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jerryking : live_nation   12

Ticketmaster’s New Challenger: Your Face - WSJ
By Anne Steele
Updated May 4, 2018

The industry is ripe for disruption. People are spending more than ever on experiences, even as concern is rising about security at crowded live events. At the same time, artists and teams today have little control over how, to whom or for how much their tickets are sold.
entrepreneur  start_ups  disruption  Live_Nation  live_performances  facial-recognition  sports  arenas  Ticketmaster  Rival  Andreessen_Horowitz 
may 2018 by jerryking
Twilight of the Rock Gods -
March 25, 2017 | WSJ | By Neil Shah.

As rock ‘n’ roll loses its founding megastars—and sales juggernauts—the music industry faces pressure to revamp.....As rock's founding fathers and mothers get older, the music industry faces a problem: can younger artists replace their sales?

Of the 25 artists with the highest record sales in the U.S. since 1991, when reliable data first became available, just one—Britney Spears—is under 40, Nielsen data show. Nineteen of the 25 are over 50 years old.....In terms of concert-tour revenue, artists over 50 represent half of the $4.5 billion generated by last year’s top 100-grossing tours, excluding non-music acts and comedians, according to a WSJ analysis of data from Pollstar, the trade magazine. Of the top 10, five were over 50, including Bruce Springsteen (67), Guns N’ Roses (average age 53), Paul McCartney (74), Garth Brooks (55) and the Rolling Stones (73), Pollstar data show.......the number of celebrity deaths last year wasn’t exceptional, according to a study by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, though the number of “mega famous” celebrity deaths was. Because of their penchant for hard living, rocker deaths are likely to stay consistently high. .....Rock has an outsize influence on music sales. It was responsible for 41% of total U.S. album sales last year, far higher than hip-hop and R&B (15%), country (13%) or pop (10%), according to Nielsen......Much of rock’s commercial success was possible because of the way the industry was structured. By the 1980s, cash-rich major labels were helping finance tours, throwing money at fledgling acts and investing huge sums in veteran stars even when their careers floundered.

Such investments—equivalent in spirit to the R&D expenditures of pharmaceutical firms—helped artists build enduring brands and transformed superstars into major corporations that overshadow young pop/rock acts even today.......WILL YOUNGER STARS FILL THE VOID?

Probably not. Because of the multiplicity of entertainment options today, reduced attention spans, personalized tastes and less record-label support, most of today’s artists will never be as big as yesterday’s rockers.

Radio used to have the power to make even a lower-quality rock release popular. However, the fragmentation of the music industry—fans using multiple formats and splintering across rock, hip-hop, country and electronic music—means most acts will never find the same big audiences......WHAT ABOUT CONCERTS?

Young megastars like Beyoncé, Taylor Swift and country acts like Carrie Underwood make most of their money on tour. And there will be a successive generation of touring veterans like Lady Gaga, Justin Timberlake and Nicki Minaj, along with unexpected reunions and area headliners.

But many acts today from rapper Future to rockers Japandroids don’t generate colossal sums compared with older stars.......WHAT HAPPENS NOW?

The concert business is going in two directions: diversifying into festivals and smaller venues, to focus on younger audiences, while continuing to squeeze every opportunity out of the boomer market.

Joe Edwards, a St. Louis music-venue owner, sees the industry shifting focus from big venues such as amphitheaters to the smaller 1,000 to 3,000-seat venues suited to today’s artists. “I see more acts loving those sizes,” he says, since the artists don’t have to wait to play bigger stages. “Smaller venues will be very popular,” he says.

To reach younger audiences, Live Nation, the country’s biggest concert promoter, has been on a music-festival-buying spree. Last spring, the company bought a majority stake in Founders Entertainment, which runs New York’s Governors Ball festival, part of a strategy that diversifies its business away from the 40-plus amphitheaters it runs.
aging  artists  attention_spans  celebrities  concerts  deaths  golden_oldies  legacy_artists  Live_Nation  live_performances  music  music_industry  music_festivals  music_venues  rock-'n'-roll  small_formats  small_spaces  superstars  touring 
march 2017 by jerryking
With New Move, Jay-Z Enters a Sports Agent State of Mind - NYTimes.com
By KEN BELSON
Published: April 2, 2013

Roc Nation Sports is the newest arm of Roc Nation, Jay-Z’s “full-service entertainment company” that has quickly built a strong reputation representing artists like Rihanna, Shakira and M.I.A. Jay-Z has been temporarily licensed to represent professional baseball players, said Ron Berkowitz, a spokesman for Roc Nation Sports, which also has teamed with Creative Artists Agency, a leading Hollywood agency that provides formidable negotiating authority.
Jay-Z  sports  talent_management  Live_Nation  baseball  talent_representation 
april 2013 by jerryking
Meet the most powerful man in music -
Mar. 18 2013 | The Globe and Mail | KATE TAYLOR
music_industry  Live_Nation 
march 2013 by jerryking
Electronic Dance Genre Tempts Investors - NYTimes.com
By BEN SISARIO
Published: April 4, 2012

The concert industry’s new favorite genre is electronic dance music....Having developed on the margins, electronic dance music — high-energy waves of mechanized sound that, at its best, creates a communal experience for a sea of strangers — is dominated by a network of independent promoters.

They include Insomniac, which presents Electric Daisy Carnival; Hard Events, another nationwide promoter; Ultra, whose namesake festival in Miami has expanded to Brazil, Argentina and Poland; and Made Event, behind the Electric Zoo festival in New York.

Their success has attracted a clutch of potential investors from inside and outside the music world. The insiders include Live Nation and A.E.G. Live, the two biggest corporate promoters.

The outsiders include Ron Burkle, the supermarket magnate who made an unsuccessful bid last year for the Warner Music Group, and the media mogul Robert F. X. Sillerman, according to people involved in investment talks who declined to be identified discussing private agreements....a marriage between D.J.’s and billionaire investors may be difficult. Live music is a risky and low-margin business for promoters. Pricing tickets too high or too low, for example, can sink an otherwise successful venture. Dance music also faces the perennial fad question: will its popularity stick this time or blow over as it did in the 1990s, when it was called electronica?
music  music_industry  investors  Live_Nation  EDM  live_music  high-risk  low-margin  music_festivals 
april 2012 by jerryking
Big Data is watching you
Jan. 06, 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Simon Houpt.

Companies have amassed trillions of digital bread crumbs: from credit card transactions, from people’s online wanderings on social media and search sites, from GPS devices embedded within smart phones...

Live Nation acquired Big Champagne, a consumer data analytics firm that had gained notice for developing the Ultimate Chart, a ranking of the most popular songs and artists according to chatter on social networks and other online sites.

Big Champagne will help Live Nation crunch the information it has on the 200 million ticket buyers in its database, and also help design the company’s dynamic pricing model...An ever more connected world offers richer opportunities for marketers to collect specific consumer data.

The Christmas season may still be a recent memory, but many marketers are already casting a hopeful eye upon 2012 as the year they finally turn into mercantile versions of Santa Claus: omniscient beings who know everything about their customers, and not just whether they’ve been bad or good. (And yes, the marketers believe they’re doing it for goodness’ sake.)

In the past few years, companies have amassed trillions of digital bread crumbs: from credit card transactions, from people’s online wanderings on social media and search sites, from GPS devices embedded within smart phones. Last June, the market intelligence firm IDC said the amount of data produced by our ever-digitizing mass of humanity is more than doubling every two years. Companies are drowning in data. But they’re also recognizing an extraordinary opportunity, and after a series of studies of so-called big data published by research firms over the past year, many are predicting it will become a major focus of marketing executives in 2012.

Already this year, Big Data has received a big endorsement. On Wednesday, after being appointed president of Yahoo, the ex-PayPal executive Scott Thompson was pledging that data would be the key to his new company’s future just as it powered his last company.

“I am certain that the battle of the next generation of Internet businesses will be made up of who has more data and who knows how to use it better than anyone else,” he told a reporter for the trade publication AdAge.com. “I’m not talking about your classic segmentation stuff,” he said, referring to the demographic categorization that companies use to group individuals into broad target markets. Companies such as Yahoo will increasingly focus on individuals. “It’s the segmentation of one and what the data of one tells you,” he said.

In the middle of December, the live entertainment colossus Live Nation acquired Big Champagne, a consumer data analytics firm that had gained notice for developing the Ultimate Chart, a ranking of the most popular songs and artists according to chatter on social networks and other online sites.

Big Champagne will help Live Nation crunch the information it has on the 200 million ticket buyers in its database, and also help design the company’s dynamic pricing model: the practice of altering ticket prices depending on real-time supply and demand. Old industries are also getting into that act. Over the past year, Broadway producers have capitalized on dynamic pricing to charge much higher ticket prices for especially hot shows, and nimbly offer discounts when demand fell away.

Even very young industries are being remodelled by the use of more specific data. Last year, after trying to slug it out with Groupon and Living Social, the two-year-old San Francisco-based local offers provider Bloomspot took a different tack. The company realized it could confront the main reason for merchants’ disenchantment with the sites – a belief that too many people merely take advantage of discounts and never patronize the merchants again – by sifting data in order to find the most valuable customers.

With the permission of both the participating merchants and the customers, “we are able to effectively get access to the stream of consumer credit card purchases belonging to a particular merchant by going through the credit card processors,” said Jasper Malcolmson, the Canadian-born president of Bloomspot, which received $40-million (U.S.) in funding last summer.

Mr. Malcolmson said that analysis of that data enables Bloomspot, which operates in 10 U.S. cities, to determine which customers who have bought, say, a 60-minute massage at New York’s Broadway Chiropractic for $39 (a “$270 value”) end up “acting like penny-pinchers and don’t spend well and don’t return,” and which ones instead treat the discount as an incentive and end up spending more money at the merchant: the goal of making the discount offer in the first place.

“The customers who are good receive follow-up offers, effectively in recognition of their spending behaviours,” he explained.

But Big Data isn’t just being used for newfangled loyalty marketing; many companies are using it to provide better service to customers in new ways. Kenna, a data analytics firm based in Mississauga, designed a mobile app to be used by customers of its client BASF Canada, the farming chemical company. BASF cross-references its customer purchase data with information on weather patterns to generate real-time information for farmers on when to apply the chemicals for greatest crop yield.
Simon_Houpt  massive_data_sets  data_mining  real-time  data  data_driven  personalization  agriculture  Kenna  Live_Nation  loyalty_management  dynamic_pricing  Broadway  Bloomspot  purchase_data 
january 2012 by jerryking
The State of Jay-Z's Empire - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 22, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JOHN JURGENSEN,
He's worth an estimated $450 million and hobnobs with Bill Gates and
Warren Buffett. How the Brooklyn-born performer has become the leading
music impresario of his generation.
Jay-Z  moguls  Live_Nation  music_industry  branding  partnerships  celebrities  impresarios 
october 2010 by jerryking
Breakingviews | Live Nation
Considered view
14 Jul 2010 22:12
By Rob Cox
Live_Nation 
july 2010 by jerryking

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