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50 Years of Affirmative Action: What Went Right, and What It Got Wrong - The New York Times
By Anemona Hartocollis
March 30, 2019

Columbia and other competitive colleges had already begun changing the racial makeup of their campuses as the civil rights movement gained ground, but the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, and the resulting student strikes and urban uprisings, prompted them to redouble their efforts.

They acted partly out of a moral imperative, but also out of fear that the fabric of society was being torn apart by racial conflict. They took chances on promising black students from poor neighborhoods they had long ignored, in addition to black students groomed by boarding schools......The debate over race in college admissions only intensified. By the late 1970s, colleges began emphasizing the value of diversity on campus over the case for racial reparations.

Today, Harvard and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are facing legal challenges to race-conscious admissions that could reach the Supreme Court. The Trump administration is investigating allegations of discrimination against Asian-American applicants at Harvard and Yale. University officials who lived through the history fear that the gains of the last 50 years could be rolled back.
'60s  admissions  affirmative_action  African-Americans  anniversaries  Colleges_&_Universities  Columbia  diversity  dropouts  Ivy_League  MLK 
march 2019 by jerryking
Stoics in Silicon Valley learn to manage disappointment
17 Dec. 2016 |Financial Times | Byline: Philip Delves Broughton.
* Stoicism is the new Zen, a rediscovered set of ideas that seem tailor-made for a period of rapid change.
* The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials Into Triumph by Ryan Holiday
* Keep moving forward

History will one day tell us more about the meeting this week between Donald Trump and the biggest names in Silicon Valley. We will find out why these usually swagge...
books  disappointment  endurance  Jim_Collins  joyless  MLK  next_play  Philip_Delves_Broughton  rapid_change  Romans  Ryan_Holiday  Silicon_Valley  Stoics  suffering  tough-mindedness  Vietnam_War 
february 2017 by jerryking
A Lesson in Black History - The New York Times
Charles M. Blow FEB. 6, 2017

Let’s be absolutely clear here: Frederick Douglass is a singular, towering figure of American history. The entire legacy of black intellectual thought and civil rights activism flows in some way through Douglass, from W.E.B. DuBois to Booker T. Washington, to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., to President Barack Obama himself.

Douglass was one of the most brilliant thinkers, writers and orators America has ever produced. Furthermore, he harnessed and mastered the media of his day: Writing an acclaimed autobiography, establishing his own newspaper and becoming the most photographed American of the 19th century.
history  Frederick_Douglass  Charles_Blow  legacies  19th_century  African-Americans  MLK 
february 2017 by jerryking
No Racial Barrier Left to Break (Except All of Them) - The New York Times
JAN. 14, 2017 | NYT | By KHALIL GIBRAN MUHAMMAD.

The future is no longer about “firsts.” It is instead about the content of the character of the institutions our new leaders will help us rebuild....The U.S. can’t create a more just nation simply by dressing up institutions in more shades of brown. Now there must be an effort to confront structural racism.....for African-Americans, Obama's travails are proof positive that MLK's contention that the content of one’s character would be the perfect antidote to racism is necessary but--by itself--insufficient to heal the gaping wounds of racial injustice in America.....in a post-assimilation America where there is no racial [occupational] barrier left to break, [African] Americans must turn to confronting structural racism and the values of our institutions....Obama's pedigree and character couldn’t protect/save him from the Tea Party revolution, Republican obstructionism, police brutality, voter suppression and Islamophobia.... individuals, no matter how singular, cannot bend the moral arc of the universe....In a post-assimilation America, recognize that institutions are far more powerful than individuals, no matter how many people of color can be counted in leadership. Structural racism is immune to identity politics....history matters. Black people in charge of, or embedded in, institutions that have not atoned for their history of racism can make it easier for those institutions to ignore or dismiss present-day claims of racial bias. That’s because the path to leadership has often meant accepting institutions as they are, not disrupting them.....people of color can inherit or perpetuate structures of inequality. Many institutions of government, finance and higher education were built on the backs of enslaved African-Americans and remain haunted by that history. Diversity and inclusion policies, therefore, should grow out of truth and reconciliation practices as well as strategic hiring plans. Intentional transformation, even reparations, one government agency, one company, one college at a time moves us past the denial and the empty promises....In post-assimilation America, people of color must continue to pursue leadership roles as the demographics of the nation inexorably change. But they must also reject their personal achievement as the core measure of progress and instead use history as a tool to measure systemic change.
Obama  legacies  institutions  farewells  history  obstructionism  GOP  Tea_Party  MLK  leaders  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  institutional_change  identity_politics  structural_change  African-Americans  Georgetown_University  assimilation  institutional_path_dependency 
january 2017 by jerryking
The Rise and Fall of Black Wall Street
AUG 31, 2016 | The Atlantic | ALEXIA FERNÁNDEZ CAMPBELL.

Richmond was once the epicenter of black finance. What happened there explains the decline of black-owned banks across the country.

On April, 3rd, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech in Memphis. In it, he urged African Americans to put their money in black-owned banks. It wasn’t his most famous line, but the message was clear: “We’ve got to strengthen black institutions. I call upon you to take your money out of the banks downtown and deposit your money in the Tri-State Bank. We want a ‘bank-in’ movement in Memphis … We begin the process of building a greater economic base.”

The next day, King was assassinated, and his hope of harnessing black wealth remains unfulfilled. Before integration, African Americans in cities like Richmond, Chicago, and Atlanta relied on black community banks, which were largely responsible for providing loans and boosting black businesses, churches, and neighborhoods. After desegregation, black wealth started to hemorrhage from these communities: White-owned banks were forced to open their doors to African Americans and the money that once flowed into black banks and back out to black communities ended up on Wall Street and other banks farther away.
MLK  African-Americans  banks  banking  community_banks  institutions  history  Richmond  desegregation  integration  black-owned  self-sufficiency  self-reliance  institution-building  generational_wealth  economic_clout  capital_formation  epicenters  1968 
september 2016 by jerryking
Race, Truth and Our Two Realities - The New York Times
Chris Lebron
THE STONE JULY 11, 2016

The distance between the left and right is represented by ideology and self-interest. While ideology and self-interest have something to do with our differences on racial truth, it crucially has more to do with the moment at which my experience enlivens my perception of how the racial past makes the racial present and how your experience leaves race in the past and renders the present as something unrecognizable to me but comforting to you.
race_relations  Dallas  slavery  police_shootings  MLK  LBJ  civil_rights 
july 2016 by jerryking
Joseph Epstein: What's Missing in Ferguson, Mo. - WSJ
Aug. 12, 2014 | WSJ | By JOSEPH EPSTEIN.

The black family—the absence of fathers—is the problem. The old dead analyses, the pretty panaceas, are paraded. Yet nothing new is up for discussion. Discussion itself is off the table. Except when Bill Cosby, Thomas Sowell or Shelby Steele and a few others have dared to speak about the pathologies at work—and for doing so, these black figures are castigated.

President Obama, as leader of all the people, is not well positioned for the job of leading the black population that finds itself mired in despond. Someone is needed who commands the respect of his or her people, and the admiration of that vast—I would argue preponderate—number of middle-class whites who understand that progress for blacks means progress for the entire country.

The older generation of civil-rights leaders proved its mettle through physical and moral courage. The enemy was plain—rear-guard segregationists of the old South—and the target was clear: wrongful laws that had to be, and were, rescinded. The morality of the matter was all on these leaders' side. In Little Rock, in Montgomery, in Selma and elsewhere, they put their lives on the line. And they won.

The situation today for a civil-rights leader is not so clear, and in many ways more complex. After the victories half a century ago, civil rights may be a misnomer. Economics and politics and above all culture are now at the heart of the problem. Blacks largely, and inexplicably, remain pledged to a political party whose worn-out ideas have done little for them while claiming much. Slipping off the too-comfortable robes of victimhood is essential, as is discouraging everything in ghetto culture that has dead-end marked all over it.
Ferguson  African-Americans  leaders  leadership  Michael_Brown  '60s  '50s  NAACP  MLK  civil_rights  fatherhood  dysfunction  victimhood  thug_code  family_breakdown 
august 2014 by jerryking
Walking While Black in the 'White Gaze' - NYTimes.com
September 1, 2013, 7:00 pm 172 Comments
Walking While Black in the ‘White Gaze’
By GEORGE YANCY
discrimination  philosophy  racial_profiling  African-Americans  Trayvon_Martin  MLK  race  ethnicity 
september 2013 by jerryking
The Model for the March on Washington - WSJ.com
August 27, 2013 | WSJ | By PAUL MORENO

On this 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington, Americans should pause to remember A. Philip Randolph, an unsung father of the struggle for civil-rights. Randolph's "March on Washington Movement" helped make the 1963 march possible. In early 1941, the U.S. was building its defenses for a possible war abroad even as it tried to remain neutral in an escalating conflict. In response, Randolph threatened to have 100,000 African-Americans march on Washington to protest discrimination in the armed services and defense industries. President Franklin D. Roosevelt feared that such a massive display of dissent would show America to be deeply divided.

Randolph, a militant socialist, led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, an all-black labor union whose members helped expand the horizons of a still-largely Southern and rural black populace. He demanded that President Roosevelt integrate the armed forces and prohibit defense contractors from making hiring decisions based on race.
Washington_D.C.  MLK  anniversaries  civil_rights  tributes  protest_movements  A._Philip_Randolph  unions  African-Americans 
september 2013 by jerryking
John McWhorter: A Better Way to Honor Dr. King's Dream - WSJ.com
August 27, 2013 | WSJ| John McWhorter:

John McWhorter: A Better Way to Honor Dr. King's Dream
The goal of the civil-rights movement was opportunity—not a 'post-racial' society.
John_McWhorter  African-Americans  MLK  anniversaries  racism 
september 2013 by jerryking
What Happened to Jobs and Justice? - NYTimes.com
August 27, 2013 | NYT | By WILLIAM P. JONES.

As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the march, however, its central achievements are more imperiled than ever. This summer the Supreme Court upheld the principles behind the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act while severely weakening authority to enforce them. We have a charismatic liberal president and inspiring protest movements dedicated to racial equality and economic justice — but, as in the Kennedy years, they have proved no match for well-organized conservatives.

The solution may not be another march on Washington. But real changes in policy, and the defense of previous victories, require the combination of institutional backing, coalition building and ambitious demands that brought so many people to the National Mall in 1963.
MLK  civil_rights  anniversaries  social_justice  jobs 
august 2013 by jerryking
How Dr. King Shaped My Work in Economics - NYTimes.com
August 27, 2013| NYT | By JOSEPH E. STIGLITZ.

The battle against outright discrimination is, regrettably far from over: 50 years after the march, and 45 years after the passage of the Fair Housing Act, major United States banks, like Wells Fargo, still discriminate on the basis of race, targeting the most vulnerable of our citizens for their predatory lending activities. Discrimination in the job market is pervasive and deep. Research suggests that applicants with African-American sounding names get fewer calls for interviews. Discrimination takes new forms; racial profiling remains rampant in many American cities, including through the stop-and-frisk policies that became standard practice in New York. Our incarceration rate is the world’s highest, although there are signs, finally, that fiscally strapped states are starting to see the folly, if not the inhumanity, of wasting so much human capital through mass incarceration. Almost 40 percent of prisoners are black. This tragedy has been documented powerfully by Michelle Alexander and other legal scholars.
African-Americans  books  economics  economists  fallacies_follies  Fair_Housing_Act  human_capital  incarceration  Joseph_Stiglitz  mass_incarceration  MLK  predatory_practices  racial_discrimination  racial_disparities  social_justice 
august 2013 by jerryking
The Ideas Behind the March
August 26, 2013 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS.

As we commemorate the 1963 civil rights march on Washington, it’s worth remembering how close it came to not happening at all. When A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin started shopping the idea, the Urban League declined to support it, the N.A.A.C.P. refused to commit one way or another, and Martin Luther King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were too busy with other challenges to get engaged. President John Kennedy argued that the march would hurt the chances of passing legislation...It’s also worth remembering that while today we take marches and protests for granted, the tactics of the civil rights movement had deep philosophical and religious roots...They wanted a set of tactics that were at once more aggressive and at the same time deeply rooted in biblical teaching. That meant the tactics had to start with love, not hate; nonviolence, not violence; renunciation, not self-indulgence. “Ours would be one of nonresistance,” Randolph told the Senate Armed Services Committee all the way back in 1948. “We would be willing to absorb the violence, absorb the terrorism, to face the music and to take whatever comes.” ...At the same time this tactic was not passive. It was not just turning the other cheek, loving your enemies or trying to win people over with friendship. Nonviolent coercion was an ironic form of aggression. Nonviolence furnished the movement with a series of tactics that allowed it to remain on permanent offense. ...

The idea was to reduce ugliness in the world by reducing ugliness in yourself. King argued that “unearned suffering is redemptive.” It would uplift people involved in this kind of action. It would impose self-restraint. At their best, the leaders understood that even people in the middle of just causes can be corrupted. They can become self-righteous, knowing their cause is right. They can become smug as they move forward, cruel as they organize into groups, simplistic as they rely on propaganda to mobilize the masses. Their hearts can harden as their enemies become more vicious. The strategy of renunciation and the absorbing of suffering was meant to guard against all that. ...In short, [nonviolence] relied upon a very sophisticated set of paradoxes. It relied on leaders who had done a lot of deep theological and theoretical work before they took up the cause of public action...So that’s what we are commemorating: The “I Have a Dream” speech, of course, but also an exercise in applied theology.
A._Philip_Randolph  African-Americans  anniversaries  Bayard_Rustin  biblical  David_Brooks  civil_rights  commemoration  JFK  MLK  NAACP  nonviolence  paradoxes  protest_movements  self-righteous  self-restraint  speeches  suffering  Washington_D.C. 
august 2013 by jerryking
10% of African-American Households Have Incomes Above $100,000 - WSJ.com
August 24, 2013 | WSJ | By DAVID WESSEL.
50 Years of a Dream
On the anniversary of the March on Washington, how has the outlook for white and black Americans changed?

Attitudes toward race have changed enormously. "It's not respectable today to be a racist. It was perfectly acceptable in 1963," says Eleanor Holmes Norton, one of the behind-the-scenes organizers of the March and now the District of Columbia's representative in Congress.

By nearly every available economic metric, African-Americans are better off today than earlier generations were.

Memories are short, but a few facts underscore just how much has changed in 50 years.

In 1966, the earliest year for which comparable data is available, 42% of African-Americans lived in poverty; in 2011, 28% did.

The income of the median black family, the one in the middle of the statistical middle, is 80% higher, adjusted for inflation, than a comparable family in 1963, the Census Bureau says.

And the ranks of blacks in the top stratum of American society has grown. The number of African-Americans in the U.S. has roughly doubled since 1963; the number with bachelor's degrees has increased 14 fold. As recently as 2000, there were more black men in prison than in college; that is no longer true.
African-Americans  anniversaries  MLK  racial_disparities  households  generational_wealth  census  statistics  income 
august 2013 by jerryking
Organizer of 1963 March on Washington, Rustin, Gets His Due - WSJ.com
August 26, 2013 | WSJ | By MICHAEL M. PHILLIPS
Civil-Rights Leader Rustin Gets His Due 50 Years Later
Organizer of '63 March on Washington Was a Pacifist and Gay Man

WASHINGTON—One of the most momentous passages in American political history began with this mundane bit of advice: Pack peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches. Mayonnaise can go bad in the August heat.

That tip, one of many in instructional handbooks issued by leaders ahead of the 1963 March on Washington, reflected the organizational chops of Bayard Rustin, whose attention to detail helped ensure that what could have been a public-relations disaster for the civil-rights movement instead turned into a model of successful nonviolent protest.

On Wednesday, the country will mark the 50th anniversary of the march and the "I Have a Dream" speech the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. This year, the U.S. also is belatedly recognizing Mr. Rustin, a black activist at a time when blacks were denied basic rights, a pacifist when a nation fighting a world war scorned pacifism and a gay man when being gay meant risking jail and public humiliation.
MLK  African-Americans  Bayard_Rustin  history  anniversaries  civil_rights  pacificism  homosexuality  Washington_D.C.  Quakers  organizational_capacity  detail_oriented  humiliation  bravery  protest_movements 
august 2013 by jerryking
'Heaven was the word for Canada:' race in Martin Luther King's 'North Star' - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 24 2013 | The Globe and Mail | John Ibbitson.

....Racially, the single greatest achievement may have been the decision by the government of Lester B. Pearson in 1967 to introduce the points system for choosing immigrants, sweeping away policies that had kept non-whites out of Canada for generations.

The following half-century of wide-open immigration and entrenched multiculturalism forged Canadian cities so cosmopolitan, diverse and tolerant that they come closer than any to Dr. King’s dream of harmony and equality....

But only for some. Black Canadians make up 2.5 per cent of the population, but fill 9 per cent of the spaces in the country’s prisons, according to the federal Office of the Correctional Investigator. Too many poor non-white neighbourhoods are unstable and, for many of those trapped in them, unsafe
MLK  John_Ibbitson  anniversaries  speeches  Underground_Railroad  geographic_segregation  North_Star  marginalization  1967  Lester_Pearson  African_Canadians  overrepresentation  disproportionality  immigration  multiculturalism  Canadian  cities  cosmopolitan  exclusion 
august 2013 by jerryking
They had a dream: King and Kennedy, 50 years on
Nov 21st 2012 | | The Economist | Jon Fasman from The World In 2013
JFK  MLK  civil_rights 
january 2013 by jerryking
Southern rock's passion and romance is marred by racism and bigotry | Music | The Guardian
Barney Hoskyns
guardian.co.uk, Thursday 5 April 2012

The film, Sweet Home Alabama ,pulls us back to the early 70s peaks of the Allman Brothers Band and Lynyrd Skynyrd, making us reflect anew on what southern rock really meant.

Was Skynyrd's anthem of the same name a song of defiant pride, cocking a snook at Neil Young's Southern Man, or was it something much worse – a strutting defence of old Confederate values, complete with egregious tip of the stetson to segregationist governor George Wallace? Sweet Home Alabama is a stonking song, but Skynyrd's singer Ronnie van Zant wanted it both ways: to be both a bourbon-chugging rock rebel and the Yankee-baiting bigot that Young was decrying.

"Those of us who have characterised [Van Zant] as a misunderstood liberal," wrote Mark Kemp – one of Maycock's interviewees – in his excellent book Dixie Lullaby, "have done so only to placate our own irrational feelings of shame for responding to the passion in his music."

At least the Allman Brothers had an African American – drummer Jai Johnny "Jaimoe" Johanson – in their ranks. Jaimoe had toured with Otis Redding, arguably the key influence on southern rockers from the Allmans to the Black Crowes, and it was Redding's former manager Phil Walden who, in 1969, set up the label most identified with southern rock – Macon, Georgia's Capricorn Records.

"To the young white southerner, black music always appealed more than white pop music," Walden, who died in 2006, told me. "Certainly the Beach Boys' surfing stuff never would have hacked it in the south. It was too white and it just wasn't relevant. The waves weren't too high down here."

Sweet Home Alabama doesn't shirk from the fact that southern rock was born partly of the deepening racial divide that opened up after Martin Luther King's assassination in 1968. "By the end of the decade, a lot of the results of the civil rights era had served to urbanise black music," Walden said in my 1985 interview with him. "A lot of the people we had considered friends were suddenly calling us blue-eyed devils."

The racial cross-pollination of the southern soul era in Alabama hotspot Muscle Shoals (namechecked in Skynyrd's Sweet Home) came to a shuddering halt. Black music got blacker while white southern rock went back to its first principles of melding country music with rhythm'n'blues.

"In a sense the evolution of southern rock was a reactionary attempt to return rock'n'roll to its native soil," suggested the Texan writer Joe Nick Patoski. "After the decline of interest in rockabilly, white rock in the South had taken a back seat to country and western and soul."

Not that anyone anticipated the way southern rock effortlessly flowed into the post-60s counterculture, with the Allmans eventually co-headlining 1973's colossal Watkins Glen festival with the Band and the Grateful Dead. Along with Skynyrd, who were managed by Phil Walden's brother Alan and whose epic Free Bird mourned the death of Duane Allman, a second wave of southern groups – from the Marshall Tucker Band to Black Oak Arkansas – was soon sweeping the US. Some of them even played a modest part in getting peanut-farming Georgia boy Jimmy Carter into the White House.

Carter, of course, was a liberal and 180 degrees from the segregationist politics of Wallace. So indeed were most of the bands that recorded for Capricorn until the label went bust in the late 70s. Yet the supposed "romance" of the south touted by those outfits is hard to separate from the legacy of slavery and racism.

Southern rock has lived on in the very different iterations represented by the Black Crowes, the Georgia Satellites, the Kentucky Headhunters, Kings of Leon, Drive-By Truckers, American Idol contestant Bo Bice, and of course REM (whose Mike Mills reminisces in Sweet Home Alabama about attending Capricorn's annual picnics). The music's ornery fuck-you spirit meanwhile endures in the work of the charming Toby Keith and his kind. Yet the ambiguities of Van Zant's famous lyric are as troubling as ever, despite the apologia for it offered in Maycock's film by self-styled "redneck negress" Kandia Crazy Horse.

White skin, red necks, blue collars, black music: Sweet Home Alabama tells a quintessential American story that never quite ends.

Sweet Home Alabama: The Southern Rock Saga is on BBC4 at 9 pm on Friday 13 April.
'70s  Black_Crowes  films  Lynyrd_Skynyrd  MLK  movies  music  Muscle_Shoals  the_South  country_rock  Southern_rock  bigotry  racism 
september 2012 by jerryking
King and the Jews - WSJ.com
April 30, 2008 | WSJ |By CLARENCE B. JONES.

As Martin wrote in 1967, "Negroes nurture a persistent myth that the Jews of America attained social mobility and status solely because they had money. It is unwise to ignore the error for many reasons. In a negative sense it encourages anti-Semitism and overestimates money as a value. In a positive sense, the full truth reveals a useful lesson.

"Jews progressed because they possessed a tradition of education combined with social and political action. The Jewish family enthroned education and sacrificed to get it. The result was far more than abstract learning. Uniting social action with educational competence, Jews became enormously effective in political life."

To Martin, who believed the pursuit of excellence would trump adversity, Jewish success should, and could, be used as a blueprint and inspiration for blacks' own success rather than as an incitement to bitterness.
African-Americans  MLK  judaism  values  myths  anti-Semitism 
august 2012 by jerryking
They Had More Than a Dream - WSJ.com
January 14, 2004 | WSJ | By STEPHEN PROTHERO.
Jim_Crow  MLK  book_reviews 
april 2012 by jerryking
Surprised by Opportunity - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 14, 2007 | WSJ | By WILLIAM EASTERLY.

Set big goals. Do whatever it takes to reach them. These muscular sentences form the core of commencement addresses, business-advice books, political movements and even the United Nations approach to global poverty. In "Strategic Intuition," a concise and entertaining treatise on human achievement, William Duggan says that such pronouncements are not only banal but wrong.[Duggan is therefore the perfect counterpoint to Jim Collins]

Mr. Duggan, who teaches strategy at Columbia Business School, argues that the commonplace formula has it backward. Instead of setting goals first, he says, it is better to watch for opportunities with large payoffs at low costs and only then set your goals. That is what innovators throughout history have done, as Mr. Duggan shows in a deliriously fast-paced tour of history.
[photo]

Napoleon is Mr. Duggan's canonical example -- his strategic genius was not to storm a pre-fixed position on the battlefield (the traditional approach to military strategy at the time) but to attack any old position that came along where his army was at its strongest and the enemy's at its weakest. Similarly, in the battle for civil rights, Martin Luther King Jr. seized on the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955 to shift the NAACP's strategy away from filing lawsuits and toward organizing nonviolent civil disobedience.
audacity  books  book_reviews  civil_disobedience  counterintuitive  flexibility  goal-setting  goals  hard_goals  innovators  intuition  Jim_Collins  kairos  large_payoffs  MLK  NAACP  Napoleon  observations  offensive_tactics  opportunism  personal_payoffs  strategy  William_Duggan  William_Easterly 
november 2011 by jerryking
When the World Tilted--Again - WSJ.com
JUNE 15, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By EDWARD KOSNER who
reviews 1959: The Year Everything Changed, By Fred Kaplan (Wiley, 322
pages, $27.95). Kaplan, a magazine writer and columnist for Slate,
makes an intriguing case that 1959 was an authentic annus mirabilis. It
was the year that Fidel Castro took power in Cuba, Berry Gordy started
Motown records in Detroit, Allen Ginsberg recited "Howl" at Columbia,
the Pioneer spacecraft blasted off, the dirtiest version of "Lady
Chatterley's Lover" was published, Toyota and Datsun (now Nissan) made
their American debuts and Ford mercy-killed the Edsel, the microchip was
introduced, the first U.S. soldiers were killed in Vietnam, Frank Lloyd
Wright's Guggenheim Museum opened, MLK went to India to study
nonviolence, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg were shown at the
MoMA, and Searle sought approval to sell the first birth-control pill,
Enovid. In sum, a year "when the world as we now know it began to take
form."
annus_mirabilis  book_reviews  '60s  MLK  Fred_Kaplan  Berry_Gordy 
august 2010 by jerryking
The Boss - Deborah Borda - Drawn to the Music - NYTimes.com
April 9, 2010 | New York Times | Deborah Borda, President and
C.E.O., the Los Angeles Philharmonic, AGE 60, HOMETOWN New York, HERO
Martin Luther King Jr., PERSONAL GOAL To climb Mount Kilimanjaro.
CEOs  executive_management  MLK  music_industry  orchestras_&_symphonies 
april 2010 by jerryking
Hillary and MLK - WSJ.com
Op-ed by John McWhorter on the fuss over Hillary Clinton's
remark about President Johnson involvement in, and contributions to, in
the Civil Rights struggles of the 1960s.
African-Americans  clinton  MLK  John_McWhorter  campaigns  Hillary_Clinton  civil_rights  LBJ  '60s 
january 2009 by jerryking
From King to Mugabe - Global View - WSJ.com
Bret Stephens' piece comparing Robert Mugabe to MLK and questions why progressivism sometimes gives way to nihilism.
racism  MLK  race  Bret_Stephens  Zimbabwe  Robert_Mugabe 
january 2009 by jerryking

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