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John Doyle: This is no time to take a vacation from the news
AUGUST 21, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | JOHN DOYLE .

Today the volume of political news can be overwhelming, with crazy events amping up the news cycles ....There is genuine fatigue – and that's understandable – but it's wrong. The temptation is to twist all Trump-related news into one big tumbleweed of tedious acrimony and let it blow away. At this particular time of the year, a lot of people are on vacation and there is aversion to the ill-temper of it all. Best ignore the news, say many people....ignore it at our peril.....I was put in mind of the late Rob Ford, the former Toronto mayor.

Just a few years ago, in this neck if the woods, citizens of Toronto felt they were living in bewildering times. Analysis was beggared by the news as it unfolded – the Rob Ford fandango of revelations, accusations, apologies and freakouts. It was exhausting to watch, let alone cover it. Often, TV and print media covered the Ford situation by relying on the usual menu of some expert pontificating on the marketing and selling of politicians. This was comically useless in the Ford situation. There was no playbook. There were no rules. Does that ring a bell of recognition?....Mr. Ford held sway with his many supporters because, in part, he knew that in the digital age, a portion of the electorate only dips in and out of the news narrative. There's a bunch of people who don't know or care what's real and what's merely sensational half-truths or biased opinion – that became starkly evident during the Ford years in Toronto.

It's important not to be one of those people, not to give in to fatigue and tune out news coverage. If you paid close attention to the Ford phenomenon, you could see what was coming in the politics practised during the digital age. Rob Ford merely insulted the intelligence. Donald Trump is doing far worse than that. Pay attention.
John_Doyle  news  Rob_Ford  Donald_Trump  fatigue  politics  playbooks  pay_attention 
september 2017 by jerryking
Peter Mansbridge anchors his final edition of CBC’s The National - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 30, 2017

Last September, when Mansbridge announced his retirement, I wrote a column with the headline It’s About Time: We’ve Put Up With Mansbridge And His Pompous Ilk For Too Long. It acknowledged at the start that it might seem ungracious and harsh.

It argued against the traditional anchor position, which Mansbridge has embodied, and declared that the reverence for the job is outdated and, essentially, redundant.

About half the readers thought it too harsh and about half applauded the content. It caused some hurt feelings. Sometimes a critic does that, expressing the unsentimental view.

Oddly enough, CBC seems to be agreeing with the views expressed about the traditional anchor role and is moving away, post-Mansbridge, to a multihost format rather than anchoring The National in one middle-aged man who delivers the news.

Whatever the new format might be, Peter Mansbridge will be missed by many. Understandably, given his skills and achievements.

Cheers, Pastor, and may the retirement be pleasant and fruitful.
Peter_Mansbridge  farewells  retirement  CBC  unsentimental  television  journalists  Canada150  John_Doyle 
july 2017 by jerryking

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