history of discrimination. .......The plaintiffs say that the personal rating — which considers an applicant’s character and personality — is the most insidious of Harvard’s admissions metrics. They say that Asian-Americans are routinely described as industrious and intelligent, but unexceptional and indistinguishable — characterizations that recall painful stereotypes for many people of Asian descent. (The applicant who was the “proverbial picket fence” was Asian-American.).........Professor Khurana, the Harvard College dean, acknowledged that Harvard was not always perfect, but said it was trying to get its practices right.

“I have a great deal of humility knowing that some day history will judge us,” Professor Khurana said. “I think that’s why we are constantly asking ourselves this question: How can we do better? How could we be better? What are we missing? Where are our blind spots?”
admissions  affirmative_action  Asian-Americans  blind_spots  Colleges_&_Universities  discrimination  diversity  Harvard  Ivy_League  lawsuits  race-blind  race-conscious  selection_processes  biases  elitism  ethnic_stereotyping  meritocratic  students  racial_disparities  1968  core_values 
august 2018 by jerryking
Donors should propel Oxford down the Ivy League diversity road
May 26, 2018 | Financial Times | David Lammy.

Elite Eastern institutions are using aggressive outreach campaigns to attract applicants who might otherwise be unaware of the schools’ generous financial-aid packages.
diversity  Colleges_&_Universities  outreach  Oxford  applicants  economically_disadvantaged  United_Kingdom  alumni  admissions  minorities  Black_British  donations  donors  Ivy_League 
may 2018 by jerryking
The Future of Elite Schools in the Trump Era (and the Future of Blogging) - The Atlantic
James Fallows
3:05 PM / April 14, 2018

a message that came in from a reader in an elite-university college town. (OK: It’s New Haven.) He says that an under-appreciated aspect of Donald Trump’s war on expertise deserves further attention. .....From where I sit, the schools are woefully under-prepared for the Trump onslaught and I predict that they will get slammed and have to change their policies. To imagine what future Harvard classes will look like if the schools lose the court cases, look to what happened to Berkeley when they were constrained by Proposition 209 from considering using affirmative action policies-- the percentage of Asian American and White students increased, while Black and Latino representation decreased.

When I think about the rise of Trump, I believe that part of the blame should rest at the feet of Harvard, Yale and their peers.

Clinton, Bush, and Obama stacked their administration with graduates from these schools and the global economic system that they created (and profited from) had important flaws that hurt certain sectors of the US and provided fertile ground for Trump's dark vision of a sort of economic conspiracy holding back real Americans. As a group, they often were arrogant and felt that they knew best. Yet they also weren't smart enough to understand how the economic world that they created actually had some fundamental flaws that would come to threaten the elite global world view that they thought was inevitable.
James_Fallows  elitism  Ivy_League  Colleges_&_Universities  Red_states  Donald_Trump  expertise  Department_of_Justice  admissions 
april 2018 by jerryking
Wall Street’s Endangered Species: The Ivy League Jock - WSJ
BY JUSTIN BAER

The industry started to shift away from athletes in the 1990s as derivatives grew in number and complexity. That necessitated a hiring spree for Ph.D.s who could understand and price them. More recently, the advent of electronic trading and quantitative investing called for many more recruits with math or computer-programming skills.
talent  athletes_&_athletics  Wall_Street  Ivy_League  quants  hiring  PhDs  trading  endangered 
may 2017 by jerryking
Goodbye, Ivory Tower. Hello, Silicon Valley Candy Store. - The New York Times
By STEVE LOHR SEPT. 3, 2016

A number of tech companies are luring Ivy League economists out of academia with the promise of big sets of data and big salaries.

Silicon Valley is turning to the dismal science in its never-ending quest to squeeze more money out of old markets and build new ones. In turn, the economists say they are eager to explore the digital world for fresh insights into timeless economic questions of pricing, incentives and behavior....Businesses have been hiring economists for years. Usually, they are asked to study macroeconomic trends — topics like recessions and currency exchange rates — and help their employers deal with them.

But what the tech economists are doing is different: Instead of thinking about national or global trends, they are studying the data trails of consumer behavior to help digital companies make smart decisions that strengthen their online marketplaces in areas like advertising, movies, music, travel and lodging.

Tech outfits including giants like Amazon, Facebook, Google and Microsoft and up-and-comers like Airbnb and Uber hope that sort of improved efficiency means more profit....“They are microeconomic experts, heavy on data and computing tools like machine learning and writing algorithms,”
Silicon_Valley  massive_data_sets  economists  Steve_Lohr  Airbnb  Hal_Varian  digital_economy  academia  microeconomics  Ivy_League  insights  consumer_behavior  war_for_talent  talent 
september 2016 by jerryking
Law Firm Imposes Ban on Hiring Ivy League Graduates - Law Blog - WSJ
Jul 15, 2015 LAWYERS & LAW FIRMS
Law Firm Imposes Ban on Hiring Ivy League Graduates
ARTICLE
COMMENTS (23)
ADAM LEITMAN BAILEY
IVY LEAGUE
4.3k 157
By JACOB GERSHMAN
law  law_schools  Ivy_League  new_graduates 
july 2015 by jerryking
Harvard Accused of Bias Against Asian-Americans
A complaint Friday alleged that Harvard University discriminates against Asian-American applicants by setting a higher bar for admissions than that faced by other groups. The complaint, filed by a…
Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  admissions  Asian-Americans  biases  elitism  achievement_gaps  ethnic_stereotyping  meritocratic  students  racial_disparities  Ivy_League 
may 2015 by jerryking
Is admission to an elite university the be-all and end-all? - The Globe and Mail
SIMONA CHIOSE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 03 2014

William Deresiewicz, the author of Excellent Sheep, argues that, rather than rejoice at being admitted to such institutions, this elite-in-training should run the other way. In tours to capacity lecture halls, the former Yale literature professor tells students to stop mistaking ambition for direction; and to embrace the liberal arts, self-reflection and risk. Otherwise, the anxiety and unhappiness those students feel now, after a childhood and adolescence stage-managed by their parents, will flower into midlife crises and the realization of an existence neither examined nor fulfilled.

But Dr. Deresiewicz is not a counsellor. He’s a combative writer, a regular at The New Republic. The race to the top, he argues, is not just a waste of the best minds of a generation (the Ys and Zs), who are going into economics with only the smallest detours into Plato, Virginia Woolf or George Eliot; it has turned education from the great equalizer to a sharp cleaver, lacerating democracy (jk: fault lines).
admissions  anxiety  Colleges_&_Universities  education  elitism  fault_lines  Ivy_League  liberal_arts  risk-taking  self-reflection  social_exclusion  unhappiness 
october 2014 by jerryking
Business School, Disrupted - NYTimes.com
MAY 31, 2014 | NYT | By JERRY USEEM.

The question: Should Harvard Business School enter the business of online education, and, if so, how?

In the Porter model, all of a company’s activities should be mutually reinforcing. By integrating everything into one, cohesive fortification, “any competitor wishing to imitate a strategy must replicate a whole system,” Professor Porter wrote.

In the Christensen model, these very fortifications become a liability. In the steel industry, which was blindsided by new technology in smaller and cheaper minimills, heavily integrated companies couldn’t move quickly and ended up entombed inside their elaborately constructed defenses.
HBS  deanships  disruption  Michael_Porter  competitive_strategy  steel  competitive_advantage  Clayton_Christensen  Colleges_&_Universities  Ivy_League  MOOCs  business_schools  Nitin_Nohria  blindsided  blind_spots 
june 2014 by jerryking
Diversity and Dishonesty - NYTimes.com
APRIL 12, 2014

Continue reading the main story
[Ross Douthat]

both cases illustrate, with their fuzzy rhetoric masking ideological pressure, is a serious moral defect at the heart of elite culture in America.

The defect, crucially, is not this culture’s bias against social conservatives, or its discomfort with stinging attacks on non-Western religions. Rather, it’s the refusal to admit — to others, and to itself — that these biases fundamentally trump the commitment to “free expression” or “diversity” affirmed in mission statements and news releases.

This refusal, this self-deception, means that we have far too many powerful communities (corporate, academic, journalistic) that are simultaneously dogmatic and dishonest about it — that promise diversity but only as the left defines it, that fill their ranks with ideologues and then claim to stand athwart bias and misinformation, that speak the language of pluralism while presiding over communities that resemble the beau ideal of Sandra Y. L. Korn.

Ross Douthat
diversity  freedom_expression  free_speech  Colleges_&_Universities  self-deception  censorship  Ivy_League  Mozilla  Brandeis  controversies  academic_freedom  Ayaan_Hirsi_Ali  discomforts 
april 2014 by jerryking
Genius New York High Schooler Accepted To All 8 Ivy League Schools
It seems like a lot of you don’t know how the college admission process works. You’re all talking about him “only” being ranked 11th in his class and only getting a 2250 on the SATs but th...
admissions  Colleges_&_Universities  race  Ivy_League  overachievers  high-achieving 
april 2014 by jerryking
‘Ebony and Ivy,’ About How Slavery Helped Universities Grow - NYTimes.com
October 18, 2013 | NYT | By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER.


Mr. Wilder, a history professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has a new book, “Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities,” which argues provocatively that the nation’s early colleges, alongside church and state, were “the third pillar of a civilization based on bondage.” ... Mr. Wilder, scholars say, seems to be the first to look beyond particular campuses to take a broader look at the role of slavery in the growth of America’s earliest universities, which, he argues, were more than just “innocent or passive beneficiaries” of wealth derived from the slave trade.

“Craig shows that what happened at one institution wasn’t simply incidental or idiosyncratic,” said James Wright, a former president of Dartmouth College, which is discussed in the book. “Slavery was deeply embedded in all our institutions, which found ways to explain and rationalize slavery, even after the formation of the American republic.”....“There has been a fear that there’s something lurking in the archives that will be devastating to these institutions, and that people doing this work are motivated by hostility,” Mr. Wilder said. “But history is a poor medium for seeking revenge.” ...“Before the Civil War, about half of the student body came from the South,” Ms. Sandweiss said. “What was it about this place that made people feel like it was a good place to send their sons?”
Lurking behind such historical questions, scholars say, is a more contentious contemporary one: What should universities do today to make African-Americans feel as if they fully belong?
antebellum  Ivy_League  elitism  Colleges_&_Universities  African-Americans  slavery  history  historians  archives  books 
october 2013 by jerryking
The Weekend Interview With Ben Nelson: The Man Who Would Overthrow Harvard - WSJ.com
August 9, 2013 | WSJ | By MATTHEW KAMINSKI.

Minerva a "reimagined university." Sure, there will be majors and semesters. Admission requirements will be "extraordinarily high," he says, as at the Ivies. Students will live together and attend classes. And one day, an alumni network will grease job and social opportunities.

But Minerva will have no hallowed halls, manicured lawns or campus. No fraternities or sports teams. Students will spend their first year in San Francisco, living together in a residence hall. If they need to borrow books, says Mr. Nelson, the city has a great public library. Who needs a student center with all of the coffee shops around?

Each of the next six semesters students will move, in cohorts of about 150, from one city to another. Residences and high-tech classrooms will be set up in the likes of São Paulo, London or Singapore—details to come. Professors get flexible, short-term contracts, but no tenure. Minerva is for-profit.

The business buzzword here is the "unbundling" of higher education, or disaggregation. Since the founding of Oxford in the 12th century, universities, as the word implies, have tried to offer everything in one package and one place. In the world of the Web and Google, physical barriers are disappearing.

Mr. Nelson wants to bring this technological disruption to the top end of the educational food chain, and at first look Minerva's sticker price stands out. Freed of the costs of athletics, the band and other pricey campus amenities, a degree will cost less than half the average top-end private education, which is now over $50,000 a year with room and board...."My first six months, what did the consulting firm teach me? They didn't teach me the basics of how they do business. They taught me how to think. I didn't know how to check my work. I didn't think about order of magnitude. I didn't have habits of mind that a liberal arts education was supposed to have given me. And not only did I not have it, none of my other colleagues had it—people who had graduated from Princeton and Harvard and Yale."
howto  thinking  Harvard  disruption  Colleges_&_Universities  Ivy_League  elitism  MOOCs  Minerva  Jason_Isaacs  unbundling  disaggregation  imagination  check_your_work  orders-of-magnitude 
august 2013 by jerryking
The Empirical Kids - NYTimes.com
Op-Ed Columnist
The Empirical Kids
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: March 28, 2013
David_Brooks  Colleges_&_Universities  Ivy_League 
march 2013 by jerryking
The Great Migration - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: January 24, 2013

Enrico Moretti writes in “The New Geography of Jobs,” the magnet places have positive ecologies that multiply innovation, creativity and wealth. The abandoned places have negative ecologies and fall further behind.
David_Brooks  Colleges_&_Universities  elitism  Ivy_League  internal_migration  books  multiplier_effect 
january 2013 by jerryking
The price of admission - FT.com
October 19, 2012 5:03 pm
The price of admission

Gillian Tett By Gillian Tett
admissions  Gillian_Tett  Ivy_League  Oxford  elitism  Colleges_&_Universities  SUNY  cutbacks  alumni 
october 2012 by jerryking
Blacks at the Nation's Top-Ranked Business Schools: Enrollments Are Down But Graduation Rates Are Almost Perfect
Winter 2005/2005


Blacks at the Nation's Top-Ranked Business Schools: Enrollments Are Down But Graduation Rates Are Almost Perfect
enrollment  African-Americans  business_schools  MBAs  Ivy_League  elitism 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Service Patch - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: May 24, 201

Is it a good thing that so many students at elite universities aspire to work at investment banks, consultancies, hedge funds and the like?
David_Brooks  career_paths  elitism  Colleges_&_Universities  Ivy_League  investment_banking  management_consulting  students 
may 2012 by jerryking
Neither Fools Nor Cowards - WSJ.com
May 13, 2005 | WSJ |By ELIOT A. COHEN.

"Pentagon accountants have totted up the savings that distance learning supposedly offers and convinced themselves and others that a couple of hours sitting alone, staring at a computer screen after a 14-hour workday, will yield the same educational benefit as a morning seminar with a dozen other senior professionals and an expert instructor."..."Recently, one defense official defended a proposal to shut down temporarily parts of the Army's advanced professional military educational system with the remark, "Some of the experiences they are getting today are better than anything they will get in a classroom. . . . It's not giving up something for nothing. We have a generation of leaders in the Army today that are battle-tested and are much more capable of leading the Army from the actual experience they have."

The stupidity of this last remark is as depressing, in its way, as the cravenness of the Columbia faculty senate's vote. It implies that knowing how to maneuver a battalion through an urban fight is the same thing as crafting a strategy for winning a counterinsurgency. It suggests that at least some at the top of the Pentagon do not understand that the next war will be as different from Iraq 2005 as Iraq was from Somalia, and Somalia from Panama, and Panama from Vietnam. Combat experience can indeed give us an army that can fight and win America's battles; but it is education that provides the intellectual depth and breadth that allows soldiers to understand and succeed in America's wars."
Colleges_&_Universities  education  Eliot_Cohen  humanities  Ivy_League  militaries  ROTC  scholar-officers  soldiers 
may 2012 by jerryking
College-Bound Cast Wider Net - WSJ.com
April 5, 2012 | WSJ |By JENNIFER LEVITZ, MELISSA KORN and SCOTT THURM
Colleges_&_Universities  admissions  Ivy_League 
april 2012 by jerryking
Out of Harvard, and Into Finance - NYTimes.com
December 21, 2011, 10:00 am
Out of Harvard, and Into Finance
By CATHERINE RAMPELL
Ivy_League  career  career_paths  finance  Colleges_&_Universities  Harvard  Yale  Princeton 
december 2011 by jerryking
How to Get Into Harvard - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 30, 2007 | WSJ | By ELLEN GAMERMAN.
A WSJ study finds that certain high schools have a remarkable record of
sending their students to elite colleges. Send to Jason, Asha &
Jazmin.
admissions  howto  Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  Ivy_League  high_schools 
august 2011 by jerryking
Harvard Radical
August 24, 2003 | The New York Times Magazine p28 col 01 (165 col)| by James Traub.

The fundamental reason Summers wants to change the undergraduate curriculum is that, as he explains, the nature of knowledge has changed so radically. Summers often says that one of the two most important phenomena of the last quarter-century is the revolution in the biological sciences. And yet, as he also often says, while it is socially unacceptable at an elite university to admit that you haven't read a Shakespeare play, no stigma at all attaches to not knowing the difference between a gene and a chromosome or the meaning of exponential growth. Summers compares this ignorance to the provinciality of never having traveled abroad. He wants every student to live in science for a while and not just to do some sightseeing in a course designed to help you ''think like a biologist.'' Summers is not categorically opposed to the ''ways of thinking'' approach. ''The hard question,'' he said, ''is the line between learning a lot of science in one area and surveying more broadly but less deeply and thus less close to the genuine professional enterprise.''
Larry_Summers  Harvard  Cornel_West  Henry_Louis_Gates  deanships  curriculum  leadership  Colleges_&_Universities  elitism  Ivy_League 
april 2011 by jerryking
Notes from a small world
Apr 29/May 6, 1996 | The New Yorker. Vol. 72, Iss. 10; pg. 87, 1
pgs | Patricia J. Williams. Harvard Law School graduated ten black
women in 1975, the most in its long history. Williams discusses these
ten women and examines how these first beneficiaries of affirmative
action feel now.
ProQuest  Harvard  law_schools  law_students  lawyers  African-Americans  women  affirmative_action  Ivy_League  elitism  HLS 
march 2011 by jerryking
A Well-Traveled Path From Ivy League to Supreme Court -
September 6, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By ADAM LIPTAK. About half
of the law clerks who have served the justices since Chief Justice John
G. Roberts Jr. joined the court in 2005 attended two law schools —
Harvard and Yale. Another quarter attended just four others — Virginia,
Stanford, Chicago and Columbia.
U.S._Supreme_Court  law_schools  elitism  Ivy_League  law_students  judges 
september 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - The Roots Of White Anxiety - NYTimes.com
July 18, 2010 | New York Times | by ROSS DOUTHAT. "...what
was striking, as Russell K. Nieli pointed out last week on the
conservative Web site Minding the Campus, was which whites were most
disadvantaged by the process: the downscale, the rural and the
working-class.......But cultural biases seem to be at work as well.
Nieli highlights one of the study’s more remarkable findings: while most
extracurricular activities increase your odds of admission to an elite
school, holding a leadership role or winning awards in organizations
like high school R.O.T.C., 4-H clubs and Future Farmers of America
actually works against your chances. Consciously or unconsciously, the
gatekeepers of elite education seem to incline against candidates who
seem too stereotypically rural or right-wing or “Red America.”
Colleges_&_Universities  elitism  Ivy_League  root_cause  admissions  working_class  reverse_discrimination  resentments  grievances  whites  rural  biases  stereotypes 
july 2010 by jerryking
What They're Doing After Harvard: The Weekend Interview with Wendy Kopp - WSJ.com
JULY 10, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By NAOMI SCHAEFER RILEY.
Teach for America now attracts 12% of all Ivy League seniors. The
program's founder explains why it beats working on Wall Street.
NaomiSchaeferRiley  Teach_for_America  Ivy_League  teaching  teachers  education  reform  Wall_Street 
july 2010 by jerryking
Do Elite Colleges Produce the Best-Paid Graduates?
July 20, 2009 | - Economix Blog - NYTimes.com | By Catherine Rampell
salaries  Colleges_&_Universities  Ivy_League  elitism 
july 2009 by jerryking
How Hillsdale Beats Harvard - WSJ.com
* JUNE 2, 2009

How Hillsdale Beats Harvard
The Ivy school sells out its 'principles.'

*
By WILLIAM MCGURN
Harvard  funding  Ivy_League  ROTC  militaries 
june 2009 by jerryking
The Disadvantages of an Elite Education
Summer 2008| The American Scholar|by William Deresiewicz

Our best universities have forgotten that the reason they exist is to make minds, not careers
Colleges_&_Universities  education  culture  introspection  Ivy_League  elitism  disadvantages 
march 2009 by jerryking

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