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june 2018 by jerryking
A new industry has sprung up selling “indoor-location” services to retailers
Dec 24th 2016 | Economist

Tracking technologies are ingenious. Some flash out a code to smartphone cameras by means of LED lighting; others, such as IndoorAtlas, a startup with headquarters in California and Finland, monitor how devices disrupt a store’s geomagnetic field. With smartphone ownership rising, the market for tracking phones indoors could grow fivefold between now and 2021, to a total of $23bn, says Research and Markets, a market-research firm.

What do retailers hope to gain? The answer depends on how far they push the technology. On the most basic level, a store might notice that people often walk from “frozen goods” to “alcohol”, and then bring the two closer together. A retailer could also gain more insight into which departments are best at promoting goods—all without knowing anything about shoppers beyond where their legs take them.

If stores can persuade clients to reveal personal information, too, they stand to profit more......Apple and Google are beginning to offer indoor-location services to retailers that use the motion sensors already in handsets. These can see where their owners are, and where they are moving to, using a map of existing Wi-Fi or radio-frequency signals. Shops would not need to set up systems to follow their customers’ phones.
location_based_services  mapping  new_industries  tracking  shopping_malls  retailers  Walkbase  LBMA  IndoorAtlas  foot_traffic  Wi-Fi  Aisle411  Apple  Google  indoors 
september 2017 by jerryking
Amazon-Backed TrackR Locates $50 Million in New Round - WSJ
By Patience Haggin
Aug. 2, 2017

TrackR’s integration features include the ability to let users ask Alexa to help them locate an item. It also powers Alexa’s phone-finder skill.

In addition tracker tags that fit on keychains or inside wallets, TrackR said it plans to ship later this year its Atlas device, which plugs into wall sockets, to help people locate lost items within their homes more precisely. For example, someone could place the devices in the living room, kitchen and bedroom and then ask Alexa, “What room are my keys in?” Alexa would recommend where to go.

TrackR faces competition from similar offerings from corporate giants like the HTC Fetch and Motorola Keylink, as well as venture-backed startups like Chipolo Inc. and Tile Inc., which has also raised about $60 million.
Amazon  Alexa  TrackR  location_based_services  LBMA 
september 2017 by jerryking
Feeding the parking meter a thing of the past - The Globe and Mail
PETER NOWAK
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
SEPTEMBER 5, 2017
SEPTEMBER 4, 2017

Most cities with similar apps have seen adoption levels in the single digits, according to Ian Maher, vice-president of strategic planning and IT for Toronto Parking Authority, which runs the Green P spaces. Toronto's high acceptance is the result of the Green P app being intuitive and easy to use, as well as a general tech-savviness among drivers, he says. "We have a lot of people who are app crazy."

Developed by Charlotte-based Passport Inc., the app has users enter their parking location's numerical code, which is found on curbside meters. They then select the desired amount of time and the corresponding fee is deducted from the money they load into their account via a credit card. The app sends a notification when time is about to expire and allows for extensions if necessary.

On the enforcement side, officers can look up a licence plate number on a hand-held device to see if a car is paid up, or check a location ID for an overall list of authorized vehicles in a specific area.
parking  Green_P  LBMA  location_based_services  mobile_applications  Toronto  TPA 
september 2017 by jerryking
7 Closing Strategies to Double Your Average Sale Size
August 11 | Entrepreneur Magazine | Marc Wayshak - GUEST WRITER
Your success depends on closing bigger, better deals. Put your time and energy into prospects with the power to make large investments and introduce you to others who can do the same.

1. Get over your fear.
Many salespeople are simply too scared to sell to huge companies...... large companies face the same problems as your small customers do, just on a bigger scale. This means they need a bigger version of your solution -- and they have the budget to match. Get over your fear.

2. Stand apart from the crowd.
High-level prospects hear from an average of 10 salespeople every day. If you do what everyone else is doing, you’ll never get through to them or earn their trust. To double your average sales size, you must be intentional about standing apart from the crowd in your industry. While others pitch, you should ask questions. While others are enthusiastic, you should be low-key and genuine. While your competitors focus on their products, you should focus on your prospect’s deepest frustrations and show how you can solve them.

3. Stop selling to low-level prospects.
Selling low-level prospects harms your close rate and decreasing your average sale size. Low-level prospects simply don’t have the power or budget to tell you “yes." They’re not the decision-makers. If you want to increase the size of your sales, stop selling to prospects who lack the budget to invest in your solution.

4. Sell to decision-makers.
It’s a best practice to head straight to the top of the food chain and sell to directors, vice presidents, and C-level executives. They have the power and budget to say “yes” to your offer. If someone refers you back down the chain, you’re still landing an introduction to the right person -- by his or her boss, no less.

5. Stop cold-calling.
Cold calls are miserable. Try implementing a sales-prospecting campaign. Plan your calls, letters and emails as follow-ups to a valuable letter or package you send via FedEx. This could be a special report, unique sample or company analysis. These intentional, repeated touches over a series of months will set you up as a familiar name by the time you actually get your prospect on the phone. When a huge sale is on the line, you can afford to invest time and money to catch a single prospect’s attention.

6. Know the decision-making process.
If you’ve closed only small deals at small companies in the past, you might be accustomed to working with just one or two decision-makers at a time. In large corporations, the decision-making process can be much more complicated. One of the biggest mistakes salespeople make is failing to understand the decision-making process. Get a grasp of this early on, and you can stay in front of the right people, build value for them and close your sales at higher prices.

7. Leverage sales for introductions.
When you close one large sale at a big organization, don’t stop there. Ask new customers for introductions to others in their company or network who could benefit from your offering. You have nothing to lose by asking for introductions, but failure to do so will cost you massive opportunity and revenue.
Gulliver_strategies  sales  fear  large_companies  differentiation  sales_cycle  buyer_choice_rejection  cold_calling  referrals  prospects  JCK  executive_management  campaigns  Aimia  LBMA  strategic_thinking  close_rate  questions  thinking_big  enterprise_clients  C-suite  low-key  authenticity  doubling  the_right_people 
august 2017 by jerryking
Retail sales per square foot in decline | Retail Dive
Daphne Howland
@daphnehowland
PUBLISHED

Aug. 1, 2017

Which stores to close can be a tricky decision, though, because of how offline stores add to online sales. Moody's Investors Service last year warned that closing a physical location reduces a retailer’s presence in the market area and noted that online sales often decrease in zip codes surrounding a shuttered store. It behooves mall landlords and retailers to leverage new technologies and new math to account for that, in order to make educated decisions, according to Hongwei Liu, CEO and co-founder of Mappedin, an indoor wayfinding platform for premium North American malls.

"Fortress mall operators are under heavy scrutiny, along with the rest of their industry," he told Retail Dive in an email. "Everyone knows retail space is overbuilt in the U.S., shares are down 35% from a year ago. Our mall customers, who are almost exclusively premium operators, say that 'rents are up, sales are up, occupancy is up' in 2017. Flush with cash but seeing depressed market valuations, hostile takeover bids are increasing. Anecdotally, more is being invested in technology and consumer experiences to 'recapture' (or re-demonstrate) the value that premium malls and retailers are creating."
MappedIn  shopping_malls  retailers  Apple  Tiffany  LBMA  anecdotal  sales_per_square_foot 
august 2017 by jerryking
Your Roomba May Be Mapping Your Home, Collecting Data That Could Be Sold
JULY 25, 2017 | The New York Times | By MAGGIE ASTOR.

High-end models of Roomba, iRobot’s robotic vacuum, collect data as they clean, identifying the locations of your walls and furniture. This helps them avoid crashing into your couch, but it also creates a map of your home that iRobot is considering selling to Amazon, Apple or Google.

Colin Angle, chief executive of iRobot, told Reuters that a deal could come in the next two years, though iRobot said in a statement on Tuesday: “We have not formed any plans to sell data.”

In the hands of a company like Amazon, Apple or Google, that data could fuel new “smart” home products.

“When we think about ‘what is supposed to happen’ when I enter a room, everything depends on the room at a foundational level knowing what is in it,” an iRobot spokesman said in a written response to questions. “In order to ‘do the right thing’ when you say ‘turn on the lights,’ the room must know what lights it has to turn on. Same thing for music, TV, heat, blinds, the stove, coffee machines, fans, gaming consoles, smart picture frames or robot pets.”

But the data, if sold, could also be a windfall for marketers, and the implications are easy to imagine. No armchair in your living room? You might see ads for armchairs next time you open Facebook. Did your Roomba detect signs of a baby? Advertisers might target you accordingly.... iRobot said that it was “committed to the absolute privacy of our customer-related data.” Consumers can use a Roomba without connecting it to the internet, or “opt out of sending map data to the cloud through a switch in the mobile app.”

“No data is sold to third parties,” the statement added. “No data will be shared with third parties without the informed consent of our customers.”
data  mapping  privacy  location_based_services  LBMA  advertising  smart_homes  iRobot  homes  home_appliances  home_automation  home_based  informed_consent 
july 2017 by jerryking
Mobile Ad Targeting Is Improving, According to Nielsen - WSJ
By JACK MARSHALL
Nov. 22, 2016

Ad targeting accuracy varied based on the demographic groups that campaigns were aimed at, however. For example, desktop ads performed better than mobile ads when targeting broader age ranges.

Conversely, Nielsen said mobile campaigns were more effective in connecting with narrower audiences. For example, for campaigns aimed at people aged between 18 and 34, 63% of mobile ads reached their intended demographic target, compared with 53% on desktop.

Despite advances in targeting technology, Nielsen said it remains highly unlikely that digital ad campaigns could ever achieve a 100% on-target percentage, because of consumer behaviors such as misrepresenting their age or gender, or sharing digital devices with family and friends.
mobile_phones  smartphones  advertising  targeting  LBMA  Nielsen  consumer_behavior  misrepresentation  demographic_information 
february 2017 by jerryking
Facebook Is Rolling Out a Handful of New Measurement Tools for Advertisers – Adweek
By Marty Swant|September 21, 2016

Third-party partnerships help track sales, lift and clicks
Facebook  LBMA  Tune  measurements  omnichannel  effectiveness  tools  partnerships 
february 2017 by jerryking
Buy, buy, baby
Sep 13th 2014 | The Economist

The advertising industry is going through something akin to the automation of the financial markets in the 1980s. This has helped to make advertising much more precise and personalised. Some advertising agencies and media companies have told their executives to read “Flash Boys” by Michael Lewis, a book about Wall Street’s high-speed traders, to make quite sure they get the message......Real-time bidding sounds high-tech but straightforward. When a consumer visits a website, his browser communicates with an ad server. The server sends a message to an exchange to provide data about that user, such as his IP address, his location and the website he is visiting. Potential ad buyers send their bids to the exchange. The highest one wins and an ad is served when the website loads. All this typically takes about 150 milliseconds.

In reality, though, the ad-tech ecosystem is stupefyingly complex. Luma Partners, an investment bank, has put together the "Lumascape", a bafflingly crowded organisational chart showing several hundred firms competing in this market. Sellers of advertising space often go through technology firms: a "supply-side platform" (SSP) helps publishers sell their inventory, and a "demand-side platform" (DSP) gives access to buyers. Many choose a data-management platform (DMP) to store and buy information about users.

Advanced behavioural targeting, which uses technology to reach specific users with the desired characteristics, helped advertisers increase their return on investment by 30-50%. One popular tactic is "retargeting", which allows advertisers to look for people who have visited their website before and show them an ad related to an item they were looking for but did not buy.
online_advertising  programmatic  advertising  advertising_agencies  LBMA  behavioural_targeting  location_based_services  automation  real-time  algorithms  ad-tech  auctions  ROI 
february 2017 by jerryking
Asia to lead digital travel market in 2017
Booking flights hotels and tours

ProQuest: Future of Digital Travel (2010-2019)
Asia_Pacific  travel  market_sizing  China  e-commerce  LBMA 
july 2016 by jerryking
Big sports teams look to small startups for tech edge | CIO
startup community for technologies that can enhance the fan experience and improve business operations, on and off the field.
LBMA  accelerators  incubators  Mondelez 
may 2016 by jerryking
Stadiums race to digitize: How sports teams are scrambling to keep Millennials coming to games - TechRepublic
There are three reasons that stadiums are pushing to improve connectivity:

1. Changing demographics
2. Luring fans away from their big-screen TV at home
3. Boosting revenues

Whether by building from scratch or retrofitting existing facilities, stadiums are in a fierce competition with each other to add the latest technologies.
millennials  sports  LBMA  technology  stadiums  arenas 
may 2016 by jerryking
Five ‘no regrets’ moves for superior customer engagement | McKinsey & Company
July 2012
Five ‘no regrets’ moves for superior customer engagement
By Tom French, Laura LaBerge, and Paul Magill
engagement  customer_engagement  LBMA  McKinsey  no_regrets 
may 2016 by jerryking
Tech Keeps Kansas City Soccer Fans Engaged, Even If the Game Doesn’t | WIRED
AUTHOR: JEFF BECKHAM. JEFF BECKHAM CULTURE DATE OF PUBLICATION: 06.12.12.
06.12.12
soccer  fans  fan_engagement  LBMA  engagement  sports 
may 2016 by jerryking
Why many high-performing sports teams are losing money at the gate - Vision Critical Blog
February 25, 2015
By Chris Bondarenko

Here are four reasons why many high performing teams aren’t seeing the financial gains they once enjoyed:

1. MOST TEAMS LACK AN EMOTIONAL CONNECTION WITH FANS.

...If sports teams want to stop losing money at the gates, they need to better understand what triggers the passion of fans and integrate them into the brand experience. Teams can only do that if they truly know their fans. Building that connection requires showing fans that they matter—that the team cares and is listening to them—and will in turn deliver on that brand experience.

2. IN-PERSON EXPERIENCE DOESN’T MATCH FANS’ CONSUMPTION HABITS.

If teams want fans to become more engaged, they need to go where the fans are—the digital realm. Fans today simply do not consume sports in the same way they used to. Teams need to catch up....online consumption of sports videos grew 388 percent year-over-year from 2013 to 2014. Mobile and social consumption among fans is also growing rapidly....The rise of cloud, mobile and social technologies means sports teams need to reconsider not just how they’re distributing their content but also how they’re connecting with fans. The tools teams use to interact with people must be congruent and complementary to the habits, behavior and expectations of the empowered fan.

3. TEAMS FAIL TO ENGAGE FANS CONTINUOUSLY.

A study on fan loyalty revealed that although sports are seasonal, most fans follow their teams throughout the entire year, even in the off-season.. during preseason and the trade deadline....Teams need a game plan on how to engage with their fans consistently.

4. FANS DON’T FEEL HEARD AND UNDERSTOOD.only 45 percent of fans agreed their teams are interested in hearing their opinions. Even more troubling: only 33 percent agreed that that their teams listens to their opinion.

The lack of engagement is dangerous because fan loyalty isn’t what it used to be. Twenty-two percent of sports fans we talked to said they are willing to switch teams, while 30 percent admitted to already doing so in the past year.
fans  fan_engagement  LBMA  sports  gate_revenue  NBA  MLB  rugby  emotional_connections 
april 2016 by jerryking
5 Spectacular Marketing Insights From Cirque du Soleil On Customer Intimacy | momentology
By Lisa Lacy, 21st of April 2016 at 14:05 PM.

So how does Cirque du Soleil use get closer to its fans? Here are five marketing insights from Derricks.

1. Be Ready To Ask & Re-Ask Questions

the live entertainment brand isn’t the new kid on the block anymore....undergoing a huge transformation as a result in part of private investment firm TPG acquiring a majority stake last year.

“And what’s fascinating is this inflection point is a chance to re-ask all the questions,” Derricks said. “Everything is back on the table again. Our brand is incredibly strong on stage, but where we’re challenged is what happens beyond the lights and how to interact with you.”

2. Don’t Miss The Marketing Basics
it’s hard for a brand like Cirque du Soleil to simply deliver an app or the like, so “given the crowded market, there’s a lot of basic blocking and tackling as much as finding the next brand new thing. Sometimes it’s about being in the right place at the right time.”

That means Cirque du Soleil capitalizes on traditional out-of-home tactics like taxi toppers and marquis ads, as well as videos in taxis to create awareness and buzz.

3. Have Smaller Conversations & Tell Stories

Derricks said the brand is hearing from its fans that they want to know more about the performers and what goes on behind the scenes.

“Where we’re challenged is selling the concept of the show itself,” Derricks said. “The most radical thing we can do is to be more intimate. I don’t know if we can be louder, but we can be more intimate and [and bring you] behind the curtain, which is a fascinating new adventure for Cirque du Soleil.

4. Bring People To You

Another part of Cirque du Soleil’s marketing strategy involves breaking down the shows into their component parts and connecting with audiences from there....As a result, the brand has begun experimenting with master classes in fields like makeup and dance.

5. Conduct Team Building Activities

What’s more, noting the circus itself has changed drastically as traditional circuses included acts in which performers were related by blood and were therefore very tightly knit, Derricks said Cirque du Soleil, which includes groups of performers without family ties, had to conjure up its own unique methods of fostering trust....As a result, Cirque du Soleil created Spark Sessions, or corporate experiences for networking, business development and/or milestones, to get other companies involved and to help teach what it has since learned about trust and leadership, "
private_equity  TPG  Guy_Laliberté  entrepreneur  fascination  Cirque_du_Soleil  customer_experience  storytelling  customer_intimacy  LBMA  out-of-home  teams  trustworthiness  brands  insights  outreach  live_performances  corporate_training  inflection_points 
april 2016 by jerryking
The path to enlightenment and profit starts inside the office
(Feb. 2, 2016): The Financial Times | John Thornhill.

Competition used to be easy. That is in theory, if not always in practice. Until recently, most competent companies had a clear idea of who their rivals were, how to compete and on what field to fight.

One of the starkest - and scariest - declarations of competitive intent came from Komatsu, the Japanese construction equipment manufacturer, in the 1970s. As employees trooped into work they would walk over doormats exhorting: "Kill Caterpillar!". Companies benchmarked their operations and market share against their competitors to see where they stood.

But that strategic clarity has blurred in so many industries today to the point of near-invisibility thanks to the digital revolution and globalisation. Flying blind, companies seem happier to cut costs and buy back their shares than to invest purposefully for the future. Take the European telecommunications sector. Not long ago most telecoms companies were national monopolies with little, or no, competition. Today, it is hard to predict where the next threat is going to erupt.

WhatsApp, the California-based messaging service, was founded in 2009 and only registered in most companies' consciousness when it was acquired by Facebook for more than $19bn in 2014. Yet in its short life WhatsApp has taken huge bites out of the lucrative text messaging markets. Today, WhatsApp has close to 1bn users sending 30bn messages a day. The global SMS text messaging market is just 20bn a day.

Car manufacturers are rapidly wising up to the threat posed by new generation tech firms, such as Tesla, Google and Uber, all intent on developing "apps on wheels". Chinese and Indian companies, little heard of a few years ago, are bouncing out of their own markets to emerge as bold global competitors.

As the driving force of capitalism , competition gives companies a purpose, a mission and a sense of direction. But how can companies compete in such a shape-shifting environment? There are perhaps two (partial) answers.

The first is to do everything to understand the technological changes that are transforming the world, to identify the threats and opportunities early.

Gavin Patterson , chief executive of BT, the British telecoms group, says one of the functions of corporate leaders is to scan the horizon as never before. "As a CEO you have to be on the bridge looking outwards, looking for signs that something is happening, trying to anticipate it before it becomes a danger."

To that end, BT has opened innovation "scouting teams" in Silicon Valley and Israel, and tech partnerships with universities in China, the US, Abu Dhabi, India and the UK.

But even if you foresee the danger, it does not mean you can deal with it. After all, Kodak invented the first digital camera but failed to exploit the technology. The incentive structures of many companies are to minimise risk rather than maximise opportunity. Innovation is often a young company's game.

The second answer is that companies must look as intensively inwards as they do outwards (e.g. opposing actions). Well-managed companies enjoy many advantages: strong brands, masses of consumer data, valuable historic data sets, networks of smart people and easy access to capital. But what is often lacking is the ambition that marks out the new tech companies, their ability to innovate rapidly and their extraordinary connection with consumers. In that sense, the main competition of so many established companies lies within their own organisations.

Larry Page, co-founder of Google, constantly urges his employees to keep being radical. In his Founders' Letter of 2013, he warned that companies tend to grow comfortable doing what they have always done and only ever make incremental change. "This . . . leads to irrelevance over time," he wrote.

Google operates a 70/20/10 rule where employees are encouraged to spend 70 per cent of their time on their core business, 20 per cent on working with another team and 10 per cent on moonshots. How many traditional companies focus so much on radical ventures?

Vishal Sikka, chief executive of the Indian IT group Infosys, says that internal constraints can often be far more damaging than external threats. "The traditional definition of competition is irrelevant. We are increasingly competing against ourselves," he says.

Quoting Siddhartha by the German writer Hermann Hesse, Mr Sikka argues that companies remain the masters of their own salvation whatever the market pressures: "Knowledge can be communicated. Wisdom cannot." He adds: "Every company has to find its own unique wisdom." [This wisdom reference is reminiscent of Paul Graham's advice to do things that don't scale].

john.thornhill@ft.com
ambitions  brands  breakthroughs  BT  bureaucracies  competition  complacency  constraints  Fortune_500  incentives  incrementalism  Infosys  innovation  introspection  irrelevance  large_companies  LBMA  messaging  mission-driven  Mondelez  moonshots  opposing_actions  organizational_culture  outward_looking  Paul_Graham  peripheral_vision  radical  risk-avoidance  scouting  smart_people  start_ups  staying_hungry  tacit_knowledge  technological_change  threats  uniqueness  unscalability  weaknesses  WhatsApp  wisdom  digital_cameras  digital_revolution  historical_data 
april 2016 by jerryking
TV broadcasters look for a happy medium to keep sports fans engaged - The Globe and Mail
DAVID SHOALTS
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 18, 2016

Many of these fans would have little to no memory of the Blue Jays’ World Series runs in 1992 and 1993, so it is an encouraging sign for both broadcasters and sports teams – laggards, such as the Edmonton Oilers and Toronto Maple Leafs, can count on their fans being there when they finally get back into contention.

But that is small consolation for Rogers, which has to find a way to break even on its 12-year, $5.2-billion deal with the NHL for the Canadian broadcast rights. The bad news is that, since the Leafs have the largest fan base of the seven Canadian NHL teams, their plummeting TV ratings over the past two seasons have caused much pain for Rogers. Worse still, going into what ought to be a postseason ratings and advertising-revenue bonanza, the media company is facing the prospect of a playoff season without a single Canadian franchise. That is devastating to its budget projections and reportedly is already having an effect on staffing levels.

Kaan Yigit, president of Solutions Research Group in Toronto, says the NHL has gained consumers who have started to follow the league on digital and social media in recent years. But the communications and technology consultant adds that the gains did not offset the losses of conventional TV viewers. By December of 2015, an SRG survey of 500 Canadians showed, the number of Canadians aged 12 and above who consume the NHL on digital and social media increased 9 per cent, but in the same period, the number watching on television dropped 22 per cent. Over all, there was an 11-per-cent decline in Canadians who watch the NHL on any platform.
sports  broadcasting  fans  engagement  fan_engagement  LBMA  millennials  viewers  NHL  bad_news 
march 2016 by jerryking
Effect of time and location on sports fan engagement using mobile - Mobile Commerce Daily - Columns
January 28, 2016


John McCauley is vice president and general manager of OneUp Sports
By John McCauley
location_based_services  LBMA  sports  engagement 
march 2016 by jerryking
Ryerson University and Rogers Update Next Big Idea in Sport Competition - Sportscaster Magazine
launch of a new national competition to help realize tech opportunities in sports applications

A number of such techno-sporting possibilities were on display during the event as Ryerson, in partnership with Rogers Communications, launched the first ever Next Big Idea in Sport Competition.

The competition will now provide up to 10 selected start-ups with four months of mentoring and support and the chance to win cash prizes totaling $100,000.

That’s to encourage start-up companies to explore innovation opportunities in the sports business, including anything from analytics, athletic performance technologies, analysis of business management, fan engagement, consumer experiences and media innovation.....Rogers is keen to inspire students and start-ups to develop new and creative solutions for athletes, coaches, teams, sport media and even professional sports leagues,
Ryerson  Rogers  sports  LBMA  analytics  start_ups 
march 2016 by jerryking
Sourcing External Technology for Innovation
Sourcing External Technology for Innovation
By
Stewart Witzeman
Gene Slowinski
Ryan Dirkx
Lawrence Gollob
John Tao
Susan Ward
Sal Miraglia
Mondelez  LBMA 
march 2016 by jerryking
How to Avoid the Innovation Death Spiral | Innovation Management
By: Wouter Koetzier

Consider this all too familiar scenario: Company X’s new products developed and launched with great expectations, yield disappointing results. Yet, these products continue to languish in the market, draining management attention, advertising budgets, manufacturing capacity, warehouse space and back office systems. Wouter Koetzier explores how to avoid the innovation death spiral....
Incremental innovations play a role in defending a company’s baseline against competition, rather than offering customers superior benefits or creating additional demand for its products.
Platform innovations drive some market growth (often due to premium pricing rather than expanded volume), but their main function is to increase the innovator’s market share by giving customers a reason to switch from a competitor’s brand.
Breakthrough innovations create a new market that the innovator can dominate for some time by delivering new benefits to customers. Contrary to conventional wisdom, breakthrough innovations typically aren’t based upon major technological inventions; rather, they often harness existing technology in novel ways, such as Apple’s iPad.......A recent Accenture analysis of 10 large players in the global foods industry over a three-year period demonstrates the strategic costs of failure to innovate successfully. Notably, the study found little correlation between R&D spending and revenue growth. For instance, a company launching more products than their competitors actually saw less organic revenue growth. That’s because the company made only incremental innovations, while its competitors launched a balanced portfolio of incremental, platform and breakthrough innovations that were perceived by the market as adding value.
Accenture  attrition_rates  baselines  breakthroughs  correlations  disappointment  downward_spirals  howto  incrementalism  innovation  kill_rates  life_cycle  portfolios  portfolio_management  platforms  LBMA  marginal_improvements  Mondelez  moonshots  new_products  novel  product_development  product_launches  R&D  taxonomy 
march 2016 by jerryking
Anchors Away: Malls Lose More Department Store Tenants - WSJ
By LIAM PLEVEN
Updated Feb. 23, 2016

The rise of online shopping and changing consumer habits are battering the big department stores known as anchors that once lured shoppers to malls—leaving landlords with empty space and forcing them to undertake expensive overhauls to stay relevant.
shopping_malls  commercial_real_estate  retailers  LBMA  e-commerce 
february 2016 by jerryking
Definitive ways brands can harness the Internet of Things - iMediaConnection.com
Jessica Groopman
Contact
Follow this authorRSSTwitter Media Planning & Buying Posted on March 10, 2015
Industrial_Internet  Altimeter  brands  LBMA  location_based_services 
february 2016 by jerryking
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