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14-Year-Olds Code App That Cleans Up India’s Streets - WSJ
By JEFF ELDER
June 25, 2015

The Bangalore teens are among 43 girls and young women, on 10 teams from around the world, competing for $20,000 in seed funding. Wednesday, they pitched their apps, and business plans, to a panel of five female tech executives....The goal of the competition, now in its sixth year and organized by the education nonprofit Iridescent, is to spark interest in tech entrepreneurship among pre-college girls. Nearly half of the girls who participate, organizers say, intend to major in computer-related studies. Over the six years, more than 5,000 girls from more than 30 countries have taken part....Organizers asked the girls to create a mobile app that addresses local challenges. Finalists took on childhood obesity, sports concussions, drunken driving, and water waste as well as waste disposal.
coding  software  girls  mobile_applications  Silicon_Valley  entrepreneurship  STEM  Junior_Achievement 
june 2015 by jerryking
Young Bay Street drives new wave of philanthropy - The Globe and Mail
TIM KILADZE
Young Bay Street drives new wave of philanthropy
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Dec. 04 2014
Bay_Street  philanthropy  Junior_Achievement 
december 2014 by jerryking
An Economic Statecraft Model - NYTimes.com
By DAVID ROHDE
Published: May 7, 2013

The Obama administration’s efforts in the region should be more economic than military. “The United States government has done a terrible job of focusing on economic issues in the Middle East,” Thomas R. Nides, a former deputy secretary of state, told me recently. “You have huge youth unemployment and no hope.”

This argument is hardly new. “To succeed, the Arab political awakening must also be an economic awakening,” Mrs. Clinton said, more than a year ago. “Economic policy is foreign policy,” her successor, John Kerry, said this week.

Last month he asked Congress to approve the creation of a $580 million “incentive fund” that would reward countries in the Middle East and North Africa for enacting reforms that foster market-based economies, democratic norms, independent courts and civil societies.
Africa  statecraft  foreign_aid  foreign_policy  economic_policy  Arab-Muslim_world  Junior_Achievement  economic_warfare 
may 2013 by jerryking
A New U.S. International Economic Strategy - WSJ.com
February 5, 2013 | WSJ | by Robert Zoellick.

A New U.S. International Economic Strategy
Taking the lead on trade and open markets can enhance global security, opportunity and the prospects for liberty.

(1) First, this country should strengthen its continental base by building on the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico.
(2) the extraordinary monetary policies of late, led by the Federal Reserve's continued near-zero interest-rate policy, are taking us into uncharted territory.
(3)the U.S. needs to break the logjam on opening markets.
(4)Fourth, gender equality is not only fair and right—it is smart economics.
(5) Finally, the U.S. needs to match growth priorities of developing economies.
globalization  international_trade  Robert_Zoellick  NAFTA  IMF  WTO  economic_policy  gender_gap  entrepreneurship  Junior_Achievement  infrastructure 
february 2013 by jerryking
Growing at a Smart Pace
Growing at a Smart Pace

What Every CEO Should Know About Creating New Businesses
1 Ultimately, growth means starting new businesses.
Most firms have no alternative. Sectors decline, as they did for Pullman’s railroad cars and Singer’s sewing machines. Technology renders products and services obsolete—the fate Polaroid suffered, as digital cameras decimated its instant photography franchise. Markets saturate, as Home Depot is now finding, after establishing more than a thousand stores nationwide.
2 Most new businesses fail.
3 Corporate culture is the biggest deterrent to business creation.
New ventures flourish best in open, exploratory environments, but most large corporations are geared toward mature businesses and efficient, predictable operations.
4 Separate organizations don’t work—or at least not for long.
5 Starting a new business is essentially an experiment.
6. New businesses proceed through distinct stages, each requiring a different
7. New business creation takes time--a lot of time.
8. New businesses need help fitting in--"bridging"--with established systems and structures.
9. The best predictors of success are market knowledge and demand-driven products and services.
10. An open mind is hard to find.
growth  Thomas_Stewart  HBR  CEOs  Junior_Achievement  hard_to_find  start_ups  failure  organizational_culture  experimentation  trial_&_error  life_cycle  tacit_data  entrepreneurship  dedication  obsolescence  demand-driven  infrastructure  new_businesses  bridging  large_companies  customer-driven  market_saturation  Home_Depot  Fortune_500  mindsets  open_mind  decline  Michael_McDerment  Polaroid  digital_cameras 
december 2012 by jerryking
Real-World Advice for the Young
04.11.05 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard.

We owe our young people ...a set of "road rules" for the real world.

Purpose. Every young person needs to know that he was created for a purpose. ...I would, however, argue that there is also an economic purpose to our lives. It is to discover our gifts, make them productive and find outlets for their best contribution.

Priorities. The best single piece of advice from Peter Drucker: Stop thinking about what you can achieve; think about what you can contribute (to your company, your customers, your marriage, your community). This is how you will achieve. Enron had an achievement-first culture; it just achieved the wrong things...how many schools teach young people to think in terms of contribution?

Preparation. Lest you think I'm urging young people down a Mother Teresa-like path of self-sacrifice, I'm not. The task is to fit purpose and contribution into a capitalistic world. There is a crying need for prepared young people who can thrive in a realm of free-market capitalism. This great system works magnificently, but it doesn't work anything like the way it's taught in most universities. In the real world, the pie of resources and wealth is not fixed; it is growing all the time. In the real world, the game is not rigged and static; rather, money and talent move at the speed of light in the direction of freedom and opportunity. In the real world, greed is bad (because it takes your eye off customers), but profits are very good. Profits allow you to invest in the future. In the real world, rising living standards do not create pollution. Instead, they create an informed middle class that wants and works to reduce pollution.

Pan-global view. The economy is global.... There is no going back.

Partner. Many of the great startups of the last 30 years began as teams of two...Behind this phenomenon is a principle: Build on your strengths. To mitigate your weaknesses--and we all have them--partner up! Find your complement.
Perseverance. Young people are smarter and more sophisticated today. It's not even close. My own generation's SAT scores look like they came out of baseball's dead-ball era. But apart from the blue-collar kids who are fighting in Iraq, most American kids today are soft. That's a harsh statement, isn't it? But cultural anecdotes back it up. Kids weigh too much. Fitness is dropping. Three American high schoolers ran the mile in under four minutes in the 1960s. It's been done by one person since. Parents sue coaches when Johnny is cut from the team. Students sue for time extensions on tests. New college dorms resemble luxury hotels. College grads, unable to face the world, move back in with their parents and stay for years.

Does this sound like a work force you'd send into combat against the Chinese?
in_the_real_world  Rich_Karlgaard  advice  Peter_Drucker  youth  students  entrepreneurship  partnerships  rules_of_the_game  purpose  globalization  Junior_Achievement  perseverance  millennials  serving_others  priorities  preparation  profits  greed  fitness  talent_flows  capital_flows  static  risk-mitigation  complacency  blue-collar  Chinese  capitalism  self-sacrifice  young_people  anecdotal 
august 2012 by jerryking
Kids need jobs, not basketball
July 18, 2012 | Toronto Sun | By Megan Harris.

If political and community leaders really want to help young people in troubled neighborhoods break the cycle of high unemployment, teenage pregnancy and poverty that provide fertile breeding environments for gangs, they should stop building basketball courts and recreation centres.

Throwing taxpayer dollars at recreation centres and basketball gives these political leaders a false sense of accomplishment....What kids living in these communities need at a very early stage of their lives are opportunities to expand their horizons beyond their immediate surroundings and community.
African_Canadians  basketball  false_sense_of_accomplishment  Junior_Achievement  politicians  pregnancies  role_models  teenagers  Toronto  unemployment  young_people  youth 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Measure of Success
February 1996 | Across the Board | Brian McWilliams. About using a balanced scorecard.
(1) Profits are a lousy star to steer by. These organizations are attempting to navigate by a constellation of measures--including customer satisfaction, quality, innovations, employee development, and of course, financial soundness.
(2) Use scorecards that focus the organization on carefully chosen, "actionable" measures--things that business line managers and their employees can influence directly, such as customer satisfaction, yield and reliability.
(3) Any collection of non financial measures, will be the product of compromises. The information that's most strategic--how customers view you vs. competitors, for example--is nearly impossible to gather.And information that is readily available--your cost of processing an invoice, for example,doesn't tend to be highly strategic.
(4) Resource allocations are often subjective decisions, with the squeakiest wheels sometimes getting the grease. Most important, a single-minded focus on financial yardsticks doesn't ensure that investments are aligned with long-term corporate strategy.
metrics  boards_&_directors_&_governance  balanced_scorecard  Octothorpe_Software  actionable_information  Junior_Achievement  UFSC  measurements 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Power of Nursing - NYTimes.com
May 16, 2012, 7:00 am
The Power of Nursing
By DAVID BORNSTEIN

Ideas For expanding the KPMG/UFSC/JA Company program from 333 Bay to other neighbourhoods.
nursing  Junior_Achievement  ideas  UFSC 
may 2012 by jerryking
Which TD branches open Sunday » Banks in Canada
Over 300 TD Canada Trust branches across Canada will be open from Noon to 4pm. 7 Day banking
TD_Bank  Junior_Achievement  banking 
march 2012 by jerryking
CMO Council: Marketing Magnified October 2011
very few feel their campaigns are highly evolved on a local level.
localization  TD_Bank  Junior_Achievement 
march 2012 by jerryking
The latest shade of green – zero energy use - The Globe and Mail
erica ruth kelly
Special to Globe and Mail Update (Includes Correction)
Published Monday, Dec. 19, 2011

Since 1990, the Friends of the Environment Foundation at Toronto-Dominion Bank has helped fund more than 19,000 environmental projects with the aim of helping Canadian communities to reduce, reuse and recycle. ..."“With the big banks pulling in the profits they are, there is greater pressure to create and preserve a positive brand, without succumbing to the criticism of ‘greenwashing,’” he says. Branding itself as a green bank “attracts loyal customers and employees because they are going a step further than the conventional green initiatives.” "
CSR  Junior_Achievement  green  TD_Bank 
january 2012 by jerryking
At Apple's Grand Central Store, iPhones Aren't the Only Draw - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 9, 2011 | WSJ | By JESSICA E. VASCELLARO and IAN SHERR
Apple's Hottest New Product Can Be Thrown in the Wash
Fans Collect Company's T-Shirts, Kept in Limited Supply; 'Star Trek' Model
T-Shirts  Junior_Achievement  Apple  retailers  Jessica_E._Vascellaro  superfans 
january 2012 by jerryking
Threadless: The Business of Community - Multimedia case
06/30/2008
Length:
45 min
Product Type:
Multimedia
Source:
Harvard Business School
Threadless.com, the online, Chicago-based t-shirt company, was not your typical fashion apparel company. The company, run by Jake Nickell, Jacob DeHart, and Jeffrey Kalmikoff, turned the fashion business on its head by enabling anyone to submit designs for t-shirts and asking its community of more than 500,000 members to help select winning designs. Threadless encouraged community members to actively participate by critiquing submitted designs, blogging about their daily lives, posting songs and videos inspired by the designs, and, most important, purchasing t-shirts that have won the weekly design competitions. In 2007, Threadless was well on its way to selling more than a million and a half t-shirts. Threadless' success had garnered significant media attention, the New York Times and USA's National Public Radio highlighting its unique community-based business model, and had piqued the interest of large traditional retailers. Nickell, DeHart, and Kalmikoff were now faced with making a decision about a potentially lucrative offer from a major retailer offering to carry large volumes of select Threadless t-shirts in its retail stores. Should they accept?
Threadless  T-shirts  Junior_Achievement  marketing  web_video  Ivey  community-based 
december 2011 by jerryking
At Apple's Grand Central Store, iPhones Aren't the Only Draw - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 9, 2011 | WSJ By JESSICA E. VASCELLARO and IAN SHERR.
Apple's Hottest New Product Can Be Thrown in the Wash
Fans Collect Company's T-Shirts, Kept in Limited Supply; 'Star Trek' Model
Apple  apparel  T-Shirts  retailers  Junior_Achievement  Jessica_E._Vascellaro 
december 2011 by jerryking
A New Way to Teach Entrepreneurship – The Lean LaunchPad at Stanford: Class 1 « Steve Blank
A New Way to Teach Entrepreneurship – The Lean LaunchPad at Stanford: Class 1
Posted on March 8, 2011 by steveblank
Junior_Achievement  entrepreneurship  teaching  business_planning  lean 
december 2011 by jerryking
Selection Criteria: What does this mean?: Resilience
What interview questions could you ask to assess resilience?

Our workplace is characterised by multiple demands, shifting priorities, short deadlines. This environment can be stressful. What do you do to keep on top of things, to refresh yourself, when working in such an environment?
Tell us about one of the most challenging obstacle you have faced at work? Include what the obstacle was, how you went about dealing with it, and what you learnt from the experience.
As a team leader, it will be important to stay positive when faced with challenges. Tell us about a time when you had to find a way to be positive in the face of something that other staff saw as negative. How did go about achieving this?
Describe the working environment of your current job. How does it demand resilience from you?
criteria  Junior_Achievement  questions  resilience  screening  selection_processes 
november 2011 by jerryking
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