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Opinion | The Jim Crow South? No, Long Island Today
Nov. 21, 2019 | The New York Times |

White Americans have long found comfort believing that racial discrimination is a thing of the past.

Black Americans feel they know better, and a three-year investigation of Long Island real estate agents by the local newspaper Newsday provides the latest depressing evidence that they are right.

More than half a century after the great civil rights battles to end discrimination, the newspaper found that black home buyers are being steered to black neighborhoods and more closely scrutinized by brokers.

Newsday sent white investigators posing as buyers to meet with 93 real estate agents about 5,763 listings across Long Island. Then, they sent a second buyer — either black, Hispanic or Asian — to meet with the same agents. The practice is a gold-standard methodology known as “paired testing,” in which real estate agents are contacted by pairs of prospective clients with similar financial profiles.

Black testers were treated differently than white ones 49 percent of the time. Hispanic buyers encountered unequal treatment 39 percent of the time and Asian buyers 19 percent of the time.

Along with steering minority testers to majority-minority areas, and white testers to mostly white areas, some agents required black buyers to meet additional financial conditions that they didn’t demand of white buyers with the same profile.
African-Americans  editorials  Jim_Crow  housing  New_York  racism  racial_disparities  Fair_Housing_Act  Long_Island  pairs  racial_discrimination  real_estate  redlining  segregation 
november 2019 by jerryking
400 years since slavery: a timeline of American history
Fri 16 Aug 2019 07.00 BST Last modified on Fri 16 Aug 2019 07.57 BST | News | The Guardian by Khushbu Shah and Juweek Adolphe

This article drew on a number of books about the American history of slavery, including The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward E Baptist; American Slavery, 1619-1877 by Peter Kolchin; and Black Is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy by Nikil Pal Singh. It also used census data available online at census.gov.
African-Americans  anniversaries  books  disenfranchisement  Great_Migration  history  Jim_Crow  reparations  slavery  timelines  voter_suppression 
august 2019 by jerryking
In ‘Stony the Road,’ Henry Louis Gates Jr. Captures the History and Images of the Fraught Years After the Civil War
April 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Nell Irvin Painter.

STONY THE ROAD
Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow
By Henry Louis Gates Jr.
Illustrated. 296 pp. Penguin Press. $30.

Vergangenheitsbewältigung = coming to terms with the past — and it carries connotations of a painful history that citizens would rather not confront but that must be confronted in order not to be repeated.
20th_century  African-Americans  bigotry  books  book_reviews  disenfranchisement  Henry_Louis_Gates  historians  history  Jim_Crow  John_Hope_Franklin  KKK  lynchings  memorabilia  racial_politics  Reconstruction  stereotypes  torture  white_nationalism  white_supremacy  imagery  Vergangenheitsbewältigung  W.E.B._Du_Bois  iconic 
april 2019 by jerryking
Where Have All the Black-Owned Businesses Gone? - The Atlantic
BRIAN S. FELDMAN MAY 1, 2017

The last 30 years also have brought the wholesale collapse of black-owned independent businesses and financial institutions that once anchored black communities across the country. In 1985, 60 black-owned banks were providing financial services to their communities; today, just 23 remain. In 11 states where black-owned banks had headquarters in 1994, not a single one is still in business. Of the 50 black-owned insurance companies that operated during the 1980s, today just two remain.

Over the same period, tens of thousands of black-owned retail establishments and local service companies also have disappeared, having gone out of business or been acquired by larger companies. Reflecting these developments, working-age black Americans have become far less likely to be their own boss than in the 1990s. The per-capita number of black employers, for example, declined by some 12 percent just between 1997 and 2014.......the decline in entrepreneurship and business ownership among black Americans also is cause for concern. ...market concentration has played a role in suppressing opportunity and in displacing local economies. ...........The role of market concentration in inhibiting black-owned businesses is also troubling because of the critical role that such enterprises have played in organizing and financing the struggle for civil rights in America......The decline of black-owned independent businesses traces back to many causes, but a major one that has been little noted was the decline in the enforcement of anti-monopoly and fair-trade laws beginning in the late 1970s......Bob Dickerson, the CEO of the Birmingham Business Resource Center in Alabama, says, “Had our institutions and businesses been maintained, had that money been plowed back into our communities, it could have meant a world of difference.”

The role of market concentration in driving down the number of black-owned independent businesses becomes all the more concerning when one considers some mostly forgotten history. In principles, people, and tactics, the fight for black civil rights, going back to before the Civil War, was often deeply intertwined and aligned with America’s anti-monopoly traditions......The story of how the struggle for civil rights intertwined and intersected historically with the struggle against monopoly provides a lesson for the future. It suggests a need to recognize how political independence connects with economic independence in the struggle for social justice. Without freedom from domination in one sphere, there is no freedom in the other.
African-Americans  anticompetitive_behaviour  anti-monopoly  antitrust  black-owned  business  civil_rights  collapse-anxiety  corporate_concentration  economic_clout  economic_inclusion  economic_independence  enforcement  fair-trade  Jim_Crow  market_concentration  market_power  New_Deal  political_independence  segregation  societal_collapse 
may 2017 by jerryking
Black Lives, White Lies and Emmett Till - The New York Times
By THE EDITORIAL BOARDFEB. 6, 2017
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cold_cases  Jim_Crow  history  white_supremacy  killings  civil_rights  bigotry  Emmett_Till  the_South  FBI  lying  lynchings 
february 2017 by jerryking
The Horror of Lynchings Lives On - The New York Times
By THE EDITORIAL BOARDDEC. 3, 2016
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lynchings  the_South  cold_cases  Jim_Crow  history  killings  civil_rights  bigotry 
december 2016 by jerryking
Henry Louis Gates Jr.: Restoring Black History
SEPT. 23, 2016 | - The New York Times | By HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.

The opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington helps to resolve the protracted debate about the contributions of black people to American history and, indeed, about whether they had a history worth preserving at all. Those questions were at the heart of the nation’s original debate about whether, and how, black lives matter.....“History,” James Baldwin wrote, “is not merely something to be read. And it does not refer merely, or even principally, to the past. On the contrary, the great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do.”.... the opening of the museum ...reinscribes race at a symbolically central place in American culture, on the National Mall, where we celebrate our collective public histories, ensuring that a mountain of evidence about black contributions to America will be on permanent display....More than a museum, the building on the National Mall is a refutation of two and a half centuries of the misuse of history to reinforce a social order in which black people were enslaved, then systematically repressed and denied their rights when freed. It also repudiates the long and dismal tradition of objectifying black people in museums.
slavery  Jim_Crow  history  historians  Henry_Louis_Gates  museums  Washington_D.C.  African-Americans  Thomas_Jefferson  Enlightenment  Hegel  John_Hope_Franklin  W.E.B._Du_Bois  Carter_Woodson  Arthur_Schomburg  Obama  James_Baldwin  Smithsonian  David_Adjaye 
september 2016 by jerryking
Confederate Memorials as Instruments of Racial Terror - The New York Times
JULY 24, 2015 | NYT | By BRENT STAPLES.

In the wake of the Charleston massacre, for example, the parks and recreation board of Birmingham, Ala., voted to explore a proposal that would remove a 52-foot Confederate memorial from the entrance of a prominent park and place it with a Confederate heritage group.

Not all monuments warrant that kind of challenge. But those honoring the Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest deserve the backlash they have generated. Forrest presided over the 1864 massacre of Union soldiers, many of them black, at Fort Pillow in Tennessee. He was also a prominent slave trader and served as the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan.

Apologists argue that his involvement with the Klan was unimportant because he later adopted more enlightened views. But as the Forrest biographer Jack Hurst writes, by lending his name to the K.K.K. even temporarily, the general accelerated its development. “As the Klan’s first national leader,” Mr. Hurst writes, “he became the Lost Cause’s avenging angel, galvanizing a loose collection of boyish secret social clubs into a reactionary instrument of terror still feared today.”....Critics predictably condemn these efforts as bad-faith attempts to rewrite history. But what’s happening is that communities that were once bound and gagged on this issue are now free to contest a version of history that was created to reinforce racial subjugation.

They are reflecting on how to honor history — including the neglected history of African-Americans — and rightly deciding that some figures who were enshrined as heroes in the past do not deserve to be valorized in public places.
the_South  KKK  Confederacy  terrorism  white_supremacy  history  symbolism  race  African-Americans  Charleston_shootings  Reconstruction  race_relations  racial_discrimination  racial_segregation  racism  violence  Jim_Crow  race-baiting 
july 2015 by jerryking
Slavery’s Long Shadow - The New York Times
JUNE 22, 2015
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Paul Krugman
Paul_Krugman  slavery  Jim_Crow  racism  political_economy  Charleston_shootings 
june 2015 by jerryking
Isabel Wilkerson Reflects on the Black Lives Matter Movement
January 05, 2015 | Essence.com | Essay by Isabel Wilkerson.
Where Do We Go From Here?:

The outcomes in Staten Island and Ferguson and elsewhere signal, as in the time of Jim Crow, that the loss of Black life at the hands of authorities does not so much as merit further inquiry and that the caste system has only mutated with the times.From this, we have learned that the journey is far from over and that we must know our history to gain strength for the days ahead. We must love ourselves even if—and perhaps especially if—others do not. We must keep our faith even as we work to make our country live up to its creed. And we must know deep in our bones and in our hearts that if the ancestors could survive the Middle Passage, we can survive anything.
African-Americans  authors  Black_Lives_Matter  digital_advocacy  feedback_loops  Great_Migration  internal_migration  Isabel_Wilkerson  Jim_Crow  journalists  protests  protest_movements  Reconstruction  the_South  women 
may 2015 by jerryking
Forcing Black Men Out of Society
By Matt Guest

We can even go so far as to say that whites will cheer for their favorite black athletes, but they won't necessarily introduce themselves to the new black family that just moved to th...
race_relations  African-Americans  discomforts  visceral  fear  Jim_Crow 
april 2015 by jerryking
The sinister side of a Civil War surplus shop in Georgia - The Globe and Mail
OMAR EL AKKAD
The sinister side of a Civil War surplus shop in Georgia
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Apr. 08 2015

just across the street from that museum is an even more iconic Kennesaw landmark – a run-down, Old West saloon-looking building whose ground-floor porch is draped with myriad flags of the Confederacy. This is Wildman’s place: part store, part “museum.”

Inside, the cramped, dusty enclosure looks like someone’s overstuffed attic. Massive, multivolume sets of Civil War history sit alongside bizarre, self-published diatribes detailing the grand plans of the Illuminati. There’s a flimsy, plastic clock designed to count down to President Barack Obama's last day in office; there’s a big sign above the cluttered hovel of a cash register that reads: “White Trash.”

But move further into the store – to the very back, into an area described as a museum – and you’ll find something far more sinister. The walls and shelves are lined with grotesquely racist depictions of black people, complete with all the usual tropes – big lips, watermelons, the works. There’s shrines to the Klan, to white power.
Omar_el_Akkad  Civil_War  the_South  retailers  history  white_supremacy  Georgia  Jim_Crow  racism  collectibles  Confederacy 
april 2015 by jerryking
Why Reconstruction Matters - NYTimes.com
By ERIC FONER MARCH 28, 2015

Reconstruction also made possible the consolidation of black families, so often divided by sale during slavery, and the establishment of the independent black church as the core institution of the emerging black community. But the failure to respond to the former slaves’ desire for land left most with no choice but to work for their former owners.

It was not economic dependency, however, but widespread violence, coupled with a Northern retreat from the ideal of equality, that doomed Reconstruction. The Ku Klux Klan and kindred groups began a campaign of murder, assault and arson that can only be described as homegrown American terrorism. Meanwhile, as the Northern Republican Party became more conservative, Reconstruction came to be seen as a misguided attempt to uplift the lower classes of society.
African-Americans  disenfranchisement  segregation  Jim_Crow  the_South  Reconstruction  slavery  emancipation  Civil_War  KKK  terrorism  violence 
march 2015 by jerryking
Return to Self-Reliance
August 13, 1997 | Wall Street Journal | Jason L. Riley

A sad truth of late-20th-century black history is the lack of emphasis black leaders have placed on economic independence, opting instead to funnel resources toward integrating predominantly white institutions, be they political, corporate or educational. Such was not always the thinking; indeed, blacks left bondage with a very different mind-set.

"When you think back to the situation right after the Emancipation Proclamation, African-Americans did a couple things coming right out of slavery," Mr. Price said recently in an interview. "They started up colleges and they started up businesses, like independent farms and burial societies that led to the creation of insurance companies. And as black folks moved into the cities, they started everything that came with living there--barber shops, grocery stores, hotels."

Part of the reason blacks were able to do these things despite the racial barriers of Reconstruction and, later, Jim Crow, was the guidance and support of individuals such as Booker T. Washington. The pre-eminent black leader of the late 1800s and early 1900s, Washington was a shrewd self-help advocate and educator, and a relentless promoter of black economic independence. In 1901, the black novelist Pauline Hopkins called him "probably the most talked of Afro-American in the civilized world today."

A famous William Johnson painting of Washington shows the former slave addressing a class full of attentive black children. The blackboard behind him depicts a plow, a shovel, books and writing instruments--symbolizing the "tools" Washington realized were essential to the postslavery progress of his race. Demonstrating a keen understanding of the central role money and wealth accumulation play in advancing a people, Washington said: "No race that has anything to contribute to the markets of the world is long in any degree ostracized."
Jason_Riley  African-Americans  conservatism  Booker_T._Washington  Emancipation  capital_formation  capital_accumulation  self-help  civil_rights  education  self-reliance  Jim_Crow  economic_empowerment  generational_wealth  institutions  desegregation  history  Reconstruction  leaders 
september 2012 by jerryking
A More Honest History Lesson
July 31, 1989 | TIME | Edward M. Gomez.

the little museum has become one of the most innovative and carefully watched institutions of its kind in the U.S. Embracing the city's past in the belief that no part of it should be overlooked, the Valentine relates the "story of a real city,instead of some abstraction." notes the monthly Richmond Review. Through an intelligent and careful study of the Jim Crow era. it helps audiences understand the thinking of those who practiced the unacceptable.
history  Richmond  African-Americans  segregation  Jim_Crow  the_South  Reconstruction  museums  exhibitions 
september 2012 by jerryking
They Had More Than a Dream - WSJ.com
January 14, 2004 | WSJ | By STEPHEN PROTHERO.
Jim_Crow  MLK  book_reviews 
april 2012 by jerryking
Book Review: America's Great Debate - WSJ.com
April 22, 2012| WSJ |By DAVID S. REYNOLDS

Statesmanship In a Divided Era
Fisticuffs on the floor of Congress, Southern threats of secession, saber-rattling over slavery in new states. And then: compromise.
slavery  Jim_Crow  the_South  Confederacy  statesmanship  books  book_reviews 
april 2012 by jerryking
Reason in Disrepair - WSJ.com
November 22, 2002 | WSJ | By ALLEN GUELZO.
Reparations for slavery were one of the first concerns raised by blacks after emancipation in 1863. They have since come to address, along with slavery, Jim Crow, race riots, and other indignities and cruelties heaped upon black Americans in the days before the Civil Rights movement. Reparations are not, on their face, simply a dismissible idea or merely a partisan one. If we recognize any force in the arguments in favor of reparations for the Holocaust or for the interning of Japanese-Americans during World War II, then there's nothing illogical about considering some form of reparations to American blacks.

The key word is "considering." That suggests some kind of dispassionate review of facts, arguments and strategies. None was in evidence at "Forty Acres and a Mule," a reparations conference last week at Columbia University in New York, where I was a panelist. The word "reparations" can mean many things depending on one's point of view: restitution, reinstatement, restoration. At Columbia it meant one thing: rage.

Any kind of reasonable discussion at the conference was trumped, and trumped big-time, by anger. Some panelists spoke of vague, global reparations for racism toward all blacks everywhere, so vague that one questioner from the audience tried to pin down a panelist by asking: "Yes, but who's going to write me the check?" Other panelists cast their demands in the language of personal therapy. One complained of the "pain" he experienced from centuries of subjugation, without explaining just how reparations were going to ease that pain.
reparations  slavery  Emancipation  Civil_War  rage  African-Americans  personal_therapy  Jim_Crow  indignities 
march 2012 by jerryking
The G.O.P.’s ‘Black People’ Platform - NYTimes.com
January 6, 2012 | NYT | Letters to the editor in reaction to an article by CHARLES M. BLOW
Progressive Power
Florida

Todays GOP is in large part the same constituency that made up the Dixiecrats during Jim Crow...and the old Democrat Plantation owners who formed the confederacy and committed treason against the United States -a crime for which they were never held fully accountable nor punished even by confiscation of their ill-earned Manses...the Southern Strategy is , sadly, alive and well...with a nation-wide appeal to frustrated whites seeking a scapegoat .
This vitriol is made all the more dynamic by having an African-American President who serves as a lightning rod for all their pent up hatred....(BTW: Isnt it interesting that they never point out that our president is also half white-Irish , no less!)

Jan. 7, 2012 at 5:09 p.m.
Recommended25

Claire
Chevy Chase MD

This reminds me of the slave owners who while watching their slaves in the fields, would complain about how slow and lazy the slaves were.

If white people had less wealth than any other group in the US, we might wonder how the hell could that be? As white people we have dominated every piece of legislation, directed wealth to our own communities, decided who can or cannot participate in government... had our schools and residences built by black people while denying them use and entrance (except to clean), even though we forced them to pay taxes for public buildings and services, we prohibited their use, we told them they were inferior, ran from communities when they 'integrated' our neighborhoods, encouraged European immigrants to discriminate against black people, only gave them the lowest paying, most dangerous jobs, while closing our country club doors to them.

How in hell could black people not be at the bottom of the socio-economic ladder? We've created a world where those of us with white skin have been given every advantage and privilege. The generational wealth alone of whites will keep black people at the bottom for centuries.

Jan. 7, 2012 at 5:09 p.m.
letters_to_the_editor  Charles_Blow  GOP  African-Americans  slaveholders  white_privilege  generational_wealth  Southern_strategy  constituencies  Dixiecrats  Jim_Crow 
january 2012 by jerryking
Her Formula for Success - WSJ.com
APRIL 23, 2003|WSJ|By NICHOLAS VON HOFFMAN.
HER DREAM OF DREAMS

By Beverly Lowry
(Knopf, 481 pages, $27.50)

To appreciate Madam Walker's accomplishments, you have to know what she was up against. The barriers of sex, tough as they were, do not compare with those of race. Post-slavery America, Madam's America, was a society of unremitting violence toward black people. Readers will learn, for instance, that when toting up the annual white-on-black killing statistics, the statisticians of the time paused to ponder whether a man who had a heart attack running from the dogs set on him belonged in the lynched, murdered or accidental-death column.
heart_attacks  personal_care_products  segregation  women  trailblazers  African-Americans  moguls  book_reviews  C.J.Walker  the_South  Jim_Crow  hair  personal_grooming  entrepreneur  racial_violence  lynchings  terror 
november 2011 by jerryking
Why Herman Cain is the Perfect Racist
October 10, 2011 | Your Black Politics: | by Dr. Boyce Watkins,Syracuse University.
blogs  Herman_Cain  African-Americans  GOP  Jim_Crow  Campaign_2012 
october 2011 by jerryking
The Help | Senna | 1960s Racism in Black and White - WSJ.com
AUGUST 12, 2011

'The Help': '60s Racism in Black and White
Splendid Davis, Spencer provide some nuance; striking, vivid 'Senna' speeds over a few details

By JOE MORGENSTERN
movies  the_South  Jim_Crow  '60s  race_relations  racism 
august 2011 by jerryking
The Racist Scourge - NYTimes.com
The Racist Scourge
By ROGER COHEN
Published: August 1, 2011
racism  South_Africa  Judaism  Roger_Cohen  Jim_Crow 
august 2011 by jerryking
Silks, Saddles and Discrimination
May 5, 2011 | The Root | By: Richard T. Watkins
Jim_Crow  African-Americans 
may 2011 by jerryking
Book Review: The Warmth of Other Suns; Fly Away - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 4, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by JOHN
STAUFFER. The Great Northern Migration: Long after Emancipation,
African-Americans found another kind of freedom. Stauffer reviews (1)
The Warmth of Other Suns
By Isabel Wilkerson Random House 622 pages, $30 and (2) Fly Away By
Peter M. Rutkoff and William B. Scott Johns Hopkins, 408 pages, $45
Jim_Crow  African-Americans  book_reviews  internal_migration  Great_Migration 
september 2010 by jerryking
The Great Migration and Isabel Wilkerson book review : The New Yorker
September 6, 2010 | The New Yorker | by Jill Lepore who
reviews “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great
Migration” (Random House; $30); Isabel Wilkerson;
migrants  African-Americans  book_reviews  literature  history  Jim_Crow  internal_migration  Isabel_Wilkerson  Great_Migration 
september 2010 by jerryking
Books of The Times - Isabel Wilkerson’s Sweeping ‘Warmth of Other Suns’ - NYTimes.com
By JANET MASLIN
Published: August 30, 2010
THE WARMTH OF OTHER SUNS The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration By Isabel Wilkerson 622 pages. Random House. $30.
Jim_Crow  migrants  African-Americans  book_reviews  internal_migration  Great_Migration 
august 2010 by jerryking
Separation Anxiety
Nov. 30, 2007 WSJ op-ed by by ABIGAIL THERNSTROM AND STEPHAN
THERNSTROM. Column looks at whether historically black colleges are good
for blacks.
education  African-Americans  Colleges_&_Universities  segregation  HBCUs  Jim_Crow  graduation_rates 
january 2009 by jerryking
Amazon.com: Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black ...
Wall Street Journal bureau chief Blackmon gives a
groundbreaking and disturbing account of a sordid chapter in American
history—the lease (essentially the sale) of convicts to commercial
interests between the end of the 19th century and well into the 20th.
19th_century  African-Americans  books  convicts  groundbreaking  incarceration  Jim_Crow  slavery  the_South 
january 2009 by jerryking

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