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The 60-second interview: Adi Ignatius, editor in chief, Harvard Business Review- POLITICO Media
By CAPITAL STAFF 04/28/2015

H.B.R. represented an amazing challenge. Here was a 90-year-old publication that had always done well but that needed reinvention. And so we reimagined everything—the magazine, the website, the book division. Our goal was to find ways to connect with new fans, while maintaining the same high standards. By any yardstick, it worked! Our circulation, at 300,000, is the highest it’s ever been, and our newsstand sales soared. Our readers are deeply engaged, and I interact with them all the time......CAPITAL: Harvard Business Review stories do particularly well in terms of social shares on LinkedIn. What do you make of LinkedIn's ambitions to become a media company, with in-house editors looking over user-generated articles? How those ambitions impact your publication?

IGNATIUS: Yes, H.B.R. content does well across the major social channels, including LinkedIn. We respect LinkedIn and have watched it evolve more and more into a content player. But we’re excited about what we’re doing at H.B.R. and fully expect to remain a valued destination for people in business who love ideas. We’re in the process of reinvention again, redefining what it means to be a subscriber, to be part of the H.B.R. experience. It’s exciting, and we look forward to unveiling it before too long.
HBR  social_media  reinvention  reimagining  magazines  newsstand_circulation  LinkedIn 
april 2018 by jerryking
The résumé is dead: your next click might determine your next job | Guardian Sustainable Business
16 February 2017 | | The Guardian| Tim Dunlop.

The traditional CV and interview are being abandoned as firms use new forms of data aggregation to find employees. This new field of recruitment, dubbed workforce science, is based on the idea that the data individuals create while doing things online can be harvested and interpreted and to provide a better idea of a person’s suitability than traditional methods.

Whereas in the past employers might have been impressed with the school you went to, practitioners of workforce science are encouraging them to prioritise other criteria. A New York Times article on the topic noted: “Today, every email, instant message, phone call, line of written code and mouse-click leaves a digital signal. These patterns can now be inexpensively collected and mined for insights into how people work and communicate, potentially opening doors to more efficiency and innovation within companies.”

Organisations including Knack and TalentBin are providing companies with information that, they claim, better matches people to jobs. Peter Kazanjy, the chief executive of TalentBin, explained to Business Insider Magazine: “Résumés are actually curious constructs now because, for the most part, work and our work product is fundamentally digital. Sometimes you don’t even need [résumés]. The reality of what somebody is and what they do … is already resident on their hard drive or their Evernote or their box.net account or their Dropbox cloud.”
digitalization  exhaust_data  job_search  Knack  LinkedIn  Managing_Your_Career  recruiting  résumés  TalentBin  workforce_science 
february 2017 by jerryking
LinkedIn Enters The Gig Economy With An Upwork Competitor
08.24.16 | | Fast Company | Business + Innovation | SARAH KESSLER.
LinkedIn  freelancing  gig_economy  Thumbtack  Upwork 
october 2016 by jerryking
Blitzscaling
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Blitzscaling
Tim Sullivan

FROM THE APRIL 2016 ISSUE

Let’s start with the basics. What is blitzscaling?
Hoffman: Blitzscaling is what you do when you need to grow really, really quickly. It’s the science and art of rapidly building out a company to serve a large and usually global market, with the goal of becoming the first mover at scale.

This is high-impact entrepreneurship. These kinds of companies always create a lot of the jobs and industries of the future. For example, Amazon essentially invented e-commerce. Today, it has over 150,000 employees and has created countless jobs at Amazon sellers and partners. Google revolutionized how we find information—it has over 60,000 employees and has created many more jobs at its AdWords and AdSense partners.

Why this focus on fast growth?
We’re in a networked age. And I don’t mean only the internet. Globalization is a form of network. It adds networks of transport, commerce, payment, and information flows around the world. In such an environment, you have to move faster, because competition from anywhere on the globe may beat you to scale.

Software has a natural affinity with blitzscaling, because the marginal costs of serving any size market are virtually zero. The more that software becomes integral to all industries, the faster things will move. Throw in AI machine learning, and the loops get even faster. So we’re going to see more blitzscaling. Not just a little more, but a lot more.
blitzscaling  economies_of_scale  scaling  HBR  high-growth  high-impact  Silicon_Valley  LinkedIn  Reid_Hoffman  networks  first_movers  large_markets  market_sizing  accelerated_lifecycles 
may 2016 by jerryking
6 Things I'd Do If I Got Laid-off By IBM
Jan 26, 2015 | LinkedIn | J.T. O'Donnell

4) Become 100% clear on your specialty. Employers hire the aspirin to their pain. While you might be a diversely skilled, jack-of-all-trades, you can't market yourself that way. Saying you can do everything sounds unfocused and desperate. You need to know what your special problem-solving, pain-relieving expertise is (i.e. your special sauce). Then, you need to market it accordingly.

5) Optimize your sales tools for your business-of-one. Your resume and LinkedIn profile must be set up to showcase your specialty quickly - and with as much impact as possible. Keyword optimization is vital. Knowing what recruiters are looking for when it comes to your skill set and showcasing it in the proper format will dramatically increase the amount of activity you get on your candidacy. [Here's an article to help you understand how little time your resume has to get a recruiter's attention.]

6) Create an interview bucket list. The fastest way to find job opportunities is to build a bucket list of companies you want to work for and network your way into the process. The majority of jobs gotten today are done so via referral. Creating a target list of employers and working a strategy to build relationships with them is the smartest way to land a job with a company you admire and respect. Especially, when you may be competing against lots of other ex-IBM employees for positions. [Here's a step-by-step plan on how to create your own bucket list of employers.]
IBM  layoffs  tips  LinkedIn  bouncing_back  Managing_Your_Career  job_search  painkillers  pain_points  JCK  specialists  special_sauce  résumés  personal_branding  referrals  unfocused 
january 2015 by jerryking
Recruiting has changed – and so should you - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 23 2015

how then, should job seekers manage their social media presence?

The two recommend a tasteful profile that clearly communicates a candidate’s history. A judiciously worded profile, they say, is more likely to get a stamp of approval from recruiters than one than one that goes overboard in listing professional feats and accomplishments.

Once a recruiter can check off the required skills and experience for a job description, that’s when questions of personality and relationship with the hiring organization come into play. It is this crucial attention to the soft skills that differentiates some executive search firms from those merely engaged in their own online search.
Leah_Eichler  recruiting  LinkedIn  executive_search  personal_branding  JCK  Managing_Your_Career 
january 2015 by jerryking
31 Fantastic Pieces Of Advice For Surviving Your First Year On Wall Street
FINANCE More: Wall Street Features Advice


25/32
Don't forget your manners when networking... even on LinkedIn.

“Networking is not calling someone when you need help. I never accept Li...
LinkedIn  networking  etiquette  Wall_Street  advice 
september 2014 by jerryking
Why I Do All My Recruiting Through LinkedIn - NYTimes.com
AUGUST 19, 2014 | NYT |By REBEKAH CAMPBELL.

How, in a sea of people, can I find my ideal candidate?

In the past, I would have posted job ads on all the appropriate websites and braced for a flood of applications....the problem was that the best candidates all had good positions and were not reading job advertisements. Somehow, I had to find these people and convince them to take a risk by joining our start-up. The only solution seemed to be to hire a recruiter and, as a cash-strapped small business, we just couldn’t afford to shell out a recruitment fee of 20 percent of the candidate’s annual salary....sign up to LinkedIn’s Recruiter service. For $2,200 per quarter, I can run detailed searches on exactly the type of candidates I’m looking for and then approach them en masse.
LinkedIn  recruiting  talent_management  talent  cash-strapped  howto  small_business  running_a_business 
august 2014 by jerryking
The Weekend Interview: Job Hunting in the Network Age - WSJ
By ANDY KESSLER
July 18, 2014 | WSJ |

Reid Hoffman has a theory on what makes ventures work: understanding that information is no longer isolated but instantly connected to everything else. Call it the move from the information age to the network age. Mr. Hoffman thinks that the transformation is just getting started and will take out anyone who stands in the way.

But what is a network? It's an identity, he explains, and how that identity interacts with others through communications and transactions. It's not just online, on Facebook and Twitter, but everywhere. It is the sum of those communications, conversations and interactions.

"Your identity is now constituted by the network," he says. "You are your friends, you are your tribe, you are your interactions with your colleagues, your customers, even your competitors. All those things come to form what your reputation is." In short, you are no longer the only one in control of your résumé...Mr. Hoffman had his own idea for a personal information managers (PIM) concept, but raising money proved tough. He got his first taste of venture capitalists in 1994 when he tried to find funding: "You probably should go learn how to launch software," potential investors told him.

So Mr. Hoffman joined Apple......Mr. Hoffman thinks that corporations still haven't figured out how to use LinkedIn and other platforms to their advantage. "All companies are being affected by globalization. All companies are being affected by technology disruption. Which means the innovation and adaptation cycles are getting shorter and shorter." How do you make your company more adaptive? "The answer is you need adaptive people working for you. It's much better for the company and much better for the employees—it accomplishes a network effect,"

Finding these adaptive employees is one thing, keeping them is another. LinkedIn forces companies to work at that.
accelerated_lifecycles  adaptability  Andy_Kessler  Communicating_&_Connecting  informational_advantages  innovation_cycles  job_search  learning_agility  LinkedIn  networks  networking  network_effects  network_power  Reid_Hoffman  reputation  résumés  retention  Silicon_Valley  tribes 
july 2014 by jerryking
How I Hire: The Case Study Interview
September 24, 2013 | LinkedIn | by Kevin ChouInfluencer, CEO, co-founder at Kabam
case_studies  interviews  LinkedIn  hiring 
april 2014 by jerryking
What Thomas L. Friedman Didn’t Report About Getting Hired by Google | LinkedIn
Gary BurnisonInfluencer
Chief Executive Officer at Korn/Ferry International
What Thomas L. Friedman Didn’t Report About Getting Hired by Google
March 13, 2014

learning agility is the leading predictor of success – No. 1 above intelligence and education.

While Friedman reported on one company, I am writing to tell you that learning agility will get you a job anywhere – from Walmart to Twitter, to Google, to Facebook, to GM, to Tata, to L’Oreal and more.

And, in today’s workplace, jobs and job responsibilities change quickly. So, the key to retaining a job and growing in your career is learning agility.

The Peter Principle, which asserts that employees will continue to get promoted until they reach their highest level of incompetence, has evolved. Today employees don’t need to get promoted to become incompetent. They will become incompetent in their current jobs if they don’t grow, adapt, and evolve.

If you stop growing and learning, your job will outgrow you. If you grow and learn faster than your job, employers will always want you.

The other thing that Friedman did not tell you is that the “learning agile” uncover new challenges, solicit direct feedback, self-reflect, and find ways to get jobs done resourcefully. They see unique patterns and make fresh connections that others overlook.

A Korn Ferry study of sales managers bears this out: The higher an individual’s learning agility, the more promotions he or she received during a 10-year period. Similarly, longitudinal studies observed that managers who modified their behaviors, exhibited flexibility, and accepted mistakes as part of learning new competencies, were more successful than their counterparts as they climbed the corporate ladder.

There are five factors to Learning Agility: mental agility, self-awareness, people agility, change agility, and results agility.

The net-net is that most successful executives are able to move out of their comfort zone, take risks, learn from mistakes, and begin anew as they encounter new assignments. The successful leaders continually learn, bend, and flex as their work world changed.
LinkedIn  Korn_Ferry  Google  Tom_Friedman  hiring  character_traits  learning  learning_curves  learning_journeys  learning_agility  mental_dexterity  self-awareness 
march 2014 by jerryking
Executive search firm rebuilds after staff defections - The Globe and Mail
RICHARD BLACKWELL

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jan. 09 2014

The shift to specialization in the executive-search business has partly been spurred by social media, Mr. Lovas said. Using sites such as LinkedIn, it is easy for anyone to come up with a list of chief financial officers, for example, but only a recruiter with a specialization in CFOs will have the knowledge and relationships necessary to determine who is truly qualified for a position and get them to consider a job change.

Another major shift in the head-hunting business, he said, is the increasing need to find interim managers to run a client company until a permanent employee can be found.

Indeed, the “interim management” business could be a bigger business than the basic executive search business within a decade, Mr. Lovas said. “It is one of the great trends in recruiting going forward.”
executive_search  professional_service_firms  relationships  LinkedIn  CFOs  interim  executive_management  defections 
january 2014 by jerryking
The Path to Happy Employment, Contact by Contact on LinkedIn - NYTimes.com
By ERIC A. TAUB
Published: December 4, 2013

LinkedIn, the networking site for professionals, has become a vast business gathering place. With more than 259 million members in over 200 countries, LinkedIn offers users, most of whom pay nothing for the service, a chance to hone and increase their contacts. Users can also limit their connections to others who can best help them professionally....First, the basics: LinkedIn allows users to create a compelling text-and-multimedia narrative of their life and work. It can be updated at will, can be any length and it will often pop up in a Web search of the user’s name. Add multimedia, such as slide presentations and links to examples of your work.

Use the headline space (right under your name) to create a compelling statement about yourself. Instead of “third assistant stock clerk,” be creative. “Inventory manager with over 20 years’ experience” will generate more views. ....As Ted Prodromou, a San Francisco consultant and author of a book on how to use LinkedIn, says, “What would you type in, to find you?.....To avoid embarrassing congratulatory emails for something you haven’t done, turn off those notification settings before you post your profile .... To avoid embarrassing congratulatory emails for something you haven’t done, turn off those notification settings before you post your profile. To do so, hover your cursor over your picture in the upper right. Then click “Review,” next to “Privacy and Settings.”

On the “Profile” tab, you can turn off these “activity broadcasts” or decide who should see them if you want to leave them on. This is also where you can choose to let others know you have viewed their profile (or prefer to be anonymous), determine how much of your profile strangers can see, automatically send profile updates to your Twitter account and other options.
LinkedIn  productivity  howto  JCK  job_opportunities  job_search 
december 2013 by jerryking
Networking to grow your business
1. Build your ideal network
Identify who can provide introductions to the people you want to meet, whether it’s potential clients, investors or employees. Meeting people in professional settings, such as conferences or trade shows, or even getting to know the suppliers, clients or competitors of your target clients will help you build your ideal network. Don’t be afraid to ask for introductions.

2. Create a networking strategy
Develop an action plan to connect with each person on your list. Leverage existing networks, acquaintances and events. Social media tools, such es LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter, are also powerful marketing tools that all; ggoeliont way to tap into broad social circles and establish a strong network.

3. Nurture and deepen your relationships
Prioritize the relationships that are most important for your business goals and manage your relationships to get the most benefit. Follow up and solidify your relationships by - 1 W * “J staying in touch on a regular basis over an extended period of time. A smaller network of high value contacts may serve you better than a larger network. Ensure that you are getting value by tracking your activities and the results they produce.

For more information, visit cibc.com/smallbusinessgrowth.
networking  howto  social_media  relationships  LinkedIn  conferences  action_plans  following_up 
december 2013 by jerryking
Users Sue LinkedIn Over Harvesting of E-Mail Addresses - NYTimes.com
September 21, 2013, 6:05 pm 114 Comments
Users Sue LinkedIn Over Harvesting of E-Mail Addresses
By VINDU GOEL
spamming  LinkedIn  e-mail  illegal_harvesting 
september 2013 by jerryking
Eight Reasons High School Students Should Be On LinkedIn - Forbes
Susan Adams, Forbes Staff

I cover careers, jobs and every aspect of leadership.
Follow (1,917)
Leadership
|
5/14/2013
high_schools  students  LinkedIn 
july 2013 by jerryking
Should I Accept that LinkedIn Invitation? - Alexandra Samuel -
June 25, 2013 | Harvard Business Review | by Alexandra Samuel.

the answer to the who-should-I-connect-to-on-LinkedIn question is to use a "favor test." The favor test is simple: Would you do a favor for this person, or ask a favor of them? If so, make the connection. If not, take a pass. VERSUS

an attitude that "It's not about a rule. It's much more about your feeling and beeing. I can accept that Ln invitation just because of a relevant profile; just because of chasing curiosity at moment of reading; just because of why not, he/she has low connections; just because he/she could open gates never expected; just because this is life: sliding doors."
etiquette  LinkedIn  HBR  social_networking  networking 
june 2013 by jerryking
The headhunter’s role in the digital age - The Globe and Mail
RENEE SYLVESTRE-WILLIAMS

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jun. 13 2013

headhunters can find and assess candidates to find the perfect person for a particular job. This saves companies a lot of time, she adds, making it worth their while to pay for a headhunter’s services.

“We identify the talent pool for that specific [job] requirement,” Ms. Pastor explains. “We want to find people who don’t contact us. LinkedIn is one tool and there is a small per cent of talented people there because not everyone is on it.”
executive_search  headhunters  LinkedIn  talent  human_resources  leadership  human_capital  talent_management  talent_pools 
june 2013 by jerryking
Amazing Career Advice For College Grads From LinkedIn's Billionaire Founder - Business Insider
1. Competition.
What should I do with my Life? is the WRONG question--it's too self-absorbed. Instead, make it about everyone else, which means isolating your competitive advantage (assets, aspirations, market realities). In terms of making a positive difference in the world, ask "how can I help?"
2. Networks
Proactively build your network.Relationships matter as people control access to resources, opportunities and information. It's likely that someone I already know knows someone who could help me.
3. Risk
Actions, not plans generate useful lessons. Playing it safe is one of the riskiest things you can do--learn to take Intelligent Risks. Prioritize plans that offer the best chance at learning about yourself and the world. If the worst case scenario is losing a bit of time or money or experiencing some discomfort, this is a worthwhile risk. if the worst case scenario is the serious tarnishing of one's reputation, loss of all economic assets, or something otherwise career ending, don't accept that risk. The best opportunities can be the one with the most question marks.
advice  Managing_Your_Career  Reid_Hoffman  LinkedIn  career_ending_moves  entrepreneurship  indispensable  serving_others  Colleges_&_Universities  students  new_graduates  job_search  discomforts  action-oriented  self-absorbed  playing_it_safe 
may 2013 by jerryking
Tips from the pros on how to advance your career
Dec. 28 2012 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER.

To advance your career, here are some other pointers:

(1) Surround yourself with smart people

As you move up in an organization, your responsibility increases, and it becomes tougher to do everything on your own.

“Many people feel defeated when they can no longer succeed through their own efforts. Rather than seeing it as a sign of personal weakness, surround yourself with smart people who have different perspectives and different skills,” she says. “Listen to them respectfully and attentively, draw out their ideas, and work to integrate their perspectives into your plans and solutions to problems.”

(2) Be your own CEO.

“Leadership isn’t about a title. Real leadership is about getting big things done in the face of challenges, being part of the solution versus the problem, and inspiring everyone around you – even if you’re the janitor,” he says.

(3) Know yourself

The foundation of success is self-awareness – of your strengths, interests, personality factors and the desires that form the basis of good career choices throughout life...spend time reflecting on one's internal processes.” Routinely ask yourself: Does what I am doing really play into what I’m best at or really want to do – or am I being sidetracked by the appeal of the money or the status of the promotion?

(4) Develop – and use – your contact list

If handed a business card, make sure you put it in your e-mail contacts and send a ‘glad to meet you’ note.” Then keep in touch, perhaps quarterly or twice a year for the “hot contacts” who might help you down the road to advance your career.

(5) Write an anti-résumé

Your résumé probably looks backward at your career. Instead write a forward-looking statement of your strengths, desires and influences, and what possibilities intrigue you for the future. It should be about a half-page, perhaps in bullet-point format. “update it regularly. It helps you to catch clues about the future rather than look through the rear-view mirror as a résumé does,”.

(6) Embrace the digital you (one-page branding site or an authentically powerful LinkedIn profile).
(7) Focus on the fix. (present solutions, not problems. See what might be accomplished, or suggest a solution to a problem or a means of overcoming a barrier.
(8) Rise above being average. Strive to be at the "Picasso-level".
(9) Get involved in volunteering.
(10) Polish your credentials.
LinkedIn  Managing_Your_Career  Roger_Martin  Rotman  Harvey_Schachter  tips  movingonup  self-awareness  networking  problem_solving  leadership  overachievers  personal_branding  CEOs  strengths  forward_looking  résumés  Pablo_Picasso  anti-résumé  volunteering  smart_people  backward_looking  one-page  high-achieving 
december 2012 by jerryking
Jeff Weiner of LinkedIn, on the ‘Next Play’ Philosophy - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
Published: November 10, 2012

Prioritization sounds like such a simple thing, but true prioritization starts with a very difficult question to answer, especially at a company with a portfolio approach: If you could only do one thing, what would it be? And you can’t rationalize the answer, and you can’t attach the one thing to some other things. It’s just the one thing. And I was struck by the clarity and the courage of his conviction. He felt it so deeply, and there wasn’t a person in the audience that day who did not take that with them as a lasting memory.

Q. Are there certain expressions that you find yourself repeating at work?

A. Sure. The first one has essentially become the unofficial mantra of LinkedIn, and it’s not something I came up with. It’s something I read and loved and decided to use. And it’s two words: “next play.”

The person I borrowed it from is Coach K [Mike Krzyzewski] of the Duke Blue Devils. Every time the basketball team goes up and down the court and they complete a sequence, offense or defense, Coach K yells out the exact same thing, every time. He yells out “next play,” because he doesn’t want the team lingering too long on what just took place. He doesn’t want them celebrating that incredible alley-oop dunk, and he doesn’t want them lamenting the fact that the opposing team just stole the ball and had a fast break that led to an easy layup. You can take a moment to reflect on what just happened, and you probably should, but you shouldn’t linger too long on it, and then move on to the next play.
LinkedIn  leadership  CEOs  portfolios  priorities  basketball  defensive_tactics  offensive_tactics  next_play 
november 2012 by jerryking
Sites Like Groupon and Facebook Disappoint Investors - NYTimes.com
By JAMES B. STEWART
Published: August 17, 2012

Every company has its own story, but the euphoria over social media companies as a group was rooted in what economists call the network effect. The more users a site attracts, the more others will want to use it, which creates a natural monopoly and a magnet for advertisers.

Facebook has been a classic example. If your friends, colleagues or classmates are all on it, you’re all but compelled to join. But evidence that the network effect is working requires rapid growth in users and revenue, especially during the early stages of a company’s public life. So far, social media has failed to deliver the kind of growth that would bolster investor optimism, let alone euphoria.

The network effect is a double-edged sword, Ken Sena, a consumer Internet analyst at Evercore, told me this week.

“The network effect allowed these companies to grow so fast, but the decline can be just as ferocious,” Mr. Sena said. “If any of them misstep with users, they can leave, and the network effect goes into reverse.” The textbook case is Myspace, once the most visited social networking site, that is now a shadow of its former self.
networks  network_effects  Facebook  Groupon  LinkedIn  Larry_Summers  decline  missteps 
august 2012 by jerryking
Tips for asking better questions
Converse, don't interrogate - distinguishes how to exchange with a mentor vs a peer. Offer my own thoughts as away of encouraging a real conversation. Give intelligence to others as this will nudge them to reciprocate.
Adjust the lens - when trying to make a decision, ask wide questions to identify the criteria to be used (5 W's), ask narrow questions to identify the weight to be assigned to each. Narrow questions invites specific, often factual answers about the specific area of inquiry--and nothing else.
Frame and prime - construct the question in multiple ways for high quality intelligence
Follow up and probe - to gain better intelligence beyond a single question
Reid_Hoffman  tips  LinkedIn  Communicating_&_Connecting  questions  conversations  follow-up_questions  adjustments  generosity  wide-framing  narrow-framing  5_W’s 
march 2012 by jerryking
Connections with Integrity
February 13, 2012 |Strategy + BUsiness | by Reid Hoffman.

The venture capitalist who co-founded LinkedIn reveals the surefire system that he has used since high school for evaluating potential business relationships.....It seems counterintuitive, but the more altruistic your attitude, the more benefits you will gain from the relationship. If you insist on a quid pro quo every time you help others, you will have a much narrower network and a more limited set of opportunities. Conversely, if you set out to help others by introducing them to the right people, simply because you think it’s the right thing to do, you will rapidly reinforce your own reputation and expand your universe of possibilities. For me, that is the greatest value of understanding alliances; it can help you build the kind of network on which great careers are built.
networking  LinkedIn  Reid_Hoffman  social_networking  social_capital  serving_others  counterintuitive  transactional_relationships  integrity  quid_pro_quo  alliance  the_right_people  personal_connections 
march 2012 by jerryking
Reid Hoffman of LinkedIn Has Become the Go-To Guy of Tech - NYTimes.com
November 5, 2011 | NYT | By EVELYN M. RUSLI.

Hearing Mr. Hoffman wax philosophical about technology, it’s easy to understand why so many here seem to view him as something of a yoda. When he talks about “scale” — Internet-speak for having enough people use a network to make the network actually useful — he often invokes Archimedes, the great mathematician and inventor in ancient Greece.

According to lore, Archimedes created a device with a revolving screw-shaped blade to pump water against gravity: the Archimedes screw. Mr. Hoffman urges his followers to find their own levers and devices to encourage people to adopt their technologies. Entrepreneurs, he says, often spend too much time creating products and too little figuring out how to get people to use them....“When you write a scholarly work, it tends to be understood by very few people, and has one publication point over time,” he said. “But when you build a service, you can touch millions, to hundreds of millions of people directly.”...Today, LinkedIn, the professional social network, is a rising giant, a monument to the emergence of the social Web. Founded in 2002, the company has ballooned to more than 1,700 employees. It has more than 135 million registered members across 200 countries. It has turned a profit in six of the last seven quarters. ...In the same way that social media redefined the Internet, he sees another tectonic shift on the horizon.

This one, he believes, will be driven by data. Mr. Hoffman has been investing in companies that are data-driven or starting to work with data in interesting ways. For instance, even though two Greylock investments, Shopkick and Groupon, focus on retailing, both aggregate a huge volume of information on user spending habits. LinkedIn, too, has been trying to leverage the data on its site by, for example, making it more searchable.
Reid_Hoffman  LinkedIn  profile  entrepreneur  Silicon_Valley  data_driven  analytics  data  massive_data_sets  Greylock  scaling  searchable  network_effects  habits  spending  customer_adoption  seismic_shifts  Archimedes  Greek 
november 2011 by jerryking
End of the Cold Call? - WSJ.com
MAY 8, 2006 |WSJ | By JEANETTE BORZO

Small firms turn to innovative technology to make their search for clients a lot more effective.
cold_calling  small_business  LinkedIn  sales  tools  Jigsaw  Spoke  iProfile  digital_signage 
october 2011 by jerryking
Low-key founder of LinkedIn hits IPO jackpot - The Globe and Mail
omar el akkad AND paul waldie
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 19, 2011
Omar_El_Akkad  Paul_Waldie  Reid_Hoffman  profile  LinkedIn  low-key 
september 2011 by jerryking
A brave new networked world - FT.com
July 18, 2011 | FT | by Philip Delves Broughton.

Technology may have made everyone accessible, but it has not yet made
all social networks equal.... Old fashioned ties (telephone or in-person
meetings) continue to be of paramount importance...don't underestimate
the importance of re-activating dormant ties....businesses use social
network analysis tools to categorize customers....
Social network analysis is being used to measure job performance and
forecast turnover, to rate employees for promotion, monitor their
ethical standards and improve the systems for collaboration. It is now a
standard diagnostic and prescriptive tool for management consultants
advising companies.
social_networking  LinkedIn  Philip_Delves_Broughton 
july 2011 by jerryking
The Start-Up of You - NYTimes.com
July 12, 2011 | NYT | Tom Friedman. Reid Hoffman, has a book
coming out in 2012 called “The Start-Up of You,” co-authored with Ben
Casnocha. Its subtitle could easily be: “Hey, recent graduates! Hey,
35-year-old midcareer professional! Here’s how you build your career
today.” ....Hoffman argues that professionals need an entirely new
mind-set & skill set to compete. “The old paradigm of climb up a
stable career ladder is dead & gone,” “No career is a sure thing
anymore. The uncertain, rapidly changing conditions in which
entrepreneurs start companies is what it’s like for fashioning a career.
Therefore, approach career strategy the same way an entrepreneur
approaches starting a business.” Ditch the grand life plan.
Entrepreneurs don’t write a 100-pg. biz plan and execute it one time; be
emergent....use your netwk. to pull in info. & intelligence about
where the growth opportunities are [this would be knowledge or market intelligence] — & invest in yourself to build [transferrable] skills that will allow you to profit from those opportunities.
books  career  career_paths  Managing_Your_Career  start_ups  entrepreneurship  pattern_recognition  opportunistic  Tom_Friedman  LinkedIn  Reid_Hoffman  new_graduates  individual_initiative  rapid_change  emergent  market_intelligence  transferable_skills 
july 2011 by jerryking
I’m Tired of People Wanting to Network With Me
May 4, 2011 | BNET | By Suzanne Lucas. We are all familiar
with the fact that most of us will, at some future date, need (or want) a
new job. But, what about when you need to buy new software? You mean
it’s not just the salesperson you’re supposed to rely on? What about
their carefully screened testimonials?

Yeah, right. What you want is someone who has actually worked with the
software to tell you how it really works. Someone who isn’t on the
payroll of the company. That’s where your network comes in.

This also helps for any product you want to buy, or any major problem
you want to solve. People will often jump at the chance to help someone
else out, not just because most people are good people, but because
they see it as an opportunity to build a relationship with someone else
who might be able to answer their question one day.
LinkedIn  networking  howto  relationships 
may 2011 by jerryking
Legal Rebels - 5 Business Model Innovations Solos Need to Truly Compete with BigLaw
With the financial crisis of 2008-2009, every part of this old model has come under scrutiny, even in a traditionally high-end field like IP litigation. Specifically:

Leverage. Leverage, or the associate-to-partner ratio within a firm or practice, is good for reportable profits per partner. But it is not necessarily good for clients. As clients push to cut litigation costs, leverage declines. This trend favors solos and less-leveraged practices.

Within One Firm. Historically, the transaction costs associated with assembling a team of lawyers not located under the same roof made it prohibitive to build a competitive litigation team from a network of solos. But the rise of Web 2.0 is changing that. With my LinkedIn/Facebook/Outlook network of colleagues, I can identify, customize and assemble a team in less time than it used to take to walk the halls of my old BigLaw firm. But we need innovation in the areas of contractual arrangements and the laws governing lawyers to fully deliver on the promise of the ad hoc, Web 2.0, virtual law firm.

Customized. In most areas of law practice, as the field matures, more and more aspects of the discipline become standardized.

Off the shelf. The opposite of build-it-by-hand-from-scratch-every-time. Compared with some other fields of law, IP litigation has been fairly slow to progress in this manner. It has therefore remained—relatively speaking—profitable custom work. But we are starting to see some indications that aspects of IP litigation are being made more routine, even standardized. This is a good development for the solo IP litigator. As formerly labor-intensive-but-routine pieces of IP litigation evolve into off-the-shelf modules, we are freed up to apply our creativity and good judgment to the more strategic aspects of the case, with a diminished need to spend time supervising large teams as they custom-polish a third set of interrogatories or research for the nth time how to apply the Brown Bag Software case to a two-tiered stipulated protective order. Innovation in off-the-shelf litigation modules is starting to arrive, and more is needed.

Billable hours. It has been proclaimed and repeated that the billable hour is dead. Well, maybe not quite. But it is certainly open to competition from alternative fee arrangements. We have enough data and experience now that we can start to accurately predict IP litigation costs. And we can bill a la carte, charging fixed fees for different pieces of litigation. A menu might include one fixed fee for pleading-through-pretrial conference, a per-deposition fee, a per-custodian document discovery fee and so on. Models continue to evolve. Clients want their lawyers to share the risk—to have some “skin in the game”—and to have incentives for efficiency. Innovative billing models are coming.
solo  business_models  law_firms  competitive_landscape  Big_Law  off_the_shelf  billable_hours  transaction_costs  LinkedIn  Facebook  networks  JCK  Michael_McDerment  leverage 
october 2010 by jerryking
PricewaterhouseCoopers Pays for Priority on LinkedIn - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 4, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JOE WALKER. New
Recruiting Tool for College Students Gives Accounting Firm Top Billing
PwC  LinkedIn  Colleges_&_Universities 
october 2010 by jerryking
The tricks to recruiting top talent
Oct. 04, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | VIRGINIA GALT. Top
desires of a job seeker. Money: “Most of us who deal with this have a
rule of thumb that you have to give at least a 10% increase to move
anybody,” says Toronto lawyer Stewart Saxe. An equity stake: “The real
upside is in the equity participation if you are at a senior enough
level,” said recruiter Tom Long. “What they are looking for is the
opportunity to participate … and have a home run.” Work-life balance:
“Three weeks of vacation is now pretty standard. In addition, some shops
close between Christmas and New Years, and a lot of firms are also
giving five personal days as floaters,” said Katie Dolgin .
“Flexibility, being able to work from home occasionally if they have a
sick child, is important.” A safety net: This is particularly important
for executives who leave big jobs for smaller, younger enterprises,
recruiters say. Many candidates will insist on severance clauses to
protect themselves if things go south.
talent  recruiting  Virginia_Galt  Google  LinkedIn  Pablo_Picasso  ksfs  small_business  executive_management  executive_search  safety_nets  inducements  work_life_balance  equity  flexibility 
october 2010 by jerryking
LinkedIn Etiquette: The Right Way to Request New Connections
June 3, 2010 | CIO | By Kristin Burnham. 1. Do Your Homework,
Browse their profile to understand who they are. Where are they working?
Previous jobs? LinkedIn groups they belong to? Their interests? Do they
blog? 2. Find Common Ground. Find at least 2 or 3 things in common e.g.
an alma mater, LinkedIn group, other connections. 3. Craft A Personal
Note. Instead of the impersonal, standard msg. combine the info. above
to generate a memorable introduction before telling them why you want to
connect. E.g: Hi Megan, I noticed that we were both in the (fill in the
blank) group on Linked In, that Jeff Smith and John Rodgers were mutual
friends and that we grew up in the same city. I've heard great things
about (fill in the blank) and thought it would be great to reach out and
connect to learn more about it from you. Would you be open to a quick
call this Tues. at noon or Thurs. at 3pm to discuss it? Let me know if
e-mail works best for you instead, and I look forward to hearing from
you.
LinkedIn  etiquette  tips  networking  impersonal 
july 2010 by jerryking
Joined-up Thinking -
April 7th, 2007 | The Economist | Economist Staff.
Social-networking sites are not just for teenagers. They have business
uses too.
LinkedIn  social_networking 
may 2009 by jerryking
The Care and Feeding of Network Contacts - WSJ.com
MAY 14, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by JENNIFER SARANOW

Online networking isn't something you do only when looking for a job. "Your network is most valuable when you don't need it,".
LinkedIn  social_networking  best_practices  etiquette 
may 2009 by jerryking
Basics - An Online Toolbox Starts With a Polished Résumé - NYTimes.com
April 1, 2009 | New York Times | By JOSHUA CONDON

THINK BEYOND THE RéSUMé. With a little creativity, people in almost any
profession can make online applications or a personal Web site work for
them
résumés  LinkedIn  personal_branding 
april 2009 by jerryking

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