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jerryking : london   73

Past mistakes carry warnings for the future of work
May 21, 2019 | Financial Times | by SARAH O'CONNOR.

* Data can mislead unless combined with grittier insights on the power structures that underpin it.
* William Kempster, a master mason who worked on St Paul's Cathedral in the 18th century, left wage records that helped expose a flaw in our understanding of the past.

It is often said that we should learn from the mistakes of the past. But we can also learn from the mistakes we make about the past. Seemingly smooth data can mislead unless it is combined with a grittier insight into the structures, contracts and power relationships that underpin the numbers. On that score, economists and politicians who want to make sense of today’s labour market have an advantage over historians: it is happening right now, just outside their offices, in all its complexity and messiness. All they have to do is open the door
17th_century  18th_century  builders  contextual  data  datasets  developing_countries  economic_history  economists  freelancing  gig_economy  handwritten  historians  human_cloud_platforms  insights  labour_markets  London  messiness  mistakes  politicians  power_relations  power_structures  record-keeping  United_Kingdom  unstructured_data  wages  white-collar 
may 2019 by jerryking
Is Thomas Goode a sleeping giant of British retail?
August 31, 2018 | Financial Times | by Horatia Harrod.

200 year old Thomas Goode & Co is a homewares powerhouse.... Outfitted in morning suits, the staff — many of whom have worked at Thomas Goode for more than two decades — are solicitous and impeccably well-informed. There’s only one thing lacking. Customers....Johnny Sandelson, is the property entrepreneur who acquired the store for an undisclosed amount in July 2018. .....Sandelson has set himself the task of waking the company up — and it’s going to take more than just turning on the lights. What is required is a 21st-century overhaul....Thomas Goode sells more over the phone than it does online, for the simple reason it has no ecommerce platform. Some 40 per cent of its £5m in annual sales comes from special orders — a loyal client outfitting their new yacht or private jet — but oligarchs alone are unlikely to keep the business afloat....The plan, Sandelson says, is to democratise. “Fortnums did it, Smythson did it. Those great British brands reinvented themselves to become relevant to the affluent middle classes, but Thomas Goode didn’t.”.......Sandelson hopes that, in an age of experiential retail, the shop’s peerless service will entice a new generation of customers. He’s also eyeing up collaborations to reach those for whom the Thomas Goode name has little resonance.......Parts of the business that had lain dormant are to be revived, with an injection of £10m-£15m in investment. There’s a voluminous archive to be mined for designs, and production of tableware in the Thomas Goode name is being restarted at factories in Stoke-on-Trent......Sandelson is committed to a revival. “We’re unashamedly proud of our British heritage and our British brand,” he says. “To honour that, you have to be involved with a very high standard of manufacturing in Britain. There would be cheaper ways of going about things, but the British way stands for quality. Stoke-on-Trent has been producing beautiful plates for 200 years. So it works for us.”....Almost inevitably, the top floors of the South Audley Street flagship are to be turned into luxury flats. “Will we be able to afford a shop of this scale in the coming years?” says Sandelson. “I think the brand is bigger than the premises. I’m pursuing the dream on the basis that the building will be developed over time and we’ll hope to have a space within it.”
21st._century  brands  commercial_real_estate  entrepreneur  experiential_marketing  gift_ideas  heritage  history  homewares  London  luxury  middle_class  property_development  real_estate  retailers  restorations  revitalization  turnarounds  United_Kingdom  Victorian 
september 2018 by jerryking
Cause or effect? The link between gentrification and violent crime
July 12, 2018 | | Financial Times | by Nathan Brooker YESTERDAY.

London, which is experiencing a sustained increase in violent offences as crime rates in other global cities such as New York, Sydney and Hong Kong continue to fall......The escalation of violence has been linked to provocation on social media, increased competition in the drugs trade, a reduction in police measures such as stop and search and an overall drop in police funding— the Met has seen its annual budget cut by about 20 per cent since 2010-11, and it has lost 10 per cent of its police officers in that time......However, one factor that is often overlooked and, according to professional and academic observers, has played a key role in exacerbating London’s recent crime wave, is its gentrifying property market.

Areas of London that have higher levels of deprivation also tend to have higher crime rates.........The level of violence you see is getting much more extreme......Gentrification has had a significant impact on the area....“One of the issues young people have in Hackney Wick is the lack of aspiration, the lack of hope,” says Allen. “They’re all living in a rich, diverse city, but it still feels very separate to them. It’s not their development; it’s somebody else’s. They think they won’t be able to live in the area they were brought up in because they’re not going to be able to spend £600,000 on an apartment.”.........gentrification has not only affected gang recruitment..... it has fundamentally altered how some gangs operate.........“It changed their idea of territory, since some senior members were forced out of the area [by the redevelopment] and had to commute in, for want of a better term,” he says. “Ten years ago there was a very strong connection to territory. There was an emotional connection. But the redevelopment changed that. The only territory that was left was the market place — the drugs market place — and that needs to be protected.”

It’s the protection of that market — one both lucrative and highly nebulous — that is behind some of the increase in violent crime. Without the clear boundaries an estate or a postcode might provide, he says, and with the high value of the drugs trade upping the stakes, transgressions are met with more intense violence.....The reasons behind the dramatic decline in New York’s murder count are much argued over: the growing economy, the end of the crack epidemic have all been put up as possible causes. Yet improvements to policing brought in under former New York police commissioner Bill Bratton cannot be overlooked.

Bratton’s policies, which included clampdowns on various low-level offences, and an increase in stop-question-and-frisk, are often mischaracterised as a zero-tolerance approach to policing, he says.

“What he really did was a management innovation.” Bratton, who was in the office 1994-96 and returned in 2014-16, introduced CompStat, measures that used computer programs to map where and when crimes were taking place, and how police resources were being shared. “When [Bratton] took over, the largest number of cops were on the day shift, but the largest number of crimes took place on the evening shift and the night shift,” he says. Bratton reallocated officers accordingly. They had a slogan: “Put cops on the dots”.......the most important thing Bratton did, Kleiman says, was make management more accountable, hauling in three precinct captains each week to grill them on their CompStat data. During his first year as commissioner, Bratton replaced something like two-thirds of the city’s 76 precinct commanders......The problem with fear is that it’s an unhelpful response. Fear raises money for private security firms, not community programmes; it improves funding to free schools, not failing academies; it promotes only the most brutal, careless forms of policing. In communities that are undergoing gentrification, fear further divides the haves and the have-nots: decreasing the kinds of relationships that might aid social mobility and better connect disadvantaged youth with the city they live in.

And what gets forgotten, says Allen, is that fear goes both ways. “A lot of the young people that get caught up in youth violence are caught up because they’re vulnerable and they’re frightened,”
accountability  Bill_Bratton  budget_cuts  carding  causality  CompStat  criminality  criminal_justice_system  data  deprivations  disaffection  fear  gentrification  homicides  killings  London  New_York_City  NYPD  organized_crime  policing  property_markets  redevelopments  United_Kingdom  violent_crime  youth 
july 2018 by jerryking
The dumb-bell economy: inside the booming business of exercise
FEBRUARY 9, 2018 | FT | Jo Ellison.

Where once consumers looked for acquisitions to express their status, our spending habits are shifting towards more holistic expenditures. In the past 20 years, the leisure industry has emerged as one of the most dynamic, disruptive and fashionable of forces. It’s all part of a new focus on the “lifestyle experience”, a trend that has possessed consumers and found luxury brands spiking with sporty new offerings — sneakers, leggings, apps and accessories — designed to harness the burgeoning market. As Harvey Spevak, the executive chairman and managing partner of the Equinox group, likes to say: “Health is the new wealth.”
.....2019 will see the first Equinox hotel opening in New York’s Hudson Yards, the first in a rollout of Equinox hotels earmarked for billions more in investment. The hotels will be founded on the same full-service ideal as the clubs. “Our vision for the hotels is to cater to the high-performance traveller,” says Spevak, “and we think about it as we do, historically, from a science perspective. We call it MNR — movement, nutrition and recovery — where a high-performance lifestyle and a healthy lifestyle is a three-legged stool.”.....as our lives have become busier, atomised and more urban, the gym has emerged as the new place in which to gather: to be part of a community....not only are millennials more likely to buy gym memberships, they’re driving the boutique business as well. The rise of the group workout, club membership and all of the attendant accessories that come with it have become part of the new language of “wellness”......Where you work out, who you work out with, and what you wear to work out in have become totems of fashionability. Spevak traces the first shoots of the wellness trend to 9/11, when he saw a jump in the number of people becoming focused on holistic health and taking care of themselves.
....But more than anything, the fitness boom must be a corollary of a digital revolution in which working out has become a ubiquitous feature of our online life; ....Minton agrees that a gym’s success depends on cultivating this tribal loyalty, delivering a unique experience and then selling product that marks its members out. “Some of the most interesting clubs are those that are expanding into less obvious areas,” he says. “We now have over 600 boutiques across the UK and they are growing faster than traditional gyms as they have a smaller footprint and can take pop-up spaces.......The experiential market is throwing a lifeline to retailers, as well. “The fashion link is growing,” adds Minton. “Fitness apparel brands like Lululemon, Sweaty Betty, Reebok, Nike all now offer free in-store workouts, which provide them with an opportunity to market their brand lifestyles more directly and forge a connection with the consumer.”.......“The demise of retail is a permanent shift,” says Spevak. “It doesn’t mean retail’s going to go away, but it’s going to look very different. The consumer, in my opinion, will continue to buy nice things for themselves, but I think in the scheme of priorities the experience is more important than the handbag.”
fitness  exercise  London  United_Kingdom  gyms  wellness  rollouts  strength_training  boutiques  leisure  Equinox  millennials  experiential_marketing  small_spaces  pop-ups  non-obvious  upscale  retailers  in-store  digital_revolution 
february 2018 by jerryking
Like great coffee, good ideas take time to percolate
Tim Harford FEBRUARY 2, 2018.

why do some obviously good idea take so long to spread?

Even if you don’t much care about London’s coffee scene, this is an important question. William Gibson, science fiction author, observed that the future is already here — it’s just not evenly distributed....Researchers at the OECD have concluded that within most sectors (for example, coal mining or food retail) there is a large and rising gap in productivity between the typical business and the 100 leading companies in the sector. The leading businesses are nearly 15 times more productive per worker, and almost five times more productive even after adjusting for their use of capital such as buildings, computers and machinery......If there were some way to help good ideas to spread more quickly, more people would have good coffee and much else besides....good ideas can be slow to spread, even when they are straightforward to grasp. In his classic textbook, The Diffusion of Innovations, Everett Rogers points out that many inventions have to cross a cultural divide: the person preaching the good idea is often quite different to the person being preached to. Rogers would probably not have been surprised to see that “not invented here” was a barrier to good practice.....good advice can work, but even good advice wears off. And we can all be resistant to new ideas. The status quo is comfortable, especially for the people who get to call the shots.....An extreme example of resistance to change lies behind the quip that “science advances one funeral at a time”, based on an observation from the physicist Max Planck. A team of economists has studied the evidence from data on academic citations, and found that Planck seems to have been right: the premature death of a star scientist opens up his or her field to productive contributions from outsiders in other domains. People can be so slow to change their minds that we literally have to wait for them to die.

There is an analogy in the marketplace: sometimes old businesses have to die before productivity improves, although that can mean desperate hardship for the workers involved...there is evidence that US industry is becoming less dynamic: there are fewer shocks, and companies respond less to them. The OECD research, too, suggests that the productivity laggards tend to be further behind in markets that are over-regulated or otherwise shielded from competition.

All too often, we don’t pick up good ideas willingly. We grasp for them, in desperation, only when we have no choice (for example, when were facing a crisis, man-made or natural).
barriers_to_adoption  books  cultural_divides  coffee  crisis  customer_adoption  desperation  ideas  ideaviruses  inventions  London  not-invented-here  powerlaw  productivity  science_fiction  status_quo  Tim_Harford  unevenly_distributed  virality  William_Gibson 
february 2018 by jerryking
In the fashion industry, McShopping has gone global - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
PUBLISHED AUGUST 7, 2017

invaded by the same global chains that have made the shopping streets of the world's great cities all start to look the same. In the main shopping districts of Paris, Madrid, London or Toronto, the invasion of the same global chains (e.g. Zara, H&M, Primark & Uniqlo) that have made the shopping streets of the world's great cities all start to look the same. It's destroying the visual identities of cities once visited for their unique charm.

The cheap-chic revolution has brought affordable fashion to the masses and, thanks to better monitoring of offshore factories, provided millions of decent jobs in developing countries. It also has its downsides. Massive amounts of "disposable" clothing end up in landfills each year. When clothes are this cheap, we don't think twice about chucking what we bought last month for something even trendier. Instead of four fashion seasons, we now have at least 12...... department stores are a dying breed. Those that survive will likely only do so by going global.
Konrad_Yakabuski  fast-fashion  fashion  apparel  retailers  department_stores  brands  globalization  concentration  identity  Uniqlo  H&M  HBC  Zara  Paris  Madrid  London  Toronto  disposability  Primark  uniqueness  J.Crew 
january 2018 by jerryking
A Website for Pop-Up Stores Attracts Funding - WSJ
By Peter Grant
Oct. 10, 2017

(For John Corless)

A venture-capital firm that focuses on real-estate technology is investing in a London startup that has created an online marketplace for pop-up stores.

Fifth Wall Ventures, which is backed by big names in the real-estate world like Hines, CBRE Group Inc. and Macerich Co. , has made a “significant” investment in Appear Here, according to Brendan Wallace, Fifth Wall’s managing partner. He declined to specify an amount or how much of an ownership stake Fifth Wall is taking.

Founded in 2013, Appear Here has hooked up thousands of retailers with landlords in London and other U.K. cities, and its website currently includes more than 100,000 brands looking for space. The company, which enables retailers to sign leases for days or months, also has expanded to Paris and, earlier this year, New York.....London retailers leasing space through Appear Here and its competitors, like Hire Space and We Are Pop Up, also have turned marginal neighborhoods into hubs for new and edgy retail concepts. That hip vibe sometimes has lured big name retailers to those areas as well.

“The idea that online retail is going to kill physical retail is a complete fabrication,” Mr. Bailey said. “Every online retailer I know is wanting to open up physical stores the same way that every traditional retailer is moving online.”
e-commerce  venture_capital  start_ups  Appear_Here  pop-ups  websites  funding  retailers  landlords  London  CBRE 
october 2017 by jerryking
Don't be daft, London is still a world-class city -
August 28, 2017 | The Globe and Mail| by Marcus Gee.

Are London's glory years coming to an end? Don't bet on it. In fact, its recent troubles may turn out to be no more than a blip in its dazzling rise......Despite the sixties upswing symbolized by Twiggy, Carnaby Street and the Beatles, London was a city in decline. Crime was on the rise. Many Londoners were fleeing to the suburbs or leaving the country altogether. The city's population fell by two million between 1939 and 1979, reports Tom Dyckhoff in his recent book The Age of Spectacle. From 1961 to 1971 alone, London lost 600,000 residents. Jobs fled, too, as the docks declined and manufacturers left for greener pastures......then something unexpected and quite wonderful began to happen. Middle-class people attracted to the charm of the old began to move into beat-up parts of the city. Boutiques started popping up in rundown districts such as Covent Garden. A wave of financial deregulation made London a hub for banking and other financial services, creating hundreds of thousands of jobs and drawing people from Europe and around the world. Governments started investing in the city again. The Tube network was expanded and refurbished. The glorious St. Pancras Station, once threatened with demolition, was made over as a glistening portal for rail travellers. Foreign money flooded in.

The past 20 years have transformed London from the decaying capital of a clapped-out postimperial power to a humming world city where Land Rovers roam the avenues, tourists flock to ride the London Eye and Russian oligarchs build swimming pools under their Georgian townhouses......Prime Minister Theresa May [is attempting] to come up with a coherent plan to do the impossible: keep the advantages of belonging to the EU without actually being a member......The city still boasts many advantages. Not least of them is the fact that it is, well, London.

As its former mayor (now Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs) Boris Johnson puts it in his book The Spirit of London, the city is a global brand. Its pull is magnetic, its resilience famous. "It is plainly a city that can come back from almost anything – massacre, fire, plague, blitz."

There are practical reasons to bet on London, too. As much as Londoners complain about it, the public transportation system in the birthplace of the subway is a wonder. Looking to the future, the city is bulking up with the huge Crossrail project, designed to link the city's east and west.
Marcus_Gee  world-class  London  Brexit  decline  '70s  deregulation  revitalization  cities  books  financial_services 
august 2017 by jerryking
Lex. London and Europe:hard-wired advantages
July 7, 2017 | Financial Times | Lex.

This hints at a wider strength. Laying cables across the sea was a high-risk venture in the 1850s. The risk was deemed worth taking because London was the financial centre of a trading empire. The city’s present-day concentration of expertise in areas like forex, trade finance, risk management, insurance and law is also a function of this mercantile history. Other European financial centres tend to have more specific strengths, such as asset management in Dublin and Luxembourg, or banking in Frankfurt.

More fibre could be installed across Europe, but that alone will not alter much. Europe’s politicians and regulators will find it harder to replicate London’s other strengths, however much they may wish to capitalise on the UK’s departure from the EU or secure regulatory oversight of euro-related clearing.

Their best hope of doing so is ham-fisted policymaking in the UK. There are precedents aplenty. President John Kennedy gifted London the Eurobond market in the 1960s. The Parti Québécois helped Toronto supplant Montreal as Canada’s financial capital in the 1980s. It is much easier to drive business away than it is to attract it — something the UK government, pondering its “red lines” over things like immigration and the remit of the ECJ, should bear in mind.
transatlantic  London  ECB  regulators  policymaking  competitive_advantage  epicenters  Brexit  poaching  red_lines 
august 2017 by jerryking
U.S. Cyberweapons, Used Against Iran and North Korea, Are a Disappointment Against ISIS - The New York Times
By DAVID E. SANGER and ERIC SCHMITT JUNE 12, 2017.

In 2016, U.S. cyberwarriors began training their arsenal of cyberweapons on a more elusive target, internet use by the Islamic State. Thus far, the results have been a consistent disappointment......The effectiveness of the nation’s arsenal of cyberweapons hit its limits against an enemy that exploits the internet largely to recruit, spread propaganda and use encrypted communications, all of which can be quickly reconstituted after American “mission teams” freeze their computers or manipulate their data..... the U.S. is rethinking how cyberwarfare techniques, first designed for fixed targets like nuclear facilities, must be refashioned to fight terrorist groups that are becoming more adept at turning the web into a weapon......one of the rare successes against the Islamic State belongs at least in part to Israel, which was America’s partner in the attacks against Iran’s nuclear facilities. Top Israeli cyberoperators penetrated a small cell of extremist bombmakers in Syria months ago, the officials said. That was how the United States learned that the terrorist group was working to make explosives that fooled airport X-ray machines and other screening by looking exactly like batteries for laptop computers......ISIS' agenda and tactics make it a particularly tough foe for cyberwarfare. The jihadists use computers and social media not to develop or launch weapons systems but to recruit, raise money and coordinate future attacks.

Such activity is not tied to a single place, as Iran’s centrifuges were, and the militants can take advantage of remarkably advanced, low-cost encryption technologies. The Islamic State, officials said, has made tremendous use of Telegram, an encrypted messaging system developed largely in Germany......disruptions often require fighters to move to less secure communications, making them more vulnerable. Yet because the Islamic State fighters are so mobile, and their equipment relatively commonplace, reconstituting communications and putting material up on new servers are not difficult.
ISIS  NSA  security_&_intelligence  disappointment  Israel  encryption  disruption  London  London_Bridge  tools  cyber_security  cyberweapons  vulnerabilities  terrorism  Pentagon  U.S._Cyber_Command  campaigns  David_Sanger 
june 2017 by jerryking
Where Finance and Technology Come Together - The New York Times
By NATHANIEL POPPERNOV. 14, 2016.

Several cities around the world are competing to become the capital, or at least one of the regional capitals, of fintech. If the young financial technology industry has the transformative effect that some have imagined, the contest could also determine the future capitals of finance as a whole.

At the recent Money 2020 conference in Las Vegas, the largest fintech conference in the world, government representatives from Dublin, Hong Kong, London, Luxembourg and Belfast, Northern Ireland, among others, were walking the floor looking to woo companies.
fin-tech  London  Berlin  Hong_Kong  Dublin 
november 2016 by jerryking
University challenge
25 June/26 June 2016 | Evernote Web - FT | by Thomas Hale and Gonzalo Vina
Colleges_&_Universities  tools  finance  debt  London  investment_banking  real_estate 
june 2016 by jerryking
Financial PR spins a new global story — FT.com
MAY 6, 2016 by: By Shannon Bond and James Fontanella-Khan in New York and Arash Massoudi in London

Leading financial communications companies from New York to Hong Kong are responding to growing demand for “whisperers” with global, political and digital nous. Nowadays, PR firms are expected to craft a corporate narrative that works across different markets, to handle complex relations with governments whose interests often diverge and to provide rapid-response crisis management.
crisis_management  Wall_Street  London  Communicating_&_Connecting  boutiques  public_relations  government_relations  consolidation  financial_communications  rapid-response 
may 2016 by jerryking
City of holes
23 April/24 April 2016 | Financial Times | by Edwin Heathcote
architecture  construction  London  cities  design 
april 2016 by jerryking
Pied a Terre restauranteur dips a toe into barbecue chains
October 23, 2015 | Financial Times | Malcolm Moore

Malcolm Moore on a perfectionist adding casual dining to his repertoire

David Moore says he is not a perfectionist but he is fibbing. For 25 ye...
casual_dining  restaurants  restauranteurs  BBQ  London  United_Kingdom 
december 2015 by jerryking
What my Goldman Sachs training taught me about entrepreneurship - FT.com
March 31, 2015 2:17 pm
What my Goldman Sachs training taught me about entrepreneurship
Jason Gissing
United_Kingdom  alumni  Goldman_Sachs  London  entrepreneur  traders 
november 2015 by jerryking
Tech City News: London to host first Food Tech Week
Weblog post. Newstex Trade & Industry Blogs, Newstex. Oct 1, 2015.

ProQuest Central: hackathon and food and distribut*

October will see the launch of London's first ever 'Food Tech Week' which will be celebrating all things food and facilitating tec...
London  United_Kingdom  product_launches  food  technology  hackathons  disruption  ecosystems  brands  fresh_produce  innovation  food_tech 
october 2015 by jerryking
Meet the Zaouis
23 May 2015 | Financial Times | Jonathan Guthrie.

The business plan for their M&A advisory firm was essentially a Post-it note reading 'Allons-y!" But in the two years since they set it up, broth...
finance  financiers  investment_banking  London  United_Kingdom  start_ups  boutiques  mergers_&_acquisitions 
july 2015 by jerryking
Britain resigns as a world power
May 21, 2015 |The Washington Post | Fareed Zakaria
"I was struck by just how parochial it has become. After an extraordinary 300-year run, Britain has essentially resigned as a global power.

Over the next few years, Britain’s army will shrink to about 80,000."... Why does this matter? Because on almost all global issues, Britain has a voice that is intelligent, engaged and forward-looking. It wants to strengthen and uphold today’s international system — one based on the free flow of ideas, goods and services around the world, one that promotes individual rights and the rule of law.

This is not an accident. Britain essentially created the world we live in. In his excellent book “God and Gold,” Walter Russell Mead points out that in the 16th century many countries were poised to advance economically and politically — Northern Italy’s city-states, the Hanseatic League, the Low Countries, France, Spain. But Britain managed to edge out the others, becoming the first great industrial economy and the modern world’s first superpower. It colonized and shaped countries and cultures from Australia to India to Africa to the Western Hemisphere, including of course, its settlements in North America. Had Spain or Germany become the world’s leading power, things would look very different today.
BBC  books  cosmopolitan  cost-cutting  cutbacks  David_Cameron  drawdowns  EU  Fareed_Zakaria  foreign_policy  forward_looking  geopolitics  globalization  industrial_economy  international_relations  international_system  internationalism  leadership  London  middle-powers  parochialism  punch-above-its-weight  retreats  rule_of_law  superpowers  United_Kingdom  Walter_Russell_Mead 
may 2015 by jerryking
In the Dark Corners of the Web, a `Spider' Intercepts Hackers
April 22, 2015 | Bloomberg Business| by Edward Robinson

Encircling enterprises with digital force fields to protect against invasion is an outdated strategy, as the intrusions at JPMorgan Chase, Sony, and Target have demonstrated, according to James Chappell, Digital Shadows’ co-founder and chief technology officer. IT systems have simply become too open and diffuse to keep the bad guys out.
“Social media, long supply chains, mobile technology. There is now so much that no longer lives within the castle walls; it lives beyond them,” he says. “You can no longer assume that you’ll never be hacked. You have to assume that you will be.”
Enter the spider, a program of the firm’s own design. Crawling through shadowy corners such as the Deep Web and the Tor network, the program searches 80 million data sources in 26 languages for signs that Digital Shadows’ clients are at risk.
cyberattacks  Digital_Shadows  cyber_security  banks  hackers  malware  United_Kingdom  London  data_breaches  dark_web  pre-emption  network_risk  cyberintrusions  left_of_the_boom 
may 2015 by jerryking
Ex-Currency Trader Braves Tumultuous Market - NYTimes.com
By JENNY ANDERSON SEPTEMBER 17, 2014.

The forex market is being radically reshaped by new regulation and technology.

Mark Taylor, dean of Warwick Business School and a professor of finance, said he expected more regulation. “It’s a tough market to regulate because by definition, it’s a global financial market,” he said. “So where do you regulate it?”

Many banks have quietly lamented changes in foreign exchange market, specifically a move toward more online and thus transparent trading where spreads are thinner and profits smaller, but Mr. Sabet appeared more reconciled to the changes.

“The financial world is being completely regulated,” he said. Everything is becoming electronic and automated, he said, which makes compliance easier. “A human can’t make a mistake because a human is not involved.”
currencies  traders  London  fin-tech  foreign_exchange  turbulence  turmoil  volatility 
september 2014 by jerryking
Menswear Around the World - WSJ
Aug. 22, 2014 | WSJ | By TODD PLUMMER.

An authentic energy infuses the images he shoots for his four-year-old street-style blog, Men in This Town, which he has turned into a book of the same name, available Sept. 2, 2014.
mens'_clothing  fashion  stylish  Sydney  London  New_York_City  Milan  Tokyo  blogs 
august 2014 by jerryking
Ex-Harper chief of staff Nigel Wright rejoins Onex - The Globe and Mail
BOYD ERMAN AND DANIEL LEBLANC
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 04 2014
Nigel_Wright  Onex  private_equity  London  chief_of_staff  Boyd_Erman 
june 2014 by jerryking
Barclays was the last British 'Master of the Universe' - The Globe and Mail
CARL MORTISHED
Barclays was the last British 'Master of the Universe' Add to ...
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
LONDON — Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May. 12 2014
London  United_Kingdom  investment_banking  Barclays 
may 2014 by jerryking
London's Former Investment Bankers Are Joining the Start-Up Craze - NYTimes.com
March 19, 2014, 12:41 pm
London’s Former Investment Bankers Are Joining the Start-Up Craze
By MARK SCOTT
start_ups  London  United_Kingdom  innovation  banks  financial_services  finance  mobile_applications  fin-tech  Yahoo! 
march 2014 by jerryking
Auction Houses Muscle In on Art Galleries' Turf
OCTOBER 20, 2013 |- Barrons.com|By MARY M. LANE
Auction Houses Muscle In on Art Galleries' Turf
Contemporary-Art Boom, Margin Pressures Force Christie's, Sotheby's to Evolve.

For decades, the art business thrived on a symbiosis between galleries and auction houses. Galleries and the dealers who ran them traditionally made long-term investments in discovering and developing young artists, placing their artworks with influential collectors whose patronage would further an artist's reputation and ultimately increase his selling prices.

Auction houses, for their part, provided a lucrative secondary market for the most enduring of those artworks, but rarely handled trendy new artists.
[image] Christie's Images Ltd

Sales of highly experimental works, such as 'To Meet My Past,' by Tracey Emin, typically have been handled privately; the work went for $778,900 at a Christie's auction.

Now, a boom in the contemporary-art market and margin pressures in the auction business are changing all that. Those forces are prompting the houses to experiment with new ways of auctioning art and to arrange more private sales of contemporary works outside the auction room, where profits are richer.

Increasingly Sotheby's and Christie's are catering to a new breed of art buyers from the hedge-fund world and emerging economies who prefer to quickly acquire big-name pieces of art instead of building relationships with galleries where they might buy the art more cheaply.

Last year, private-contract sales of fine art accounted for $1 billion of Christie's $6.27 billion of revenue and $906.5 million of Sotheby's $5.4 billion. That's a big jump from before the global financial crisis: In 2006, Christie's sold $256 million of art in private sales, while
art  artists  auctions  dealerships  Christie's  Sotheby's  galleries  London  collectors  patronage  art_galleries  secondary_markets  hedge_funds  symbiosis  contemporary_art 
october 2013 by jerryking
One final ignominy for a pioneer of abstract art
Sep. 26 2013 | - The Globe and Mail | RUSSELL SMITH

We Canadians shouldn’t be shocked – we ourselves have little concept of placing historical markers of cultural grandeur in our cities. We don’t name our streets after our artists, even when a great artist lived there. We don’t even put up plaques on their former houses. Our municipal governments have no interest in turning our dull concrete grids into a series of references to fantasy – as the streets of Paris and London, for example, are; there, you can walk and meet ghosts of both authors and fictional characters; not only can you see who died of consumption in a garret upstairs, but also whose character did. These plaques lay a fictional city over a real one. (Oh well, you might say, Canada is not famous for its art anyway. And I would say, yes, and this is why.)
Russell_Smith  art  Russia  ideacity  culture  history  overlay_networks  fantasy  wayfinding  artists  cities  virtual_worlds  cityscapes  iconic  street_furniture  landmarks  metaphysical  London  Paris  imagination 
september 2013 by jerryking
Table Talk With Simon Schama | Cuisine With History - WSJ.com
September 19, 2013 | WSJ | Paul Levy.

With his documentary series "The Story of the Jews" currently on the BBC and the first volume of the accompanying book published this month, we sat down with Mr. Schama at Mishkin's deli in London, which calls itself "a kind of Jewish deli."


What did he think of the food?"It's so much better than when I was last here," he says. "The matzo ball soup I ordered just as a test is perfect. The salt beef is magnificent, though I'd have liked it a little less lean—it's Aberdeen Angus and cured here."
Simon_Schama  recipes  historians  fish  delicatessens  London 
september 2013 by jerryking
Anatomy of a Song: The Clash's 'London Calling' - WSJ.com
August 29, 2013 | WSJ | By MARC MYERS

The Sound of Going to Pieces: The Clash's surviving members recount the making of a punk anthem
music  punk  '70s  London  United_Kingdom  songs 
august 2013 by jerryking
International: Mining the urban data
Nov 21st 2012 | The Economist | Ludwig Siegele: deputy international editor, The Economist from The World In 2013 print edition
cities  urban  data  smartphones  smart_cities  London  Singapore  sensors  mit  SENSEable  exhaust_data  optimization  real-time 
january 2013 by jerryking
Michael Tory: From Lehman’s ashes, a banker is reborn
Dec. 15 2012 | The Globe and Mail | ERIC REGULY.

Mr. Tory had launched a firm called Quattro Partners, since recast as Ondra Partners, which he tailored to the harsh new reality of the post-Lehman world. It would be a pure advisory firm, making it rare, perhaps unique, in London’s cluttered investment banking industry, where the transaction – and the typically fat fee that goes with it – utterly dominates the business model. In the deliciously brutal argot of the street, this is known as “eat what you kill.”

Ondra would make advice its only activity; the firm’s livelihood would not depend on transactions such as debt underwritings or success fees on mergers and acquisitions. It would only take on clients who would pay retainers to cover Ondra’s running costs, with any discretionary transaction-related fees adding to profit.

None of the partners would get stinking rich, but, equally, they would not have to act as shills, eternally pushing services or products because they paid jackpot returns, not necessarily because they were in the best interests of the client. ...Ondra is becoming a player in the City, as London’s financial district is known. Its name is popping up regularly in the financial press and its clients are getting bigger. They include GDF Suez, Prudential, Société Générale and National Grid.
Eric_Reguly  London  United_Kingdom  investment_banking  Ondra  start_ups  eat_what_you_kill  boutiques  John_Tory 
december 2012 by jerryking
In London, Nimble Start-Ups Offer Alternatives to Stodgy Banks
October 22, 2012 | NYT |By MARK SCOTT.

London’s fast-growing start-up scene is trying to disrupt the financial status quo. As consumers’ trust in banks deteriorates because of a series of recent scandals, young companies are pressing their newcomer advantage. Firms are offering services like low-cost foreign currency exchange and new ways for small business to borrow cash.

Backed by venture capital firms like Index Ventures, the financial start-ups are taking on entrenched incumbents by using technology to pare back costs and improve the customer experience. Local authorities do not directly regulate many of the firms, but the young companies often use traditional banks and other financial firms for their back-office functions, like processing payments, which are monitored by British regulators.
London  United_Kingdom  start_ups  banks  financial_services  finance  regulators  mobile_applications  fin-tech  foreign_exchange  nimbleness  back-office 
october 2012 by jerryking
London: the Mayor’s-eye view - The Globe and Mail
Ashley Prime

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jul. 20 2012
book_reviews  London  United_Kingdom  mayoral 
july 2012 by jerryking
Companies close to home need your help
Nov. 2, 2011 | The Financial Times p12.| Luke Johnson.

Two recent books, independently published on either side of the Atlantic, have each drawn parallels between the "slow food" movement and the idea of investing locally. The slow food concept was pioneered in Italy in 1986, to champion small-scale producers and regional ingredients, as a backlash against global fast-food operators such as McDonald's. Now this philosophy is being extended to the financial sector.

The British title is Slow Finance: why investment miles matter by Gervais Williams,
The US book is Locavesting: the revolution in local investing and how to profit from it , by Amy Cortese.

the City of London is largely failing as a provider of capital for British business. The new-issue market for domestic companies has almost disappeared in recent years - all the activity is in trading second-hand shares and floating overseas companies like mining concerns from Africa or Russia. So if mainstream investing institutions such as pension funds are not backing British enterprise, then individuals should look to channel their savings directly into local ventures. For just as a society that won't reproduce commits a form of suicide, so if we fail to invest in our own industries, then we face inevitable economic decline.
local  locavore  investing  books  crowd_funding  Luke_Johnson  microproducers  slow_food  backlash  investors  economic_decline  London  small-scale  finance  funding  fin-tech  decline 
november 2011 by jerryking
How Cities Go Global
Autumn 2009 | The Wilson Quarterly. Vol. 33, Iss. 4; pg. 71, 2
pgs | Anonymous.
THE SOURCE: "Cities in Today's Global Age" by Saskia Sassen, in Hie SAIS
Review, Winter-Spring 2009. About 70 global cities, on every continent
except Antarctica, provide crucial expertise in insurance, accounting,
law, consulting, and programming for firms and exchanges operating
across national borders. But far from being cookiecutter copies of one
another, they retain unique characteristics that are the sources of
their strength. The top-rated cities overall, London and New York, are
the leading financial, equity, and banking centers of the world,
according to Saskia Sassen, a sociologist at Columbia University. But
leadership in starting a business comes from Sydney, and in handling
derivatives contracts from Seoul.
ProQuest  cities  globalization  New_York_City  London  Chicago 
october 2010 by jerryking
Rogue Tailor Needles Savile Row, Gets Himself a (Law)Suit - WSJ.com
AUGUST 9, 2010 | WSJ | By SARA SCHAEFER MUñOZ. His Fancy Pants Aren't 'Bespoke' Enough for Some—Plus, He Blogs
bespoke  mens'_clothing  luxury  London 
august 2010 by jerryking
FT.com / Arts / Visual Arts - Afro Modern, Tate Liverpool
February 2 2010 | Financial Times | By Jackie Wullschlager. send to Ken & Roxanne
museums  art_galleries  art  African  galleries  Africa  London 
february 2010 by jerryking
London’s School of Life
July/August 2009 | Departures | By Rhoda Koenig. Equal
parts self-help, continuing ed, and highbrow social mixer, the School of
Life is an idiosyncratic temple of the mind. Possibly run this by Ross
Mayot as a way to grab market share from U of T' School of continuing ed
as well as growing a lead-in to June's idea city or November's CARP GM.

ideas for ideaCity:
buy ads at U of T continuing education.
buy ads at the continuing education programs for Toronto-area alums of Queens, UWO, Waterloo, etc.
crowdsource seeking the best ideas for how ideaCity could expand its market.
position ideaCity as a unique retirement gift.
position ideaCity as a unique retirement gift spousal gift
continuing_education  serendipity  London  ideas  life_long_learning  ideacity 
january 2010 by jerryking
Remaking London’s Fashion Scene - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 18, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by PAUL SONNE. Can
London Get Its Groove Back? Harold Tillman wants to revamp the city's
design scene. His first big test is upon him
turnarounds  moguls  fashion  retailers  London  United_Kingdom 
november 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / UK - The marketer who sees tourists in a green light
Published: September 5 2006 03:00 | Last updated: September 5
2006 03:00 Financial Times By Carlos Grande. Profiels James Bidwell, CEO
of Visit London and London Unlimited.
green  branding  sustainability  environmentally_friendly  tourism  London  2012_Olympics 
march 2009 by jerryking
Foraging - Foraging - The Monocle Shop in London - NYTimes.com
February 8, 2009 By KABIR CHIBBER, review of London: The Monocle Shop.
travel  review  stylish  Wallpaper  Monocle  London  stores 
february 2009 by jerryking

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