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jerryking : mit   63

Location Analytics: Bringing Geography Back
October 31, 2012 Reading Time: 11 min 
Simon Thompson (Esri), interviewed by Renee Boucher Ferguson
analytics  location_based_services  geography  Esri  MIT 
april 2018 by jerryking
Can big data revolutionise policymaking by governments?
January 30, 2018 | FT | Robin Wigglesworth in New York.

Alberto Cavallo is today a professor of applied economics at MIT, where he runs the Billion Prices Project with Roberto Rigobon, another MIT professor. The project started in 2006, during a period when the then-Argentine government was accused of manipulating its inflation data. Professors Cavallo and Rigobon realised that by compiling the online prices listed by Argentine retailers they could build a more accurate and contemporaneous measure of the true inflation rate....The project’s commercial arm, PriceStats, now collects enough data to provide daily inflation updates for 22 economies. “It was kind of an accident. But we quickly realised that it had applications elsewhere,” Prof Cavallo says....Quandl, an alternative data provider

The project is just one example of a broader trend of trawling the swelling sea of big data for clues on how companies, industries or entire economies are performing.
alternative_data_provider  informational_advantages  massive_data_sets  MIT  Quandl  policymaking 
february 2018 by jerryking
We Survived Spreadsheets, and We’ll Survive AI - WSJ
By Greg Ip
Updated Aug. 2, 2017

History and economics show that when an input such as energy, communication or calculation becomes cheaper, we find many more uses for it. Some jobs become superfluous, but others more valuable, and brand new ones spring into existence. Why should AI be different?

Back in the 1860s, the British economist William Stanley Jevons noticed that when more-efficient steam engines reduced the coal needed to generate power, steam power became more widespread and coal consumption rose. More recently, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-led study found that as semiconductor manufacturers squeezed more computing power out of each unit of silicon, the demand for computing power shot up, and silicon consumption rose.

The “Jevons paradox” is true of information-based inputs, not just materials like coal and silicon......Just as spreadsheets drove costs down and demand up for calculations, machine learning—the application of AI to large data sets—will do the same for predictions, argue Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans and Avi Goldfarb, who teach at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management. “Prediction about uncertain states of the world is an input into decision making,” they wrote in a recent paper. .....Unlike spreadsheets, machine learning doesn’t yield exact answers. But it reduces the uncertainty around different risks. For example, AI makes mammograms more accurate, the authors note, so doctors can better judge when to conduct invasive biopsies. That makes the doctor’s judgment more valuable......Machine learning is statistics on steroids: It uses powerful algorithms and computers to analyze far more inputs, such as the millions of pixels in a digital picture, and not just numbers but images and sounds. It turns combinations of variables into yet more variables, until it maximizes its success on questions such as “is this a picture of a dog” or at tasks such as “persuade the viewer to click on this link.”.....Yet as AI gets cheaper, so its potential applications will grow. Just as better weather forecasting makes us more willing to go out without an umbrella, Mr. Manzi says, AI emboldens companies to test more products, strategies and hunches: “Theories become lightweight and disposable.” They need people who know how to use it, and how to act on the results.
artificial_intelligence  Greg_Ip  spreadsheets  machine_learning  predictions  paradoxes  Jim_Manzi  experimentation  testing  massive_data_sets  judgment  uncertainty  economists  algorithms  MIT  Gilder's_Law  speed  steam_engine  operational_tempo  Jevons_paradox  decision_making 
august 2017 by jerryking
50 Smartest Companies 2016
Our editors pick the 50 companies that best combine innovative technology with an effective business model.

June 21, 2016

Each year we identify 50 companies that are “smart” in the way they create new opportunities. Some of this year’s stars are large companies, like Amazon and Alphabet, that are using digital technologies to redefine industries. Others are wrestling with technological changes: companies like Microsoft, Bosch, Toyota, and Intel. Also on the list are ambitious startups like 23andMe, a pioneer in consumer-accessible DNA testing; 24M, a reinventor of battery technology; and Didi Chuxing, a four-year-old ride-hailing app that’s beating Uber in the Chinese market.
MIT  lists  start_ups  large_companies  innovation  technology  business_models  job_search  23andMe 
june 2016 by jerryking
How Stanford Took On the Giants of Economics - The New York Times
SEPT. 10, 2015 | NYT | By NEIL IRWIN.

Stanford’s success with economists is part of a larger campaign to stake a claim as the country’s top university. Its draw combines a status as the nation’s “it” university — now with the lowest undergraduate acceptance rate and a narrow No. 2 behind Harvard for the biggest fund-raising haul — with its proximity to many of the world’s most dynamic companies. Its battle with Eastern universities echoes fights in other industries in which established companies, whether hotels or automobile makers, are being challenged by Silicon Valley money and entrepreneurship....reflection of a broader shift in the study of economics, in which the most cutting-edge work increasingly relies less on a big-brained individual scholar developing mathematical theories, and more on the ability to crunch extensive sets of data to glean insights about topics as varied as how incomes differ across society and how industries organize themselves....The specialties of the new recruits vary, but they are all examples of how the momentum in economics has shifted away from theoretical modeling and toward “empirical microeconomics,” the analysis of how things work in the real world, often arranging complex experiments or exploiting large sets of data. That kind of work requires lots of research assistants, work across disciplines including fields like sociology and computer science, and the use of advanced computational techniques unavailable a generation ago....Less clear is whether the agglomeration of economic stars at Stanford will ever amount to the kind of coherent school of thought that has been achieved at some other great universities (e.g. Milton Friedman's The Chicago School neoclassical focus on efficiency of markets and the risks of government intervention and M.I.T.’s economics' Keynesian tradition)
Chicago_School  economics  economists  Stanford  MIT  Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  recruiting  poaching  movingonup  rankings  machine_learning  cross-disciplinary  massive_data_sets  data  uChicago  microeconomics  Keynesian 
september 2015 by jerryking
The Analytics Mandate
May 12, 2014

by: DAVID KIRON, PAMELA KIRK PRENTICE AND RENEE BOUCHER FERGUSON
analytics  MIT  decision_making  data_driven  LBMA  location_based_services 
september 2015 by jerryking
In the age of disruptive innovation, adaptability is what matters most - The Globe and Mail
May. 13 2015 | The Globe and Mail |by EAMONN PERCY.

William Gibson, who coined the term Cyberspace, “The future is here, it’s just not evenly distributed yet.”

It is not the innovation itself that matters, but its implications during this transition. For the individual, the key will be how to take advantage of these changes, while protecting one’s family, business, career, investments and way of life.....In 2013, a study authored by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McFee at the MIT Sloan School of Management argued that advances in technology are largely behind the sluggish job growth and flattening median incomes over the last 10 to 15 years. They believe that the recent rapid advances in technology are destroying jobs more quickly than they are being created, contributing to the recent stagnation in income and the growth of inequality in the U.S. ... However, around the year 2000, this correlation diverged, with productivity continuing to rise but employment levels stagnating. They call the gap between increasing productivity and employment ‘the Great Decoupling,’ and the authors believe technology is behind it....the best way to both survive and then thrive in this coming transition is simple; embrace it as an Age of Adaptability. There is nothing an individual can do to stop these massive global trends in technology, economics, and demographics, other than adapt. Even reacting to the trends is insufficient, since their scale and velocity are will leave you scrambling to catch up, not mind getting ahead. The only solution is to adapt by becoming a lifelong learner, failing fast if necessary, and learning to get ahead of the changes.

This ability to adapt starts with a mindset that the status quo is not a safe haven, but the place of greatest risk. It means accepting complete responsibility for your destiny, rather than subordinating your well-being to other groups or people. It requires you to take 100 per cent control of your circumstances, particularly if you are responsible for a family, or other people in the form of a business. It entails moving to a state of absolute clarity and awareness of the coming onslaught of change, and then taking a personal leadership role in making incremental, but permanent, changes to your life now.
mindsets  information_overload  disruption  the_Great_Decoupling  Erik_Brynjolfsson  MIT  Andrew_McFee  economic_stagnation  adaptability  innovation  William_Gibson 
may 2015 by jerryking
The Chinese Billionaire Zhang Lei Spins Research Into Investment Gold
By ALEXANDRA STEVENSONAPRIL 2, 2015
By ALEXANDRA STEVENSONAPRIL 2, 2015

With an $18 billion war chest, Zhang Lei is one of China’s richest investors.

Starting 10 years ago with $20 million from Yale University’s endowment, Mr. Zhang was an early backer of companies like Tencent and JD.com, businesses that have shaken up traditional industries across China. Now he thinks these companies could stir things up globally.

“China could be one of the engines to this whole global innovation revolution,” Mr. Zhang said in an interview at the Hong Kong office of his firm, Hillhouse Capital Group, in one of the city’s tallest skyscrapers, with sweeping views of Victoria Harbor.

Across the ocean in Silicon Valley, Mr. Zhang represents China’s new entrepreneurial class. He has consulted with the likes of Mark Zuckerberg and Jeff Bezos, and visited with start-ups like Airbnb.
Zhang_Lei  high_net_worth  moguls  investors  MIT  Yale  endowments  Colleges_&_Universities  China  Chinese 
april 2015 by jerryking
Mirtle: Sloan conference leading Big Data revolution in sports - The Globe and Mail
JAMES MIRTLE
BOSTON — Globe and Mail Update (includes correction)
Published Thursday, Feb. 26 2015
sports  MIT  massive_data_sets  analytics  Moneyball  Octothorpe_Software 
february 2015 by jerryking
The changing face of employment - FT.com
January 30, 2015 12:41 pm
The changing face of employment
Gillian Tett

One widely cited statistic at the World Economic Forum was a projection that automation would end up replacing some 45 per cent of jobs in the US in the next 20 years. And the consensus was that it would be the middle tier of jobs that would disappear. The future of employment — at least according to Davos — is a world bifurcated between low-skilled, low-paid service jobs (say, dog walkers and cleaners) and highly skilled elite roles (computer programmers, designers and all the other jobs that Davos luminaries do). Everything else is potentially vulnerable....What is still critically unclear is how all this investment in infrastructure and training is going to be paid for. Philanthropy? Taxes? It is also unclear how mass access to the internet will recreate those disappearing mid-tier jobs. Given that, it is perhaps no surprise that when I asked a group of Davos grandees for a show of hands on whether income inequality would get worse in the coming years, almost everybody in the room voted “yes” — without hesitation. That is deeply sobering.
Gillian_Tett  WEF_Davos  innovation  middle_class  unemployment  mobile_phones  job_destruction  job_displacement  downward_mobility  hollowing_out  MIT  Erik_Brynjolfsson  automation  Andrew_McAfee 
january 2015 by jerryking
M.I.T.'s Alex Pentland: Measuring Idea Flows to Accelerate Innovation - NYTimes.com - NYTimes.com
April 15, 2014 | NYT | By STEVE LOHR.

Alex Pentland --“Social Physics: How Good Ideas Spread — The Lesson From a New Science.”

Mr. Pentland has been identified with concepts — and terms he has coined — related to the collection and interpretation of all that data, like “honest signals” and “reality mining.” His descriptive phrases are intended to make his point that not all data in the big data world is equal....Reality mining, for example, examines the data about what people are actually doing rather than what they are looking for or saying. Tracking a person’s movements during the day via smartphone GPS signals and credit-card transactions, he argues, are far more significant than a person’s web-browsing habits or social media comments....Central to the concept of social physics is the ability to measure communication and transactions as never before. Then, that knowledge about the flow of ideas can be used to accelerate the pace of innovation.

The best decision-making environment, Mr. Pentland says, is one with high levels of both “engagement” and “exploration.” Engagement is a measure of how often people in a group communicate with each other, sharing social knowledge. Exploration is a measure of seeking out new ideas and new people.

A golden mean is the ideal....[traders] with a balance of diversity of ideas in their trading network — engagement and exploration — had returns that were 30 percent ahead of isolated traders and well ahead of the echo chamber traders, too....The new data and measurement tools, he writes, allow for a “God’s eye view” of human activity. And with that knowledge, he adds, comes the potential to engineer better decisions in a “data-driven society.”
Alex_Pentland  books  cross-pollination  curiosity  data_scientists  data_driven  decision_making  massive_data_sets  MIT  Mydata  sensors  social_physics  Steve_Lohr  idea_generation  heterogeneity  ideas  intellectual_diversity  traders  social_data  signals  echo_chambers 
april 2014 by jerryking
Helping developers create smarter online music-streaming services
Jul 10, 2013 by Rob Matheson

Brian Whitman PhD '05 and Tristan Jehan SM '01, PhD '05 are co-founders of Echo Nest, whose technology—based on their MIT research—mines data from millions of songs streaming online. Sometimes called "the big data of music," the company has compiled about a trillion data points from 35 million songs by 2.5 million artists.

Its music-intelligence platform—recently praised in publications such as Fast Company, Wired and Business Insider, among others—then translates this data into information for music-app developers, who use the information to build smarter, more personalized music apps
streaming  music  MIT  massive_data_sets  platforms 
april 2014 by jerryking
What Machines Can’t Do - NYTimes.com
FEB. 3, 2014 | NYT | David Brooks.
here is what robots can't do -- create art, deep meaning, move our souls, help us to understand and thus operate in the world, inspire deeper thought, care for one another, help the environment where we live
========================================================================
We’re clearly heading into an age of brilliant technology.computers are increasingly going to be able to perform important parts of even mostly cognitive jobs, like picking stocks, diagnosing diseases and granting parole.

As this happens, certain mental skills will become less valuable because computers will take over (e.g. memorization)

what human skills will be more valuable? The age of brilliant machines seems to reward a few traits. First, it rewards enthusiasm, people driven to perform extended bouts of concentration, diving into and trying to make sense of these bottomless information oceans. Second, the era seems to reward people with extended time horizons and strategic discipline. Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind. Unable to compete when it comes to calculation, the best workers will come with heart in hand.
David_Brooks  Erik_Brynjolfsson  career_paths  MIT  emotions  empathy  problem_solving  persuasion  Andrew_McAfee  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  focus  long-term  self-discipline  lateral_thinking  sense-making  platforms 
february 2014 by jerryking
How Technology Wrecks the Middle Class - NYTimes.com
August 24, 2013, 2:35 pm 30 Comments
How Technology Wrecks the Middle Class
By DAVID H. AUTOR AND DAVID DORN

In the four years since the Great Recession officially ended, the productivity of American workers — those lucky enough to have jobs — has risen smartly. But the United States still has two million fewer jobs than before the downturn, the unemployment rate is stuck at levels not seen since the early 1990s and the proportion of adults who are working is four percentage points off its peak in 2000…. Have we mechanized and computerized ourselves into obsolescence?... Economists have historically rejected what we call the “lump of labor” fallacy: the supposition that an increase in labor productivity inevitably reduces employment because there is only a finite amount of work to do. While intuitively appealing, this idea is demonstrably false. In 1900, for example, 41 percent of the United States work force was in agriculture. By 2000, that share had fallen to 2 percent, after the Green Revolution transformed crop yields…. Fast-forward to the present. The multi-trillionfold decline in the cost of computing since the 1970s has created enormous incentives for employers to substitute increasingly cheap and capable computers for expensive labor. These rapid advances — which confront us daily as we check in at airports, order books online, pay bills on our banks’ Web sites or consult our smartphones for driving directions — have reawakened fears that workers will be displaced by machinery. Will this time be different?
A starting point for discussion is the observation that although computers are ubiquitous, they cannot do everything. … Logically, computerization has reduced the demand for these jobs, but it has boosted demand for workers who perform “nonroutine” tasks that complement the automated activities. Those tasks happen to lie on opposite ends of the occupational skill distribution.
At one end are so-called abstract tasks that require problem-solving, intuition, persuasion and creativity. These tasks are characteristic of professional, managerial, technical and creative occupations, like law, medicine, science, engineering, advertising and design. People in these jobs typically have high levels of education and analytical capability, and they benefit from computers that facilitate the transmission, organization and processing of information.
On the other end are so-called manual tasks, which require situational adaptability, visual and language recognition, and in-person interaction….. Computerization has therefore fostered a polarization of employment, with job growth concentrated in both the highest- and lowest-paid occupations, while jobs in the middle have declined. Surprisingly, overall employment rates have largely been unaffected in states and cities undergoing this rapid polarization. Rather, as employment in routine jobs has ebbed, employment has risen both in high-wage managerial, professional and technical occupations and in low-wage, in-person service occupations….…workers [can] ride the wave of technological change rather than be swamped by it [by] investing more in their education.…The good news, however, is that middle-education, middle-wage jobs are not slated to disappear completely. While many middle-skill jobs are susceptible to automation, others demand a mixture of tasks that take advantage of human flexibility.…we predict that the middle-skill jobs that survive will combine routine technical tasks with abstract and manual tasks in which workers have a comparative advantage — interpersonal interaction, adaptability and problem-solving….The outlook for workers who haven’t finished college is uncertain, but not devoid of hope. There will be job opportunities in middle-skill jobs, but not in the traditional blue-collar production and white-collar office jobs of the past. Rather, we expect to see growing employment among the ranks of the “new artisans”: licensed practical nurses and medical assistants; teachers, tutors and learning guides at all educational levels; kitchen designers, construction supervisors and skilled tradespeople of every variety; expert repair and support technicians; and the many people who offer personal training and assistance, like physical therapists, personal trainers, coaches and guides. These workers will adeptly combine technical skills with interpersonal interaction, flexibility and adaptability to offer services that are uniquely human.
productivity  middle_class  automation  algorithms  interpersonal_interactions  downward_mobility  hollowing_out  MIT  Erik_Brynjolfsson  Andrew_McAfee  Luddites  problem_solving  job_destruction  job_displacement  barbell_effect  technological_change  blue-collar  white-collar  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts 
august 2013 by jerryking
A tech-powered end to the middle class
Feb. 21 2013 | The Globe and Mail | CHRYSTIA FREELAND.
One way to divide people is into those who think this time is different and those who believe there is never anything new under the sun. That split can be a matter of temperament, of politics or even of religion. But today it is relevant for another, more urgent reason: It describes how people think about the most critical economic problem in the industrialized world – the dearth of well-paying middle-class jobs....
"thanks to the tech revolution, the traditional link between rising productivity and a rising standard of living (i.e. wages) for the middle class has been broken. Gore worries that severed link may be causing the economic slowdown in the developed economies: A weakened middle class lacks the spending power to drive growth.

One of the smartest academics studying this phenomenon is Erik Brynjolfsson, a management professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The co-author of a new book, Race Against the Machine, believes the tech revolution is having a powerful and unprecedented impact. “Most of the debate … is missing the tectonic changes in the way the economy works, which are driven by technology,” he said recently. “This is the big story of our time, and it is going to accelerate over the next 10 years.”

Like Mr. Gore, Mr. Brynjolfsson thinks the canary in the coal mine is the decoupling of gains in productivity and in wages. “Productivity since 2000 has grown faster than in the 1970s, ’80s or ’90s,” he said. “But starting in the late 1990s, we’ve had this decoupling of wages from productivity.” He sees this as a historic watershed, noting that there is “no economic law” that productivity and jobs go together.

That change has tremendous implications. Productivity and innovation, the focus of policy makers and business leaders, no longer guarantee widely shared prosperity. “Digital technologies are different in that they allow people with skills to replicate their talents to serve billions,” Mr. Brynjolfsson noted. “There is really a drastic winner-take-all effect because every industry is becoming like the software industry.”

The danger isn’t structural unemployment (as many feared during the depths of the financial crisis). The problem is what kind of jobs, at what kind of salaries, the tech-powered economy of the future will generate.
Chrystia_Freeland  Albert_Gore  books  Erik_Brynjolfsson  MIT  downward_mobility  seismic_shifts  middle_class  winner-take-all  Al_Gore  Kleiner_Perkins  Luddites  productivity  innovation  hollowing_out  the_Great_Decoupling  economic_stagnation  '90s  This_Time_is_Different 
february 2013 by jerryking
It’s the P.Q. and C.Q. as Much as the I.Q. - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: January 29, 2013

If America is to sustain the kind of public institutions and safety nets that we’re used to, it will require a lot more growth by the private side (not just more taxes), a lot more entrepreneurship, a lot more start-ups and a lot more individual risk-taking — things the president rarely speaks about....Facebook, Twitter, cloud computing, LinkedIn, 4G wireless, ultra-high-speed bandwidth, big data, Skype, system-on-a-chip (SOC) circuits, iPhones, iPods, iPads and cellphone apps, in combination, have taken us from connected to hyperconnected.... the old average is over. Everyone who wants a job now must demonstrate how they can add value better than the new alternatives....Indeed, when the digital revolution gets so cheap, fast, connected and ubiquitous you see this in three ways, Brynjolfsson added: those with more education start to earn much more than those without it, those with the capital to buy and operate machines earn much more than those who can just offer their labor, and those with superstar skills, who can reach global markets, earn much more than those with just slightly less talent....How to adapt? It will require more individual initiative...more of the “right” education than less...develop skills that are complementary to technology rather than ones that can be easily replaced by it... everyone needs to be innovating new products and services to employ the people who are being liberated from routine work by automation and software. The winners won’t just be those with more I.Q. It will also be those with more P.Q. (passion quotient) and C.Q. (curiosity quotient) to leverage all the new digital tools to not just find a job, but to invent one or reinvent one, and to not just learn but to relearn for a lifetime.
career_paths  entrepreneurship  innovation  network_density  risk-taking  Tom_Friedman  Erik_Brynjolfsson  Andrew_McAfee  MIT  curiosity  passions  semiconductors  automation  software  new_products  life_long_learning  Pablo_Picasso  individual_initiative  safety_nets  intrinsically_motivated  winner-take-all  Cambrian_explosion  superstars  cheap  fast  ubiquity 
january 2013 by jerryking
Making Data Visible So You Can Act On It
December 11, 2012 | MIT Sloan Management Review |John Schulz (AT&T), interviewed by Nina Kruschwitz...

At AT&T, John Schulz, a director of sustainability operations, first had to make the company’s energy and water use data visible before the company could establish a program to reduce those numbers....The visibility of that data is what really drives behavior, because it’s shared with their peers, who the facility managers want to do well among, and with upper management. We found the scorecard model to be very useful, both for choosing the right points of data and then for making them visible. That was a real turning point for us.
data  sustainability  water_footprints  leadership  visibility  interviews  AT&T  energy  energy_efficiency  MIT  turning_points 
january 2013 by jerryking
Risky Business: How Data Analytics Can Help
Risky Business: How Data Analytics Can Help

Kathleen Long (Montage Analytics), interviewed by Renee Boucher Ferguson

August 28, 2012
strategy  data  analytics  MIT 
january 2013 by jerryking
All Fired Up in Massachusetts: The State’s New Wave of Big Data Companies
February 23, 2012 | MIT Sloan Management Review |Stephen O’Leary (Aeris Partners LLC), interviewed by David Kiron
Massachusetts  massive_data_sets  interviews  MIT  data_driven  analytics  healthcare 
january 2013 by jerryking
International: Mining the urban data
Nov 21st 2012 | The Economist | Ludwig Siegele: deputy international editor, The Economist from The World In 2013 print edition
cities  urban  data  smartphones  smart_cities  London  Singapore  sensors  mit  SENSEable  exhaust_data  optimization  real-time 
january 2013 by jerryking
Big Data Is Great, but Don’t Forget Intuition
December 29, 2012 | NYTimes.com |By STEVE LOHR.

A major part of managing Big Data projects is asking the right questions: How do you define the problem? What data do you need? Where does it come from? What are the assumptions behind the model that the data is fed into? How is the model different from reality?...recognize the limits and shortcomings of the Big Data technology that they are building. Listening to the data is important, they say, but so is experience and intuition. After all, what is intuition at its best but large amounts of data of all kinds filtered through a human brain rather than a math model?
Andrew_McAfee  asking_the_right_questions  bubbles  conferences  critical_thinking  data_scientists  Erik_Brynjolfsson  failure  hedge_funds  human_brains  intuition  massive_data_sets  MIT  models  problems  problem_awareness  problem_definition  problem_framing  questions  skepticism  Steve_Lohr  Wall_Street 
january 2013 by jerryking
Tech drives nails into coffins of Europe’s weak economies
Nov. 30 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by ERIC REGULY.

Technology is having a devastating effect on employment, which in itself is not new. What is new is that the job destruction everywhere among low-skilled workers seems on the verge of being repeated among white-collar jobs. That is the theory of Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, digital economy specialists at MIT and authors of Race Against the Machine, a book about the digital revolution and how it is reshaping employment and entire economies.

Technology has been displacing jobs since the Industrial Revolution, but the lost jobs were more or less replaced with new jobs
Eric_Reguly  Europe  EU  debt  Erik_Brynjolfsson  technological_change  Andrew_McAfee  digital_economy  MIT  Greece  technology  job_destruction  job_displacement  automation  white-collar  low-skilled  weak_economy 
december 2012 by jerryking
Joseph Goodell Knows the Pitfalls Of Corporate Life - WSJ.com
November 12, 1996 |WSJ| By HAL LANCASTER.

Lesson 3: Develop a plan for building your network of contacts and work on it constantly.

When the outplacement counselor asked Mr. Goodell for a list of business contacts, "I got a blank look on my face," he says. "It was something I had not paid any attention to."

He now keeps a log book, with names and addresses, how he met them, their likes, dislikes, spouses' names, etc. He recommends trade associations, professional groups, school alumni groups and conventions for contact-building and urges managers to "use all reasonable excuses to maintain those contacts," such as lunch, phone calls, notes and Christmas cards.
HBS  MIT  Hal_Lancaster  Managing_Your_Career  lessons_learned  networking  networks 
december 2012 by jerryking
MIT Forged Activist Views, Ties of Central Bankers - WSJ.com
December 11, 2012 | WSJ | By JON HILSENRATH.

MIT Forged Activist Views of Central Bank Role and Cinched Central Bankers' Ties
MIT  economists  Colleges_&_Universities  central_banking  central_banks  Keynesian 
december 2012 by jerryking
M.I.T. Lab Hatches Ideas, and Companies, by the Dozens - NYTimes.com
November 24, 2012 | NYT | By HANNAH SELIGSON.

Dr. Robert Langer, 64, knows how. Since the 1980s, his Langer Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has spun out companies whose products treat cancer, diabetes, heart disease and schizophrenia, among other diseases, and even thicken hair.

The Langer Lab is on the front lines of turning discoveries made in the lab into a range of drugs and drug delivery systems. Without this kind of technology transfer, the thinking goes, scientific discoveries might well sit on the shelf, stifling innovation.

A chemical engineer by training, Dr. Langer has helped start 25 companies and has 811 patents, issued or pending, to his name.
MIT  Colleges_&_Universities  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  start_ups  technology_transfers  scaling  mentoring  biotech  pharmaceutical_industry  innovation  academia  commercialization  accelerators  incubators 
november 2012 by jerryking
"The jobs at the end of the universe."
3 May 2012 |Financial Times |by Douglas Board.

Messrs Brynjolfsson and McAfee suggest that no matter how fast and smart computers become, 6 skills: statistical insight; managing group dynamics; good writing; framing and solving open-ended problems; persuasion; and human nurturing; will always be in demand....three more common quantitative abilities to be valued at senior levels: making the meaning of numbers come alive either visually or in words; a keen sense for when numbers should be an important part of a story yet are missing; and not being bullied by impressive correlations into assuming causality.
Erik_Brynjolfsson  career_paths  MIT  connecting_the_dots  problem_solving  open-ended  persuasion  statistics  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  storytelling  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  Andrew_McAfee  numeracy  insights  sense-making  jobs  uncharted_problems 
may 2012 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Esther Duflo - FT.com
March 17, 2012 1:11 am
Lunch with the FT: Esther Duflo

By John Gapper
randomized  MIT  economists  economic_development  poverty  Esther_Duflo 
march 2012 by jerryking
We’re ripe for a great disruption in higher education - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET WENTE | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Feb. 04, 2012
Colleges_&_Universities  disruption  MIT  distance_education 
february 2012 by jerryking
What Can U.S. Universities Do About a Student Stampede in Johannesburg? - NYTimes.com
January 10, 2012, 12:36 pm
What Can U.S. Universities Do About a Student Stampede in Johannesburg?
By ANDREW C. REVKIN
South_Africa  Colleges_&_Universities  MIT  admissions 
january 2012 by jerryking
The Business of Sports: Here Come the Technocrats
September 16, 2006 | Wall Street Journal |By Russell Adams |
As senior vice president of operations and information, Mr. Morey's first job was to modernize the ticket-sales operation. He tapped a Cambridge company called StratBridge Inc. to install technology allowing the sales team to visually analyze, in real time, who the customers are, where they're sitting and what they're willing to pay for tickets.
sports  analytics  Octothorpe_Software  NBA  basketball  data_driven  Moneyball  MIT  StratBridge 
october 2011 by jerryking
Cellphone Data Track Our Migration Patterns - WSJ.com
JUNE 10, 2008 | WSJ | By ROBERT LEE HOTZ.

Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology are using international data flows of cellphone talk and Internet traffic to capture the complex social dynamics of urban life and globalization. Most recently, the researchers used anonymous real-time data supplied by AT&T Inc. on phone calls, web-browsing and email traffic to and from millions of New Yorkers to chart the city's global social networks. The resulting maps, called the New York Talk Exchange, were recently exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art.
mobile_phones  data  tracking  patterns  migrants  MIT  New_York_City  real-time 
october 2011 by jerryking
The Really Smart Phone - WSJ.com
APRIL 23, 2011 | WSJ | By ROBERT LEE HOTZ.

The Really Smart Phone
Researchers are harvesting a wealth of intimate detail from our cellphone data, uncovering the hidden patterns of our social lives, travels, risk of disease—even our political views.

"We have turned society into a laboratory where behavior can be objectively followed."
mobile  privacy  research  statistics  technology  patterns  data  smartphones  mobile_phones  MIT  online_behaviour  behavioural_targeting 
october 2011 by jerryking
U.S. Intelligence Unit Aims to Build a ‘Data Eye in the Sky’ - NYTimes.com
October 10, 2011 | NYT | By JOHN MARKOFF.

The government is showing interest in the idea. This summer a little-known intelligence agency began seeking ideas from academic social scientists and corporations for ways to automatically scan the Internet in 21 Latin American countries for “big data,” according to a research proposal being circulated by the agency. The three-year experiment, to begin in April, is being financed by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, or Iarpa (pronounced eye-AR-puh), part of the office of the director of national intelligence.

The automated data collection system is to focus on patterns of communication, consumption and movement of populations. It will use publicly accessible data, including Web search queries, blog entries, Internet traffic flow, financial market indicators, traffic webcams and changes in Wikipedia entries.

It is intended to be an entirely automated system, a “data eye in the sky” without human intervention, according to the program proposal. The research would not be limited to political and economic events, but would also explore the ability to predict pandemics and other types of widespread contagion, something that has been pursued independently by civilian researchers and by companies like Google.
massive_data_sets  MIT  security_&_intelligence  Thomas_Malone  data  automation  human_intervention  pandemics  contagions 
october 2011 by jerryking
Does America Need Manufacturing? -
August 24, 2011 | NYTimes.com | By JON GERTNER. Interesting
article about how the U.S. is stumbling its ways towards a tepid,
stealth industrial policy with respect to the making of lithium-ion
batteries to support getting said batteries to be cost-effective enough
for use in electric vehicles.
manufacturers  industrial_policies  batteries  stealth  electric_cars  automotive_industry  MIT  cleantech  start_ups  unemployment  Michigan 
september 2011 by jerryking
The Billion Prices Project and the Value of Data
May 30, 2011. | : The New Yorker | by James Surowiecki. A new
venture called the Billion Prices Project may help change that. The
B.P.P., which was designed by the M.I.T. economists Alberto Cavallo and
Roberto Rigobon, gathers price data not via survey but, rather, by
continuously scouring the Web for prices of online goods around the
world. (In the U.S., it collects more than half a million prices
daily—five times the number that the government looks at.) Using this
information, Cavallo and Rigobon have succeeded in building what amounts
to the first real-time inflation index. The B.P.P. tells us what’s
happening now, not what was happening a month ago.

Read more
http://www.newyorker.com/talk/financial/2011/05/30/110530ta_talk_surowiecki#ixzz1NAObusGP
James_Surowiecki  data  economy  economics  inflation  CPI  statistics  MIT  pricing  digital_economy  massive_data_sets 
may 2011 by jerryking
When There’s No Such Thing as Too Much Information
April 24, 2011 | HeraldTribune| STEVE LOHR. “The biggest
change facing corporations is the explosion of data,” says David
Grossman, a tech analyst at Stifel Nicolaus.“The best business is in
helping customers analyze & manage all that data.”..The productivity
payoff from a new technology comes only when people adopt new
management skills & new ways of working [i.e. marginal improvements]. “It’s never pure technology
that makes the difference,”It’s reorganizing things — how work is done.
And technology does allow new forms of organization.”...Is there real
evidence of a “data payoff” across the corporate world? New research led
by Erik Brynjolfsson, an economist at MIT, suggests that the beginnings
are now visible...Brynjolfsson and colleagues, Lorin Hitt, (Wharton),
& Heekyung Kim, a grad student at M.I.T., studied 179 large
companies. Those that adopted “data-driven decision making” achieved
productivity 5 to 6 % higher than could be explained by other factors,
including how much the companies invested in tech.
Steve_Lohr  information_overload  analytics  data_driven  Erik_Brynjolfsson  Thomas_Davenport  MIT  Northwestern  books  data  massive_data_sets  organizational_design  productivity_payoffs  marginal_improvements 
april 2011 by jerryking
Are You Ready to Reengineer Your Decision Making? - The Magazine -
July 21, 2010 | MIT Sloan Management Review | Thomas H. Davenport, interviewed by Michael S. Hopkins
Thomas_Davenport  MIT  decision_making  analytics  competingonanalytics 
august 2010 by jerryking
The Idea Incubator Goes to Campus
June 25, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By BOB TEDESCHI. M.I.T. is in
the vanguard of a movement involving a handful of universities
nationwide that work closely with investors to ensure that promising
ideas are nurtured and turned into successful start-ups. At first
glance, the centers look like academic versions of business incubators.
But universities are getting involved now at a much earlier stage than
incubators typically do. Rather than offering seed money to businesses
that already have a product and a staff, as incubators usually do, the
universities are harvesting great ideas and then trying to find
investors and businesspeople interested in developing them further and
exploring their commercial viability.

In the jargon of academia, the locations of such matchmaking are known
as “proof-of-concept centers,” and they’re among a number of new
approaches to commercializing university research in more efficient and
purposeful ways — and to preventing good ideas from dying quietly.
Colleges_&_Universities  commercialization  incubators  entrepreneurship  start_ups  MIT 
june 2010 by jerryking
Is MIT Obsolete?
February 3, 2009 | SEEDMAGAZINE.COM |by Neil Gershenfeld

To fill this void, the fab lab network is now inventing new
organizations: a non-profit Fab Foundation to support invention as aid, a
for-profit Fab Fund to provide global capital for local inventors and
global markets for local inventions, and an educational Fab Academy for
distributed advanced technical education.

The Fab Academy is a network rather than a place, with teachers and
students in fab labs around the world linked by broadband video, shared
online information, and common technical capabilities. The heart of
MIT is its intellectual rather than physical infrastructure: a research
culture that creates room for new ideas by emphasizing their evaluation
through rapid reduction to practice, and by mixing short-term
applications (both serious and silly) with long-term research.
mit  obsolescence  Colleges_&_Universities  distance_education  voids 
may 2009 by jerryking
SENSEable City
The real-time city is now real! The increasing deployment of
sensors and hand-held electronics in recent years is allowing a new
approach to the study of the built environment. The way we describe and
understand cities is being radically transformed - alongside the tools
we use to design them and impact on their physical structure. Studying
these changes from a critical point of view and anticipating them is the
goal of the SENSEable City Laboratory, a new research initiative at the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
mit  cities  SENSEable  urban  research  networks  sensors  smart_cities  real-time 
april 2009 by jerryking
SMALL BUSINESS; Learning Entrepreneurship The U.S. Way at M.I.T.
Thursday, March 18, 2004 | The New York Times | By MARCI
ALBOHER NUSBAUM
The Cambridge-M.I.T. Institute, offers three one-year graduate programs
(with three additional ones to begin in October) with the aim to
cultivate Britain's future technology entrepreneurs, create jobs and
spur growth in the British technology sector
entrepreneurship  commercialization  mit  United_Kingdom  Colleges_&_Universities 
march 2009 by jerryking
Understanding Our Blind Spots - WSJ.com
MARCH 23, 2009| The Wall Street Journal| Interview of Andrew Lo
by Michael S. Hopkins, Editor-in-Chief of MIT Sloan Management Review,
and Bruce G. Posner, a contributing editor at MIT SMR. "...there's
something fundamentally wrong with current corporate-governance
structures and the language of corporate management. We just don't have
the proper lexicon to have a meaningful discussion about the kinds of
risks that typical corporations face today, and we need to create a new
field of "risk accounting" to address this gap in GAAP."
opportunities  risk-management  mit  Andrew_Lo  blind_spots  risk-accounting  risks  GAAP 
march 2009 by jerryking

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