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jerryking : las_vegas   11

A Man for All Markets by Edward O. Thorp
by Edward Thorp, a mathematician who applied his skills, from Las Vegas to Wall Street, from the blackjack tables to the world of hedge funds.
books  hedge_funds  Las_Vegas  mathematics  quantitative  Wall_Street 
march 2019 by jerryking
Business Book of the Year 2017 — the longlist
AUGUST 13, 2017 by: Andrew Hill.

One question for the judges is how durable they think the authors’ analyses of 2017’s shifting technological landscape will prove to be. The jury is expected to give preference to those books “whose insights and influence are most likely to stand the test of time”.

* Tom Friedman, whose bestseller on globalisation was the first Business Book of the Year in 2005. Thank You For Being Late, his latest, extends the thesis, linking personal stories to an analysis of the state of business, innovation, economics and world politics.
* Satya Nadella’s Hit Refresh (written with Greg Shaw and Jill Tracie Nichols) is an upbeat, first-hand account of his effort to devise a successful second act for Microsoft — almost unprecedented in the world of big technology — after the software company missed the mobile revolution.
* Brian Merchant’s The One Device dives deep into the making of Apple’s iPhone, on its 10th anniversary.
* Brad Stone’s The Upstarts, about Airbnb and Uber, narrowly missed this year’s longlist.
* Wild Ride, Adam Lashinsky’s lively analysis of Uber’s rise.
* Self-driving cars — one of the technologies being explored by Uber — feature in Vivek Wadhwa’s The Driver in the Driverless Car (written with Alex Salkever).
* Ellen Pao’s Reset (out next month) tackles the red-hot topic of diversity in Silicon Valley — or lack of it — recounting her experience as venture capitalist and chief executive of Reddit, the social platform.
* Jonathan Taplin’s Move Fast and Break Things, which examines the “monopoly platforms” built by Facebook, Google, Amazon and others and how they have “cornered culture”.
* Near-misses for the longlist included: Franklin Foer’s soon to be published critique of the tech sector World Without Mind; Machine, Platform, Crowd (the latest from 2014 shortlisted authors Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee); and The Fuzzy and the Techie by Scott Hartley. Mr Hartley’s book on the relevance of the liberal arts in a tech-led world was born from a proposal that made the final of last year’s Bracken Bower Prize for budding younger authors.
* The Wisdom of Finance by Mihir Desai, which uses literature, history, movies and philosophy to shed light on dry financial theories.
* A Man for All Markets, by Edward Thorp, a mathematician who applied his skills, from Las Vegas to Wall Street, from the blackjack tables to the world of hedge funds.
* Andrew Lo’s Adaptive Markets, a critique of the “efficient markets hypothesis”
* Sheelah Kolhatkar’s Black Edgedescribes how Steven Cohen’s former hedge fund, SAC Capital, built its Wall Street dominance before facing insider trading charges.
* David Enrich’s The Spider Network offers a comprehensive account of the Libor rate-rigging scandal.
* Janesville, by journalist Amy Goldstein, which explores the deeper social — and political — impact of business decisions on ordinary working people. She digs into what happened to people in a small Wisconsin city when General Motors stopped producing cars, overturning the residents’ lives.
* With the exception of Nadella’s Hit Refresh, books about management and leadership fared poorly this year, though Fast/Forward by Julian Birkinshaw and Jonas Ridderstrale, and Freek Vermeulen’s forthcoming Breaking Bad Habits, about what happens when best practice goes bad, came close.
* Economics for the Common Good, by French winner of the Nobel economics prize Jean Tirole, due out in October in English. It makes the case for economics as a positive force on the everyday existence of people and businesses.
* Stephen King’s Grave New World underlines that globalisation is under unprecedented threat.
* Kate Raworth, in Doughnut Economics, makes the case for a new economic model that pays more attention to human and environmental pressures.
* Walter Scheidel’s The Great Leveler, is a sobering history of inequality. Scheidel emphasizes the unavoidable importance of violent events — from plague to revolution — in redressing the economic balance. “All of us who prize greater economic equality would do well to remember that with the rarest of exceptions, it was only ever brought forth in sorrow,” he warns in his conclusion. “Be careful what you wish for.”
best_of  books  booklists  Edward_Thorp  FT  gambling  Las_Vegas  mathematics  Mihir_Desai  Satya_Nadella  Sheelah_Kolhatkar  Tom_Friedman 
august 2017 by jerryking
Diamonds in the Data Mine
May 2003 | HBR | By Gary Loveman.

Harrah's Entertainment has outplayed its competition and won impressive gains, despite being dealt a weak hand by the economy The secret? Mining the company's rich database to develop compelling customer incentives. in the Las Vegas Strip, and all of the neighbors are making spectacles of themselves. The $750 million Mirage boasts a Vesuvian volcano that erupts...
HBR  predictive_modeling  Las_Vegas  databases  gaming  CEOs  Harrah's  casinos  yield_management  data_mining  incentives 
january 2013 by jerryking
What's Selling Where: Burgers - WSJ.com
July 18, 2012 | WSJ | Ellen Byron
What's Selling Where

Convinced that flavor preferences are distinctly local, burger chain Smashburger, with 163 locations in three countries and 27 states, adds a local burger to each market's menu. Founder Tom Ryan, a food veteran of Quiznos, McDonald's MCD -1.27% and Pizza Hut, describes what goes into six different one-third pound Smashburgers, which sell for $5.99.
hamburgers  travel  Minneapolis  Tulsa  St._Louis  Michigan  Las_Vegas  San_Diego 
july 2012 by jerryking
From Harvard Yard To Vegas Strip Article
10.07.02 | Forbes.com - Magazine | Carol Potash.

Through branding, cross-casino marketing, loyalty cards, and technology, CEO Gary Loveman has made Harrah's Entertainment, the most diversified of the big four gaming companies, a model of effective customer feedback. In an industry accustomed to relying on intuition, Harrah's has built a database of 25 million customers that drills down through all its activities. Digital profiles are based not on observed behavior of what customers have spent but on analysis of what they are capable of spending. The technology includes built-in marketing interventions designed to close the gap between actual and potential spending. In this new world of computer-generated predictions, the customers are willing participants. Harrah's may be the best example of this kind of ongoing feedback system that could be applied to theme parks, ski resorts, cruise lines, retailers, and subscription businesses such as AOL and satellite TV.
predictive_modeling  Las_Vegas  databases  theme_parks  gaming  CEOs  Harrah's  casinos  yield_management  data_mining  customer_profiling  loyalty_management  customer_feedback  variance_analysis  leisure  branding  Gary_Loveman  marketing  observations 
july 2012 by jerryking
Hunting the Taliban in Las Vegas - Magazine - The Atlantic
September 2006
Print | Close
Hunting the Taliban in Las Vegas

In trailers just minutes away from the slot machines, Air Force pilots control Predators over Iraq and Afghanistan. A case study in the marvels—and limits—of modern military technology
By Robert D. Kaplan
drones  Las_Vegas  Robert_Kaplan  USAF  pilots 
october 2011 by jerryking
How a Las Vegas Megahotel Tries to Seem Smaller - WSJ.com
Sept. 22, 2011 | WSJ | By ANDREA PETERSEN. One key to
megahotels' survival: Increasingly, they are working to counter the
perception that they're crowded, filled with long lines and just too big
to give good service....In the vast parking lot of the nearly year-old
2,995-room Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, for example, electronic signs show
drivers how many spots are available within each level and row. Lights
above each space glow red if occupied, green if free. One Honolulu
giant, the 3,500-room Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Resort, recently
tackled front-desk lines by adding "roaming lobby concierges" to answer
questions and direct some guests to alternative reception desks.

MGM Grand employs strategies at every point, from the parking lot to
check-ins to housekeeping, to make its operations feel small.
Las_Vegas  hotels  customer_experience  digital_signage  personalization  parking  queuing  customer_intimacy  concierge  concierge_services 
september 2011 by jerryking

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