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How to Talk to People, According to Terry Gross
Nov. 17, 2018 | The New York Times | By Jolie Kerr.

(1) “Tell me about yourself,” a.k.a the only icebreaker you’ll ever need.
(2) The secret to being a good conversationalist? Curiosity.
(3) Be funny (if you can). “A good conversationalist is somebody who is fun to talk to,” she said. Ms. Gross, it’s worth noting, is very funny. If you can’t be funny, being mentally organized, reasonably concise and energetic will go a long way in impressing people.
(4) Preparation is key. “It helps to organize your thoughts beforehand by thinking about the things you expect you’ll be asked and then reflecting on how you might answer,” think through where your boundaries are, so that you’re not paralyzed agonizing over whether you’re willing to confide something or not.”

In a job interview, organizing your thoughts by thinking about the things you expect you’ll be asked and reflecting on how you might answer can help you navigate if things start to go badly.
(5) Take control by pivoting to something you want to talk about.
(6) Ms. Gross doesn’t want you to dodge questions. But if you’re going to, here’s how: Say, “I don’t want to answer that,” or, if that’s too blunt, hedge with a statement like, “I’m having a difficult time thinking of a specific answer to that.” Going the martyr route with something like, “I’m afraid by answering that I’m going to hurt somebody’s feelings and I don’t want to do that,” is another option.
(7) Terry pays attention to body language. Be like Terry.
(8) When to push back, and when not to.
body_language  Communicating_&_Connecting  conversations  curiosity  howto  humour  interviews  interview_preparation  job_search  preparation  tips  nonverbal  posture  ice-breakers  concision  Managing_Your_Career  pay_attention 
november 2018 by jerryking
Five ways to cope when you fail to get the top job | Financial Times
Michael Skapinker

If you are one of these thwarted pyramid climbers, how do you cope? Here are five suggestions.

■ Ask yourself how much you really wanted it. No one gets to the top without personal sacrifice.....Possibly your unwillingness to make those sacrifices on the way up is what cost you that final promotion in the first place. Or possibly something else:

■ You just weren’t good enough......Think of how many people did not rise to your level and value what you did achieve.

■ It’s not over until it’s over. ....The new incumbent could quit...

■ Do something else. There is a whole world out there.... start a start-up...join a non-profit..if you have plenty of money....spend time travelling, learning a language or writing a book.
■ There are more important things in life. ....It leaves little time for reading, hobbies, artistic endeavours — all the things you will need for a fulfilling life when the job is over. You can catch up with those pursuits later, but what you cannot recover are the family and friends you neglected on the way. Treat them as you would want to be treated while you are working and they will always be there for you. That promotion you might have got is no match for that.
bouncing_back  CEOs  setbacks  disappointment  Managing_Your_Career  personal_sacrifice  inspiration  seminal_moments  career-defining_moments 
june 2018 by jerryking
Millennials shouldn’t treat their careers like lottery tickets - The Globe and Mail
MARCH 20, 2018 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | by BRAM BELZBERG.

If you're in your early 20s and just starting your career, you probably shouldn't take a job with a start-up.....joining a startup is attractive. They can be exciting, and the pay can be pretty good. A small percentage of people will pick the right opportunity, collect stock options, and become millionaires before they're 30. It's like winning the lottery.

But, like the real lottery, most people don't win, and they end up worse off than they were before....The majority of startups are going to go bust.....Large companies – such as banks and consulting firms and established tech outfits – understand how to bring along new graduates. They've been developing the best way to do so for decades. They have full-time employees who only think about developing young staff into future managers. Their programs work. They teach you important skills, they teach you how the professional world operates, and they teach you how to network. It takes a lot of time, energy, and focus to create these programs.....Generally, successful startups need three things: a great idea, a reliable funding network, and strong leadership. Most startups don't have a full management team, and the managers they do have probably won't have time to mentor you. You also won't be building a network of peers who can help finance your startup one day. If you have a great idea, it will still be there when you've learned how to develop it into a business. If you really want to get the experience of working at a startup, do it when you've developed your career and built a safety net in case it fails....Work hard, put in your time, and achieve your goals. But there aren't any shortcuts in building a career. When you're ready to move on from your first job, you should have a clear idea of what you want to do next, with a foundation of skills and experience in place. You don't want to be left holding only a losing lottery ticket.
millennials  Managing_Your_Career  Jason_Isaacs  career_paths  start_ups  large_companies  advice  new_graduates  high-risk 
march 2018 by jerryking
How to Be a C.E.O., From a Decade’s Worth of Them
T OCT. 27, 2017 | The New York Times | Corner Office By ADAM BRYAN.

It started with a simple idea: What if I sat down with chief executives, and never asked them about their companies?.....not about pivoting, scaling or moving to the cloud, but how they lead their employees, how they hire, and the life advice they give or wish they had received....C.E.O.s offer a rare vantage point for spotting patterns about management, leadership and human behavior....What's the best path to becoming a chief executive? No one path... too many variables, many of them beyond your control, including luck, timing and personal chemistry. Bryan cites three recurring themes.

First, they share a habit of mind that is best described as “applied curiosity.”...They make the most of whatever path they’re on, wringing lessons from all their experiences.
Second, C.E.O.s seem to love a challenge. Discomfort is their comfort zone.
The third theme is how they managed their own careers on their way to the top. They focus on doing their current job well, and that earns them promotions... focus on building a track record of success, and people will keep betting on you.
The Most Important Thing About Leadership, Part I - understand that leadership as a series of paradoxes.
The Most Important Thing About Leadership, Part II - the most important qualities of effective leadership? trustworthiness, “If you want to lead others, you’ve got to have their trust, and you can’t have their trust without integrity,” A close cousin of trustworthiness is how much you respect the people who work for you....“By definition if there’s leadership, it means there are followers, and you’re only as good as the followers,” he said. “I believe the quality of the followers is in direct correlation to the respect you hold them in. It’s not how much they respect you that is most important. It’s actually how much you respect them. It’s everything.”
‘Culture Is Almost Like a Religion’ - “No matter what people say about culture, it’s all tied to who gets promoted, who gets raises and who gets fired,” he said. “You can have your stated culture, but the real culture is defined by compensation, promotions and terminations. Basically, people seeing who succeeds and fails in the company defines culture. The people who succeed become role models for what’s valued in the organization, and that defines culture.”
Men vs. Women (Sigh) - distinctions in leadership style are less about gender and more about factors like whether they are introverts or extroverts, more analytical or creative, and even whether they grew up in a large or small family....the actual work of leadership? It’s the same, regardless of whether a man or a woman is in charge. You have to set a vision, build cultural guardrails, foster a sense of teamwork, and make tough calls. All of that requires balancing the endless paradoxes of leadership, and doing it in a way that inspires trust.
I Have Just One Question for You - If you could ask somebody only one question, and you had to decide on the spot whether to hire them based on their answer, what would it be?.....“So if I ask you, ‘What are the qualities you like least and most in your parents?’ you might bristle at that, or you might be very curious about it, or you’ll just literally open up to me. And obviously if you bristle at that, it’s too vulnerable an environment for you.”
My Favorite Story -..... It’s work ethic,” he said. “You could see the guy had charted a path for himself to make it work with the situation he had. He didn’t ask for any help. He wasn’t victimized by the thing. He just said, ‘That’s my dad’s business, and I work there.’ Confident. Proud.”

Mr. Green added: “You sacrifice and you’re a victim, or you sacrifice because it’s the right thing to do and you have pride in it. Huge difference. Simple thing. Huge difference.”

Best Career and Life Advice - biggest career inflection points, he told me, came from chance meetings, giving rise to his advice: “Play in traffic.”

“It means that if you go push yourself out there and you see people and do things and participate and get involved, something happens,” he said. “Both of my great occasions in life happened by accident simply because I showed up.”“I tell people, just show up, get in the game, go play in traffic,” Mr. Plumeri said. “Something good will come of it, but you’ve got to show up.”....from Ruth Simmons, president of Prairie View A&M University. Her suggestion to students:

“They should never assume that they can predict what experiences will teach them the most about what they value, or about what their life should be,” she said. “You have to be open and alert at every turn to the possibility that you’re about to learn the most important lesson of your life.”
howto  human_behavior  CEOs  career_paths  Managing_Your_Career  curiosity  discomforts  values  hard_work  trustworthiness  paradoxes  pairs  organizational_culture  gender_gap  work_ethic  playing_in_traffic  compensation  rewards  beyond_one's_control  guardrails  inflection_points 
october 2017 by jerryking
How to Jump-Start Your Career - The New York Times
By TIM HERRERAOCT. 1, 2017
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october 2017 by jerryking
Had a Job Interview but No Callback? Here’s What to Do Next Time - The New York Times
By CHRISTOPHER MELEJUNE 1, 2017
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Managing_Your_Career  job_search  silence 
june 2017 by jerryking
The résumé is dead: your next click might determine your next job | Guardian Sustainable Business
16 February 2017 | | The Guardian| Tim Dunlop.

The traditional CV and interview are being abandoned as firms use new forms of data aggregation to find employees. This new field of recruitment, dubbed workforce science, is based on the idea that the data individuals create while doing things online can be harvested and interpreted and to provide a better idea of a person’s suitability than traditional methods.

Whereas in the past employers might have been impressed with the school you went to, practitioners of workforce science are encouraging them to prioritise other criteria. A New York Times article on the topic noted: “Today, every email, instant message, phone call, line of written code and mouse-click leaves a digital signal. These patterns can now be inexpensively collected and mined for insights into how people work and communicate, potentially opening doors to more efficiency and innovation within companies.”

Organisations including Knack and TalentBin are providing companies with information that, they claim, better matches people to jobs. Peter Kazanjy, the chief executive of TalentBin, explained to Business Insider Magazine: “Résumés are actually curious constructs now because, for the most part, work and our work product is fundamentally digital. Sometimes you don’t even need [résumés]. The reality of what somebody is and what they do … is already resident on their hard drive or their Evernote or their box.net account or their Dropbox cloud.”
LinkedIn  résumés  Knack  TalentBin  Managing_Your_Career  job_search  exhaust_data  digitalization  recruitment  workforce_science 
february 2017 by jerryking
Sree Sreenivasan: The Met ousted one of its top executives, so he used Facebook to show them what they lost — Quartz
June 23, 2016 | QUARTZ| Jenni Avins

(1) Build your network before you need it.“You need an incredible support group, and people who understand.” said Sreenivasan. “You have to build it when you don’t need it.” keep your resumé and LinkedIn profile fresh, maintain your professional contacts, and be generous with your time and advice. “Join LinkedIn today, when you don’t need a job,” said Sreenivasan. “Desperation does not work on LinkedIn.”
(2) Go public as soon as you can. Sreenivasan realized that at his level, offers wouldn’t immediately pile up—especially in the summer. So the same day the Met sent a company-wide memo about Sreenivasan’s departure, he went ahead and posted the aforementioned note on Facebook. be open and free. See what happens. Let the universe help.’”
(3) It’s okay to be vulnerable. be willing to be vulnerable,” said Jarvis. “And you have to trust your friends.”
(4) Control the narrative by setting it free. Sharing vulnerability doesn’t necessarily worsen it, Jarvis explained. Quite the contrary: The benefits of sharing—and thereby controlling—one’s own story far outweigh the risks
(5) Be open to meetings and advice. “I’m meeting everybody,” said Sreenivasan. (Indeed, when I asked him if we could take a walk to discuss his strategy on a Monday afternoon, he was booked through the evening; hence our morning commute through the park.) There’s no shame in taking tons of meetings—especially when one’s calendar is suddenly open. You never know which one might lead somewhere.
Sree_Sreenivasan  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  companywide  lessons_learned  digital_media  museums  meetings  networking  vulnerabilities  narratives 
december 2016 by jerryking
Struggling to find work? Try creating your own infomercial - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Oct. 30, 2016

Jim Beqaj,'s book, True Fit. an executive coach and former president of CIBC Wood Gundy, who learned from being the wrong fit in two top executive posts that we need to be less automatic or desperate in taking on jobs and far more discriminating.

Answer four questions, which will form the heart of your infomercial:

(1) What should you pay me for? List the strengths you bring to the job. Not the normal bumph on a résumé--a clear listing of skills.

(2) Who do you work best with? Look through your life and list the people you liked working with – and why. They may have been big-picture thinkers, energetic, boisterous, decisive, or collaborative.

(3) How do I like to resolve conflict? Workplaces can have strikingly different methods for handling conflict and you don’t want to find yourself in the wrong camp.

“Your conflict-resolution style could be, for example, competitive. If you’re in an environment where avoidance and accommodation is the order of the day, you could be seen as a bully, not a team player.

(4) What’s my perfect day? Describe a day or a specific project you worked on in which you were so absorbed in what you were doing it didn’t feel like work.
job_search  JCK  management_consulting  Managing_Your_Career  Harvey_Schachter  conflict_resolution  infomercials  books  fit  strengths  personal_branding 
november 2016 by jerryking
Advice for Data Scientists on Where to Work | Stitch Fix Technology – Multithreaded
It's a good time to be a data scientist. If you have the skills, experience, curiosity and passion, there is a vast and receptive market of companies to choose from. Yet there is much to consider when evaluating a prospective firm as a place to apply your talents. Even veterans may not have had the opportunity to experience different organizations, stages of maturity, cultures, technologies, or domains. We are amalgamating our combined experience here to offer some advice - three things to look for in a company that could make it a great place to work.

Work for a Company that Leverages Data Science for its Strategic Differentiation

Companies employ various means of differentiation in order to gain a competitive advantage in the market. Some differentiate themselves using price, striving to be the low-price leader. Others differentiate by product, providing an offering that is superior in some way. Still others differentiate by their processes - for example providing faster shipping.

A Data Scientist should look for a company that actually uses data science to set themselves apart from the competition. Note that data science may be supportive of lower prices, better products, and faster shipping, however, it is not typically the direct enabler of these differentiators. More commonly, the enablers are other things - economies of scale in the case of lower prices, patents or branding in the case of product, and automation technology in the case of faster shipping. Data science can directly enable a strategic differentiator if the company's core competency depends on its data and analytic capabilities. When this happens, the company becomes supportive to data science instead of the other way around. It's willing to invest in acquiring the top talent, building the necessary infrastructure, pioneering the latest algorithmic and computational techniques, and building incredible engineering products to manifest the data science.

"Good enough" is not a phrase that is uttered in the context of a strategic differentiator. Rather, the company and the data scientist have every incentive to push the envelope, to innovate further, and to take more risks. The company's aspirations are squarely in-line with that of the data scientist's. It's an amazing intersection to be at – a place that gets you excited to wake up to every morning, a place that stretches you, a place that inspires you (and supports you) to be the best in the world at what you do.

Work for a Company with Great Data

In determining what will be a great company to work for, data-science-as-a-strategic-differentiator is a necessary criteria, but it is not sufficient. The company must also have world-class data to work with.

This starts with finding a company that really has data. Spotting the difference between data and aspirations of data can be especially important in evaluating early-stage companies. Ideally you'll find a company that already has enough data to do interesting things. Almost all companies will generate more data as they grow, but if you join a company that already has data your potential for impact and fulfillment will be much higher.

Next look for data that is both interesting and that has explanatory power. One of the most important aspects of your daily life will be the extent to which you find the data you work with compelling. Interesting data should require your creativity to frame problems, test your intuition and push you to develop new algorithms and applications. Explanatory power is just as important - great data enables great applications. There should be enough signal to support data science as a differentiating strength.

Finally, don't fixate on big data. The rising prominence of the data scientist has coincided with the rise of Big Data, but they are not the same thing. Sheer scale does not necessarily make data interesting, nor is it necessarily required. Look for data with high information density rather than high volume, and that supports applications you find interesting or surprising. This enables you to spend most of your mental energy on analysis and framing rather than on efficient data processing.

Work for a Company with Greenfield Opportunities

When evaluating opportunities, find a company that doesn't have it all figured out yet. Nearly all companies that fit the criteria in the sections above will already have some applications in place where the work of data scientists is essential. Look for those companies that have a strong direction and strongly established data science teams, but have an array of problems they are solving for the first time.

Often the most exciting and impactful opportunities for data scientists at a company are not being actively pursued. They probably have not even been conceived of yet. Work somewhere that encourages you to take risks, challenge basic assumptions, and imagine new possibilities.

Observing the relationship between engineering and data science teams is a quick way to determine if an organization adopts this mindset. Is engineering enthusiastic to partner with data science teams to experiment and integrate ideas back into the business? Is there an architecture in place that supports agile integration of new ideas and technologies? In fact, in companies that embody this mindset most effectively, it is likely difficult to locate the boundary between data science and engineering teams.

A greenfield can be intimidating in its lack of structure, but the amount of creativity and freedom available to you as a data scientist is never greater than when you're starting from scratch. The impact of putting something in place where nothing existed previously can be immeasurable. Look for chances to be involved in designing not just the math and science, but also the pipeline, the API, and the tech stack. Not only is creating something new often more challenging and rewarding, but there is no better opportunity for learning and growth than designing something from the ground up.

Incremental improvements have incremental impacts, but embrace the chance to operate on a greenfield. While it is extremely important to constantly iterate and improve on systems that already exist, the Version 1 of something new can fundamentally change the business.

Summary

Of course, there are other considerations: domain, the company's brand, the specific technology in use, the culture, the people, and so forth. All of those are equally important. We call out the three above since they are less frequently talked about, yet fundamental to a data scientist's growth, impact, and happiness. They are also less obvious. We learned these things from experience. At first glance, you would not expect to find these things in a women's apparel company. However, our very different business model places a huge emphasis on data science, enables some of the richest data in the world, and creates space for a whole new suite of innovative software.
career  strategy  via:enochko  economies_of_scale  data_scientists  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  greenfields  data  differentiation  good_enough  information_density  product_pipeline  think_threes 
september 2016 by jerryking
How to approach your own career like an entrepreneur - Fortune
1. Choose growth over profitability. Rather than focus on short-term gains, think long-term goals and what you need to get there.
2. Bet on who you want to work with, not on where. Job seekers should invest in people, not ideas. That means pick the place you’re going to work for the people you’re going to work with. They’re the ones who will train you and lead you to other opportunities when the time comes.
3. Find your special sauce. Fetishize your product-market fit. This may be one of the hardest challenges in the new economy.
4. Celebrate uncertainty. Iterate. Seek feedback and adapt. Pivot where necessary.
5. Be public. Be on Linkedin. Give away hard-won information and knowledge, you’ll get something back. Be more transparent.

Nitin Julka was 31 and working like a dog in Cleveland when he got the itch. For six years he’d been a VP of his family’s business, a $20 million company that sold IT to schools. He had moved home after getting an MBA, excited to grow the company and make a difference in educational technology. It had been a “wild ride,” but he was ready for change. “I had no idea what I wanted to do,” he says. “I just knew I wanted to do something different.”

The jobs that interested him most were in tech. He started calling friends, friends of friends, business school classmates, and even distant contacts to talk about Bay Area companies and about what professional roles he might actually qualify for. After 30 or so conversations, he made up his mind: He wanted to be a product manager at a fast-growing Silicon Valley–based startup.

This struck few as a logical or even feasible next step for Julka: “I was changing job functions, industries, and geographies. People told me you can do one of those things—not all three at once.”

But Julka is more self-aware than most. On a quarterly basis, he conducts a life assessment and reviews what he considers to be his professional competitive advantage. Among his “most unique” attributes he lists his receptiveness to feedback. Indeed, in his quest for continual improvement, he has recorded personal and professional feedback in a single, running Google doc since 2010. He reads it once a week, when prompted by a recurring calendar invite.

And so began what Julka considers the “abnormal part” of his job search: He drew up a spreadsheet of 60 target companies, a few of which he researched for 60 to 80 hours (he admits he “overinvested”). He read 10-Ks and 10-Qs and a hundred CrunchBase articles; he mined his personal and virtual connections; he enlisted a friend, a former Google programmer, to tutor him in code; and he found free online videos from which he learned UX/UI design. With his wife’s support, he gave himself five weeks in Silicon Valley—no mean feat given that he had an 18-month-old baby at home. He met with three or more people a day, prepared a 48-page set of interview notes, and rode the highs and lows of pitching himself for a job that many thought he was an odd fit for.

It ended on a high. In September 2013 he got several job offers—including one, through a contact of his business school professor, at Bizo, a startup that has since been acquired by LinkedIn LNKD .

Julka may sound like a case study in craziness, a modern-day Ben Franklin whose entrepreneurial energy and efforts cannot be easily matched. But while he exists at one extreme, he’s the prototype for what it takes to navigate one’s career these days.

The truth is, wherever you are on the corporate ladder, whatever you do for a living, you’ve got to think like you’re launching a business from the ground up.

As LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha wrote in their zeitgeist-tapping book from 2012, The Start-Up of You, “All humans are entrepreneurs.” To accelerate your career in today’s economy, you’ve got to embrace that spirit and apply the Silicon Valley formula—“adapt to the future” and “invest in yourself”—no matter how comfortable in your job you might be.

Imagine you’re a founder. You’ve been working for days—years, really. (You can’t remember the last time you took a day off.) You’ve networked like crazy. And now, at last, you’ve landed one of those much-coveted meetings with a high-profile venture capital firm on Sand Hill Road.

the start up of you bookIt feels as though you’ve been waiting your whole life for this: You’ve prepared your slide deck, rehearsed your pitch, and honed your talking points. You’re ready to be grilled about even the finest details of your marketing and monetization strategies. You’ve gone so far as to research your VC’s hobbies. But the product you’re selling isn’t some whiz-bang app or the latest and greatest cloud-computing platform; the product is you.

Here’s where your potential backer steps in: What’s your competitive advantage, she asks? The questions come rapid-fire: What’s your addressable market? The opportunities for growth? Your five-year plan? Your 10-year plan?

You may not be used to thinking about your career in such calculating terms, but old standards like “follow your passion” get you only so far. You won’t get Series A funding, but the analogy is apt: If you are the startup, you’d better start answering to your inner VC.

“You’ve got to have a sense of purpose, authenticity, self-awareness, intellectual honesty, and the ability to navigate ambiguity,” says Hemant Taneja, managing director at General Catalyst Partners, a venture capital firm. That’s what he looks for in companies—and people—he invests in. Alan Braverman, an entrepreneur and angel investor who co-heads the Giant Pixel, a tech startup studio, speaks more bluntly: “What most people consider a safe career path, I consider falling behind.”

You don’t have to be a TaskRabbit (or a VC) to know that the world of work has changed. Technology, globalization, and one long recession—in which nearly one in six Americans reported losing a job, according to Princeton economist Henry Farber—have all disrupted old-fashioned employment. Corporations have downsized, outsourced, and rightsized. They slashed training budgets during the recession, and though that spending is coming back—up 15% in 2013, according to a Deloitte survey—corporate talent development is thought to be a dying art. “As companies see it, the incentives are just so perverse,” says Peter Cappelli, a professor of management at Wharton Business School. “Typically you train someone, and once they become useful, they’re hired away from you.” Meanwhile, the slow march of automation continues: Robots now fly planes, perform surgeries, and in some cases write news. That leaves you, dear worker, in a tight spot—whether or not you’ve got your dream job now, you’ve got to stay relevant and evolve.

That’s not as easy as it once was. The half-life of desirable skills has shortened with the hastening pace of technological change. (A Python programmer now eats the once-hot Java programmer for lunch.) Fabio Rosati, CEO of the online freelancing platform Elance-oDesk, says these dynamics are moving us from the era of employment to one of newfangled “employability.” Professionals, like the 9.3 million who find work on his site, are now being viewed as mobile, independent bundles of skills. In this universe the most adaptable talent rules the day. Increasingly, learning agility is an attribute sought in corporate leadership, says Vicki Swisher, a senior director at Korn Ferry, an executive search firm. What’s more, she says, it’s what employers are looking for in all new hires.

That agility is also mission critical for your personal enterprise (formerly known as your career path). Rather than climb a single corporate ladder like the company man of yore, you’re more likely to spend your career scaling a professional jungle gym, maneuvering between projects, jobs, companies, industries, and locales. By the reckoning of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest job-tenure survey, you’ll pivot every 4.6 years (make that three if you’re a millennial, a demographic that will dominate the workforce in 2015). To do this well requires imagination, initiative, and some guts. Much like a startup, you’re forging your way ahead in a dynamic world where there is no conventional path.

“Get comfortable with being uncomfortable,” advises Mike Abbott, a general partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, who knows as an entrepreneur and as someone whose career zigged to Microsoft, Palm, and Twitter before it zagged to venture capital. In his case, he sought discomfort. “That’s how you learn the most.”

While the ideas of a free-agent nation and personal brand building have been with us for a couple of decades, DIY-career building has gotten a big push from the digital (and old-fashioned sharing) infrastructure that fosters this independence. There’s the rise in communal workspaces like WeWork and educational alternatives like Coursera, which offers college courses online, and General Assembly, which trains workers in the most in-demand tech skills. (As Julka’s case shows, YouTube and Google can also be empowering resources.)

A slew of online platforms has made it simpler to drum up employment, from one-off gigs to full-time jobs. Professionals can peddle their services, whether it be supply-chain management or legal advice, more easily and independently too, through sites like Elance-oDesk and TrustedPeer, which sometimes cater to big companies.

The data are messy on the size and shape of this new, more independent workforce. The BLS, whose classification system dates back to 1948, counted 14.4 million self-employed Americans in April 2014. That’s a far cry from the results of a study commissioned this year by the Freelancers Union and Elance-oDesk, which put the number of freelancers—a broader category that includes temps, part-timers, and moonlighters—at 53 million, or one in three American workers. (A report on freelancers … [more]
value_propositions  personal_branding  via:enochko  it's_up_to_me  pitches  self-assessment  self-awareness  Silicon_Valley  gig_economy  start_ups  Managing_Your_Career  Reid_Hoffman  Ben_Casnocha  slight_edge  job_search  discomforts  uncertainty  learning_agility  transparency  customer_growth  self-employment  Elance-oDesk  TrustedPeer  large_companies  non-routine  skills  special_sauce  free-agents  WeWork  product-market_fit  preparation  readiness  torchbearers 
july 2016 by jerryking
Getting past ageism and back to work after a late job loss - The Globe and Mail
CAMILLA CORNELL
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2015

.................networking with your own contacts first. “The people who know you understand your talents and what you’re capable of,” he says. “It’s much better than being just another résumé on a desk, where the manager thinks, ‘Oh my gosh, he has 30 years’ experience. He’s probably deader than a doornail.’”.....don’t rule out employment with smaller companies. “The jobs have greater scope, so they’re interesting,” he says. “And because they have greater scope, those companies need to hire people who are experienced. They can’t hire a young buck because he won’t be able to handle everything that needs to happen in that job.”.......The key message for mature job-seekers, says Mr. Richter: Don’t lose faith. “Keep trying and be secure in the fact that you do have a good track record and a well-developed set of skills,” he says. “You do have something to contribute.”..
aging  retirement  Second_Acts  entrepreneurship  ageism  midlife  Managing_Your_Career  job_search  small_business  networking 
may 2016 by jerryking
The One Question You Should Ask About Every New Job - The New York Times
Adam Grant DEC. 19, 2015

The culture of a workplace — an organization’s values, norms and practices — has a huge impact on our happiness and success.....
But how do you figure out the culture of a company you’ve never worked for? As Nicole tried to evaluate company cultures, she kept asking the Passover question: “How is this organization different from all other organizations?” And, as with Passover, I told Nicole, the answer should come in the form of a story. Ask people to tell you a story about something that happened at their organization but wouldn’t elsewhere....If you’re still unsure where to work, start asking for stories about one practice that says a lot about a culture — a practice that consumes more than half of the time in big organizations. When people find it productive and enjoyable, that’s a good sign.
new_graduates  job_search  storytelling  organizational_culture  Managing_Your_Career  questions  Adam_Grant 
january 2016 by jerryking
What a Year of Job Rejections Taught Me About Pitching Myself
SEPTEMBER 09, 2015 | HBR | Nina Mufleh.
[send to Nick Patel]
After sending out hundreds of copies of my résumé to dozens of companies over the last year, I realized that I was getting nowhere because my approach was wrong....How could a career that ranged from working with royalty to Fortune 500 brands and startups not pique the curiosity of any hiring managers?

As a marketer, I decided to re-frame the challenge. Instead of thinking as a job applicant, I had to think of myself as a product and identify ways to create demand around hiring me. I applied everything I knew about marketing and storytelling to build a campaign that would show Silicon Valley companies the kind of value I would bring to their teams.

The experiment was a report that I created for Airbnb that highlighted the promise and potential of expanding to the Middle East, a market that I am extremely familiar with and until recently they had not focused on. I spent a couple of days gathering data about the tourism industry and the company’s current footprint in the market, and identified strategic opportunities for them there.

I released the report on Twitter and copied Airbnb’s founders and leadership team. Behind the scenes, I also shared it by email with many personal and professional contacts and encouraged them to share it if they thought it was interesting — most did, as did some of the top VCs, entrepreneurs and many peers around the world....What I realize in hindsight is probably one of the most important lessons of my career so far. The project highlighted the qualities I wanted to show to recruiters; more importantly, it also addressed one of the main weaknesses they saw in me....What the report helped me do was show, not tell, my value beyond their doubts. It refocused my perceived weakness into a strength: an international perspective with the promise of understanding and entering new markets. And though none of the roles that I interviewed for in the last two months focused on expansion, by addressing and challenging the weakness, I was able to re-frame the conversation around my strengths....asking yourself a different version of that question is going to make you better prepared for any conversation with a recruiter, a potential client, or even a potential investor....not “What is my weakness?” but rather “What do they perceive as a weakness in my background?”
Airbnb  campaigns  career_paths  creating_demand  Fortune_500  founders  HBR  hindsight  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  Middle_East  networking  personal_branding  pitches  problem_framing  reframing  rejections  self-promotion  social_media  strengths  value_propositions  via:enochko  weaknesses 
september 2015 by jerryking
The greatest piece of career advice you will ever get - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN MCALLISTER, MIKE MARRINER AND NATHAN GEBHARD
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jun. 08, 2015
advice  Managing_Your_Career  new_graduates  passions 
june 2015 by jerryking
What to Learn in College to Stay One Step Ahead of Computers - NYTimes.com
MAY 22, 2015 | NYT | By ROBERT J. SHILLER.

The successful occupations, by this measure, shared certain characteristics: People who practiced them needed complex communication skills and expert knowledge. Such skills included an ability to convey “not just information but a particular interpretation of information.” They said that expert knowledge was broad, deep and practical, allowing the solution of “uncharted problems.”

These attributes may not be as beneficial in the future. But the study certainly suggests that a college education needs to be broad and general, and not defined primarily by the traditional structure of separate departments staffed by professors who want, most of all, to be at the forefront of their own narrow disciplines.....In a separate May 5 statement, Prof. Sean D. Kelly, chairman of the General Education Review Committee, said a Harvard education should give students “an art of living in the world.”

But how should professors do this? Perhaps we should prepare students for entrepreneurial opportunities suggested by our own disciplines. Even departments entirely divorced from business could do this by suggesting enterprises, nonprofits and activities in which students can later use their specialized knowledge....I continue to update the course, thinking about how I can integrate its lessons into an “art of living in the world.” I have tried to enhance my students’ sense that finance should be the art of financing important human activities, of getting people (and robots someday) working together to accomplish things that we really want done.
Robert_Shiller  Yale  Harvard  college-educated  education  students  automation  machine_learning  Colleges_&_Universities  finance  continuing_education  continuous_learning  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  interdisciplinary  curriculum  entrepreneurship  syllabus  interpretation  expertise  uncharted_problems 
may 2015 by jerryking
What Hollywood Can Teach Us About the Future of Work - NYTimes.com
MAY 5, 2015 | NYT |By ADAM DAVIDSON.

the “Hollywood model.” A project is identified; a team is assembled; it works together for precisely as long as is needed to complete the task; then the team disbands. This short-­term, project-­based business structure is an alternative to the corporate model, in which capital is spent up front to build a business, which then hires workers for long-­term, open-­ended jobs that can last for years, even a lifetime. It’s also distinct from the Uber-­style “gig economy,” which is designed to take care of extremely short-­term tasks, manageable by one person, typically in less than a day....With the Hollywood model, ad hoc teams carry out projects that are large and complex, requiring many different people with complementary skills. The Hollywood model is now used to build bridges, design apps or start restaurants. Many cosmetics companies assemble a temporary team of aestheticians and technical experts to develop new products, then hand off the actual production to a factory, which does have long-­term employees...Our economy is in the midst of a grand shift toward the Hollywood model. More of us will see our working lives structured around short-­term, project-­based teams rather than long-­term, open­-ended jobs...the Hollywood model is a surprisingly good system for many workers too, in particular those with highly-sought-­after skills. Ask Hollywood producers, and they’ll confirm that there are only a limited number of proven, reliable craftspeople for any given task. Projects tend to come together quickly, with strict deadlines, so those important workers are in a relatively strong negotiating position. Wages among, say, makeup and hair professionals on shoots are much higher than among their counterparts at high-­end salons. Similarly, set builders make more than carpenters and electricians working on more traditional construction sites....It’s probably not coincidental that the Hollywood model is ascendant at a time when telling stories, broadly speaking, is at the heart of American business.The Hollywood system offers another advantage for workers: Every weekend’s box-­office results provide new information about which skills in their field are valuable. ....The Hollywood model isn’t good news for everybody. It clearly rewards education and cultural fluency, which are not distributed evenly throughout the population.
trends  Hollywood  storytelling  teams  project_management  market_intelligence  automation  Communicating_&_Connecting  Managing_Your_Career  gig_economy  ad_hoc  dissolutions  short-term  on-demand  short-lived 
may 2015 by jerryking
Skills in Flux - NYTimes.com
MARCH 17, 2015| NYT |David Brooks.

As the economy changes, the skills required to thrive in it change, too, and it takes a while before these new skills are defined and acknowledged.

For example, in today’s loosely networked world, people with social courage have amazing value. Everyone goes to conferences and meets people, but some people invite six people to lunch afterward and follow up with four carefully tended friendships forevermore. Then they spend their lives connecting people across networks.

People with social courage are extroverted in issuing invitations but introverted in conversation — willing to listen 70 percent of the time.
David_Brooks  skills  networking  social_courage  Communicating_&_Connecting  conferences  sense-making  indispensable  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  following_up 
march 2015 by jerryking
What not to ask about at a job interview - The Globe and Mail
EILEEN DOOLEY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 03 2015
interviews  Managing_Your_Career  job_search 
february 2015 by jerryking
Shelly Lazarus: A front seat witness to advertising's gender shift - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 29 2015

You started at Ogilvy when David Ogilvy was still around. What was the best advice he ever gave you?

If you attract the right people and you create an environment where they’re as successful as they can possibly be, everything follows from that. ... He judged the output vigorously. He would have divine discontent, we would say. Nothing was ever good enough. If we said, okay, the work could be better, how do we get there? He would go back to either better people, or a better environment where they could do better work. Every answer came back to the quality of the people.
advice  advertising_agencies  Shelly_Lazarus  women  advertising  people_skills  resilience  bouncing_back  dissatisfaction  Managing_Your_Career  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Susan_Krashinsky  David_Ogilvy  Pablo_Picasso  professional_service_firms  the_right_people 
february 2015 by jerryking
6 Things I'd Do If I Got Laid-off By IBM
Jan 26, 2015 | LinkedIn | J.T. O'Donnell

4) Become 100% clear on your specialty. Employers hire the aspirin to their pain. While you might be a diversely skilled, jack-of-all-trades, you can't market yourself that way. Saying you can do everything sounds unfocused and desperate. You need to know what your special problem-solving, pain-relieving expertise is (i.e. your special sauce). Then, you need to market it accordingly.

5) Optimize your sales tools for your business-of-one. Your resume and LinkedIn profile must be set up to showcase your specialty quickly - and with as much impact as possible. Keyword optimization is vital. Knowing what recruiters are looking for when it comes to your skill set and showcasing it in the proper format will dramatically increase the amount of activity you get on your candidacy. [Here's an article to help you understand how little time your resume has to get a recruiter's attention.]

6) Create an interview bucket list. The fastest way to find job opportunities is to build a bucket list of companies you want to work for and network your way into the process. The majority of jobs gotten today are done so via referral. Creating a target list of employers and working a strategy to build relationships with them is the smartest way to land a job with a company you admire and respect. Especially, when you may be competing against lots of other ex-IBM employees for positions. [Here's a step-by-step plan on how to create your own bucket list of employers.]
IBM  layoffs  tips  LinkedIn  bouncing_back  Managing_Your_Career  job_search  painkillers  pain_points  JCK  specialists  special_sauce  résumés  personal_branding  referrals  unfocused 
january 2015 by jerryking
Recruiting has changed – and so should you - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 23 2015

how then, should job seekers manage their social media presence?

The two recommend a tasteful profile that clearly communicates a candidate’s history. A judiciously worded profile, they say, is more likely to get a stamp of approval from recruiters than one than one that goes overboard in listing professional feats and accomplishments.

Once a recruiter can check off the required skills and experience for a job description, that’s when questions of personality and relationship with the hiring organization come into play. It is this crucial attention to the soft skills that differentiates some executive search firms from those merely engaged in their own online search.
Leah_Eichler  recruiting  LinkedIn  executive_search  personal_branding  JCK  Managing_Your_Career 
january 2015 by jerryking
Picking Your Workplace Battles - WSJ
By SUE SHELLENBARGER
Dec. 16, 2014

Many people avoid confrontations, says Dr. Shelley Reciniello, New York, an executive coach and psychologist. But simmering frustrations can come out in other ways, fostering passive-aggressive behavior such as slacking off or backstabbing...It’s important to weigh your ability to control your emotions during a confrontation and to manage any counterfire from your opponent....More than 4 out of 5 corporate employees have conflicts with other employees over priorities, misunderstandings, resources or personality differences...When picking a battle, it is important to be willing to offer a solution or work with others to find one....It’s better to avoid some kinds of battles altogether, such as disputes over someone’s personality or style,
Communicating_&_Connecting  conflicts  confrontations  conversations  Managing_Your_Career  managing_people  managing_up  Sue_Shellenbarger  stressful  passive-aggressive  misunderstandings  workplaces 
december 2014 by jerryking
Eight ways to become the most proactive person you know - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL MOGILL
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Dec. 09 2014

It’s all about you. No one else is going to get you where you want to go – it’s up to you.... Take ownership of your problems, and realize that nobody else is going to solve them for you.

Be solution-focused. ...The most effective way to handle a problem is to focus on finding a solution. Focusing on things that are out of your control is a waste of time, so focus on what you can control with the final outcome.

Be accountable. Set your clearly defined, quantifiable goal and then work backwards from that goal to establish metrics to track and evaluate it.

Use “SMART” goals. S: Specific (Pick something particular instead of using a broad category.) M: Measurable (Choose something you can quantify.) A: Attainable (You should actually be able to reach this, and it may just require the right steps.) R: Realistic (Be honest – it’s probably unrealistic to say you will go from making $10,000 to being a billionaire in one year.)T: Timely (Give each goal a timeframe to create a sense of urgency.)

Make your own luck. Being successful ... is about taking steps every day to be better than you were the day before by moving in a positive, forward trajectory. Make a blueprint and set out milestones for yourself in specific timeframes, or you are not going to hit your goal. Things do not come to fruition just because you really, really want them to happen. You have to make them happen.

Be consistent. Ultimately, success is not about getting everything right. It is about being consistent. Are you consistently and persistently taking steps every day to steadily move toward your goal?

Find the right people. Surrounding yourself with driven, effective people is a proven way to help you succeed.

Honesty is the best policy. Busywork is not effectiveness/progress. At the end of the day, if you don’t hit your goals, you are only doing a disservice to yourself. You cannot get better if you tell yourself, “Oh, it’s okay, I’m fine where I am.” (There has to be a certain element of sustained dissatisfaction).
accountability  affirmations  beyond_one's_control  blueprints  books  busywork  chance  character_traits  consistency  contingency  dissatisfaction  effectiveness  goal-setting  GTD  honesty  indispensable  intrinsically_motivated  It's_up_to_me  JCK  ksfs  luck  Managing_Your_Career  personal_control  proactivity  problem_solving  productivity  rainmaking  restlessness  self-starters  solutions  solution-finders  span_of_control  the_right_people  thinking_backwards 
december 2014 by jerryking
Roger Ferguson of TIAA-CREF: Always Act as if You’re an Owner - NYTimes.com
NOV. 29, 2014 | NYT | Adam Bryant.
Is there a value on your list that is particularly important to you?

One is about personal accountability. One of the phrases I use is that if you owned this company, what would you do? And if your colleagues were owners, what would you want them to do?

What are your best interview questions?

What do you do with your free time? I’m listening for somebody who is a little more balanced. I’m always asking about team experiences, and about resilience and fortitude. How did you recover from setbacks? What did you do? I like to hear stories, and concrete examples.

What career and life advice do you give to graduating college students?

You have to be prepared to take some risks and maybe fail a little bit. Don’t make the same mistake over and over again, but don’t be afraid of making any mistakes. Because your career is like a climbing wall, not a ladder, and you don’t know where it’s going to end up. You have to be a continuous learner as you go up the wall.
money_management  pension_funds  setbacks  CEOs  African-Americans  McKinsey  Managing_Your_Career  advice  new_graduates  values  accountability  interviews  TIAA-CREF  Harvard  owners 
december 2014 by jerryking
Red-Hot Skill: Managing in Gray Areas - WSJ - WSJ
By JOANN S. LUBLIN
Nov. 4, 2014

At a turbulent time in business, more U.S. companies pick and promote executives who thrive amid ambiguity, coaches and recruiters say. These leaders don’t flinch at uncertainty, surprises, conflicting directions, multiple demands—or knotty problems with no clear answers.
Managing_Your_Career  Joann_S._Lublin  uncertainty  red-hot  adversity  surprises  critical_thinking  managing_change  ambiguities  turbulence 
november 2014 by jerryking
Re: Early morning epiphanies
Owen Gordon Today at 8:30 AM
To:Jerry King
First of all, thanks for the pick-me-upper by sharing that particular vocational anecdote from the Agenda first thing in the a.m.:-)

I know that you'r...
Owen_Gordon  JCK  advice  career  Managing_Your_Career  Communicating_&_Connecting  anecdotal 
september 2014 by jerryking
How a bad boss can stunt your career - The Globe and Mail
JARED LINDZON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Aug. 12 2014
Managing_Your_Career  managing_up 
august 2014 by jerryking
Forget the CV, data decide careers - FT.com
July 9, 2014 | FT |By Tim Smedley.

The human touch of job interviews is under threat from technology, writes Tim Smedley, but can new techniques be applied to top-level recruitment?

I no longer look at somebody's CV to determine if we will interview them or not," declares Teri Morse, who oversees the recruitment of 30,000 people each year at Xerox Services. Instead, her team analyses personal data to determine the fate of job candidates.

She is not alone. "Big data" and complex algorithms are increasingly taking decisions out of the hands of individual interviewers - a trend that has far-reaching consequences for job seekers and recruiters alike.

The company whose name has become a synonym for photocopy has turned into one that helps others outsource everyday business processes, from accounting to human resources. It recently teamed up with Evolv, which uses data sets of past behaviour to predict everything from salesmanship to loyalty.

For Xerox this means putting prospective candidates for the company's 55,000 call-centre positions through a screening test that covers a wide range of questions. Evolv then lays separate data it has mined on what causes employees to leave their call-centre jobs over the candidates' responses to predict which of them will stick around and which will further exacerbate the already high churn rate call centres tend to suffer.

The results are surprising. Some are quirky: employees who are members of one or two social networks were found to stay in their job for longer than those who belonged to four or more social networks (Xerox recruitment drives at gaming conventions were subsequently cancelled). Some findings, however, were much more fundamental: prior work experience in a similar role was not found to be a predictor of success.

"It actually opens up doors for people who would never have gotten to interview based on their CV," says Ms Morse. Some managers initially questioned why new recruits were appearing without any prior relevant experience. As time went on, attrition rates in some call centres fell by 20 per cent and managers no longer quibbled. "I don't know why this works," admits Ms Morse, "I just know it works."

Organisations have long held large amounts of data. From financial accounts to staff time sheets, the movement from paper to computer made it easier to understand and analyse. As computing power increased exponentially, so did data storage. The floppy disk of the 1990s could store barely more than one megabyte of data; today a 16 gigabyte USB flash drive costs less than a fiver ($8).

It is simple, then, to see how recruiters arrive at a point where crunching data could replace the human touch of job interviews. Research by NewVantage Partners, the technology consultants, found that 85 per cent of Fortune 1000 executives in 2013 had a big data initiative planned or in progress, with almost half using big data operationally.

HR services provider Ceridian is one of many companies hoping to tap into the potential of big data for employers. "From an HR and recruitment perspective, big data enables you to analyse volumes of data that in the past were hard to access and understand," explains David Woodward, chief product and innovation officer at Ceridian UK.

This includes "applying the data you hold about your employees and how they've performed, to see the causal links between the characteristics of the hire that you took in versus those that stayed with you and became successful employees. Drawing those links can better inform your decisions in the hiring process."

Data sets need not rely on internal data, however. The greatest source of big data is the internet, which is easy for both FTSE 100 and smaller companies to access.

"Social media data now gives us the ability to 'listen' to the business," says Zahir Ladhani, vice-president at IBM Smarter Workforce. "You can look at what customers are saying about your business, what employees are saying, and what you yourself are saying - cull all that data together and you can understand the impact.

"Most recruitment organisations now use social media and job-site data," says Mr Ladhani. "We looked at an organisation which had very specialised, very hard to find skill sets. When we analysed the data of the top performers in that job family, we found out that they all hung out at a very unique, niche social media site. Once we tapped into that database, boom!"

Ceridian, too, has worked with companies to "effectively scan the internet to see what jobs are being posted through the various job boards, in what parts of the country," says Mr Woodward. "If you're looking to open a particular facility in a part of the country, for example, you'll be able to see whether there's already a high demand for particular types of skills."

Experts appear split on whether the specialisation required for executive recruitment lends itself to big data.

"I hire 30,000 call-centre people on an annual basis - we don't hire that many executives," says Ms Morse, adding "there's not enough volume". However Mr Ladhani disagrees, believing that over time the data set an organisation holds on senior management hires would become statistically valid.

As more companies start to analyse their employee data to make hiring decisions, could recruitment finally become more of a science than an art?

"The potential is clearly much greater now than ever before to crunch very large volumes of data and draw conclusions from that which can make better decisions," says Mr Woodward. "The methods and computing power being used in weather forecasting 10 years ago are now available to us all . . . who knows where this may go."

It is a trend worth considering - to get your next job, perfecting your CV could well be less important than having carefully considered the footprint you leave in cyberspace.

Case study Demographic drilling-down helps LV=recast recruitment ads

Kevin Hough, head of recruiting at insurance firm LV=, was a pioneer of big data before he had heard the term.

A year ago, the question of where best to target the firm's recruitment advertising provided an innovative answer. LV= looked up the postcodes at which its current staff lived and organised the findings by the employee's level of seniority, explains Mr Hough. "Using software called Geo-Maps, which works similarly to Google Maps, we could zoom in and out of clusters of our people to see where they are willing to travel from to get to work."

Next, the insurer looked at the locations from which candidates were applying and compared those with the postcodes of current staff. It also looked at the locations and interests of its followers on social media sites, such as Facebook and LinkedIn. The analysis included their interests, stated sexual orientation, ethnicity and gender.

This allowed the firm to create a profile of its typical, successful candidate, also taking into consideration their age and location.

"What was really interesting was the reach some of our advertising was having and, more importantly, some of the gaps," Mr Hough says.

The analysis, which took little investment or expertise, has allowed LV= to redesign its recruitment advertising.

"Sometimes, with all the clever systems that people have in organisations, you can be blinded to the simple, raw data that is there," says Mr Hough.

Next, LV= will add performance review data, taking the analysis to a higher level. He explains that this piece of work will ask who of the group recruited a year before is still there.

"It will help shape not only how we attract people, but will even start to shape some of the roles themselves," he says.

Tim Smedley

By Tim Smedley
massive_data_sets  Xerox  Evolv  analytics  predictive_analytics  hard_to_find  data  data_driven  hiring  Managing_Your_Career  unstructured_data 
july 2014 by jerryking
Innovation: If you can’t make yourself obsolete, someone else will - The Globe and Mail
GUY DIXON
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 26 2014

I think at the root of the problem is a deficit of ambition [i.e. a lack of chutzpah or audacity] The larger the corporation, the safer they become. What I’ve witnessed, certainly between 2008, 2009, is this deficit of ambition.....All of our research points to the fact that companies that do manage and measure innovation outperform those that don’t. You can put resources into place, and that’s where managing it comes in: deploying resources that will support innovative, new ideas; ensuring that you have a strong knowledge architecture – and that it is a formal, systemic thing, so that people access knowledge that is already developed; ensuring access to markets – that’s a structural element. Do your people have access to customers and markets?; and actively managing talent and selecting people and promoting them and ensuring that they have an orientation toward innovation and the development of new ideas....What percentage of turnover or revenue is presented by products that have been introduced in the past number of years? And for different companies, in different industries, that’s going to vary. Companies that are very successful treat that number as sacrosanct for the sales projection for next year and the bottom line for next year....Way too many companies are focused on market share versus the modern metric of, ‘Are we gaining a disproportionate share of opportunity?’ [Is this distinction something to be explored with the help of sensors, location-based services and the LBMA??] And then we’re back to this abandonment thing.
Managing_Your_Career  organizational_culture  innovation  metrics  ambitions  opportunities  market_share  complacency  measurements  talent_management  ideas  obsolescence  disproportionality  latent  hidden  self-obsolescence  large_companies  new_products  Fortune_500  brands  Guy_Dixon  outperformance 
june 2014 by jerryking
If I Were 22: Face It, You're Going to Be Kissing Some Career Frogs
May 19, 2014 | LinkedIn | Sallie Krawcheck.

At this early stage of your career, there’s a real temptation to go into a field of work because your friends are or because it’s “hot.” But there’s also an enormously small likelihood that it will still be hot 10, 20, 30, 40 years from now. So, rather than wedding yourself to an industry, instead shift your focus to gaining experiences and learning as much as you can, so that you build transferrable skills.

For you, Sallie-at-22, that will be in the banking and media industries; in the finance, marketing and sales functions; and in writing and financial analysis. Keep a running note of what works and what doesn’t work for you, what you like and what you don’t like, what you’re good and what you aren’t, the work styles that suit you and what doesn’t, where you passions lie and what leaves you cold. The chance of the stars aligning on these fronts in your first job, or even your first couple of jobs, is very low, so you’ll have to keep searching.

By building up this store of knowledge, you’re going to have what feels like a lightning bolt insight that you should be in equity research at the mature old age of 29.
career_paths  new_graduates  advice  trial_&_error  Managing_Your_Career  Sallie_Krawcheck  equity_research  journaling  reflections 
may 2014 by jerryking
How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 - NYTimes.com
APRIL 19, 2014 | NYT| Thomas L. Friedman.

(1) “The first and most important thing is to be explicit and willful in making the decisions about what you want to get out of this investment in your education.”
(2) make sure that you’re getting out of it not only a broadening of your knowledge but skills that will be valued in today’s workplace. Your college degree is not a proxy anymore for having the skills or traits to do any job.

What are those traits? One is grit, he said. Shuffling through résumés of some of Google’s 100 hires that week, Bock explained: “I was on campus speaking to a student who was a computer science and math double major, who was thinking of shifting to an economics major because the computer science courses were too difficult. I told that student they are much better off being a B student in computer science than an A+ student in English because it signals a rigor in your thinking and a more challenging course load. That student will be one of our interns this summer.”

“What you want to do is say: ‘Here’s the attribute I’m going to demonstrate; here’s the story demonstrating it; here’s how that story demonstrated that attribute.’ ” And here is how it can create value. (Apply this also to cover letters).
howto  job_search  Google  Tom_Friedman  Lazlo_Bock  attributes  cognitive_skills  creativity  liberal_arts  résumés  new_graduates  coverletters  hiring  Managing_Your_Career  talent  grit  interviews  interview_preparation  value_creation  Jason_Isaacs  Asha_Isaacs  Jazmin_Isaacs 
april 2014 by jerryking
What Machines Can’t Do - NYTimes.com
FEB. 3, 2014 | NYT | David Brooks.
here is what robots can't do -- create art, deep meaning, move our souls, help us to understand and thus operate in the world, inspire deeper thought, care for one another, help the environment where we live
========================================================================
We’re clearly heading into an age of brilliant technology.computers are increasingly going to be able to perform important parts of even mostly cognitive jobs, like picking stocks, diagnosing diseases and granting parole.

As this happens, certain mental skills will become less valuable because computers will take over (e.g. memorization)

what human skills will be more valuable? The age of brilliant machines seems to reward a few traits. First, it rewards enthusiasm, people driven to perform extended bouts of concentration, diving into and trying to make sense of these bottomless information oceans. Second, the era seems to reward people with extended time horizons and strategic discipline. Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind. Unable to compete when it comes to calculation, the best workers will come with heart in hand.
David_Brooks  Erik_Brynjolfsson  career_paths  MIT  emotions  empathy  problem_solving  persuasion  Andrew_McAfee  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  focus  long-term  self-discipline  lateral_thinking  sense-making  platforms 
february 2014 by jerryking
Ten ways to position yourself as a thought leader - The Globe and Mail
Jeff Quipp (for Charles Waud & WaudWare)

Contributed to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 13 2013

key tips for professionals and business owners looking to carve out their place as thought leaders:

1. Blog. Wordpress is a popular platform and easy to use. Set up your blog and your editorial calendar (what you’ll blog about/when) at the same time with a commitment to blogging once a week.

2. Create e-books and white papers. This content showcases in-depth knowledge and entices website visitors to subscribe in order to access the information. By offering a valuable piece of content in exchange for their contact information you can continue to share insights and solicit feedback that informs your future content creation. These items are subsequently shared through various social networks thereby growing your profile as an authority. To begin this process, identify the areas for which you have the expertise to create a “how-to” guide. Offer information that is enduring while incorporating timely examples. Once created, the link and a call to action to download the e-book should be placed on every relevant page of your website. Using the contact information that was submitted in order to download the e-book, you can then carry on a dialogue with a captive audience and continue to define yourself as an authority in that space/on that topic.

3. PR and media coverage. Earned media is the signal that what you are doing or saying is newsworthy. Obtaining coverage of new initiatives, launches, and products adds profile and builds your caché in the public eye. Earned media is much more trusted than owned or paid media. It’s worth the investment to outsource this to an expert. You can be a thought leader and still outsource part of the effort to communicate that fact.

4. Speak at conferences (expertise). Every time you put yourself in the role of presenter or panel speaker for conferences you are building your authority as the go-to for those looking to glean new learning and best practices. Especially when the conference speaks to your industry, it takes confidence in your own knowledge and expertise to take on that role. If you establish yourself as being assured of your authority, others will confirm it through word of mouth and insider discussions about those speaker events. Look for opportunities by researching conferences by geography, topic, industry or associations with which you want to connect. When speaking, err on the side of giving people more -- not less -- so they walk away impressed, give good reviews, and buoy your reputation as a desired speaker.

5. Make yourself available through Q & A sites. Whether it’s an online industry forum or LinkedIn, professional chats are an ever-increasing avenue to get your thoughts and opinions seen.

6. Twitter chats. Every day, thousands of Twitter chats take place bringing people from all across the globe together, online, in real time, to discuss topics of interest.

7. Publish news early. Sharing news is vital on social media channels to carve out your space as an authority; it shows you’re on top of what’s happening. But being among the first to do so is key. Anyone can retweet the headline from today’s paper. Share it early and go the extra mile to find and share emerging news from less prevalent sources – keep in mind time differences and get your news from sources that may be ahead.

8. Expert commentary (expertise) on breaking news in your field. The latest launch, merger, acquisition. There are always changes and those are just the facts. What about the impact and the future it bears? Offer your expert commentary to key media as the news happens. Offer thoughtful input and practical tips to address changes or exploit opportunities; this is where your trusted PR experts come in handy. Additionally use these opportunities to fuel a blog and leverage those posts on your website and social media channels where they often get additional pick up. Remember, ***don’t just share the news – add value – say what it means to your current/prospective clients.***

9. Connect with other thought leaders. Comment on blogs or in LinkedIn groups within your industry. It will help get your name out there on topics that current and prospective stakeholders are interested in talking about and your comments will also be found in Google searches of your name. If other thought leaders are talking to you and about you that translates to a level of success by association.

10. Be a mentor. Offer your support to those coming up in the field. Whether it’s in the form of informational interviews, reviewing a proposal and providing feedback, speaking at postsecondary institutions or sitting on program advisory committees. By growing your presence as a source of influence and inspiration others will seek out your advice, input and professional service and spread the word about your authority.
thought_leadership  expertise  personal_branding  Managing_Your_Career  JCK  mentoring  content_creators  creating_valuable_content  public_speaking 
december 2013 by jerryking
Want the job? You need to play the hiring game - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 06 2013,

If you are sending a résumé to a database, without the benefit of a relationship with the hiring manager, you are already at a distinct disadvantage.
Managing_Your_Career  résumés  hiring  job_search  personal_branding  personal_relationships  applicant-tracking_systems  disadvantages 
december 2013 by jerryking
Summary of my D. Sumptom feedback
Summary of my David Sumptom feedback:

q In order for others to promote you, you need to turn your language around to describe who you can help, the type of problems you can solve and how someone m...
feedback  personal_branding  websites  JCK  Managing_Your_Career  templates  advice  Ivey  alumni 
december 2013 by jerryking
Noel's Pitch Letter
steal elements of his note for your own purposes. Look at the way he helps you to recognize a 'Noel-solvable' problem. Look at the succinct way he conveys the unique 'Noel-selling-proposition'. He ma...
Noel_Desautels  Managing_Your_Career  networking  JCK  pitches  feedback  templates  value_propositions 
december 2013 by jerryking
How to Write a Coverletter--How it differs from a Resumé
Brian, I am fine with OK-ing the use of my name here. We have different writing styles, which is to be expected. However, it seems that we have radically different thoughts on the role of a cover l...
JCK  coverletters  first90days  résumés  Managing_Your_Career  feedback  templates 
december 2013 by jerryking
Finding Strength in Humility - NYTimes.com
November 15, 2013 | NYT | By TONY SCHWARTZ

When we identify with a particular strength, the opposite we’re avoiding is almost always negative. For confidence, it’s insecurity or self-doubt. But what happens when we overuse confidence? It turns into arrogance, hubris and even grandiosity. Any strength overused eventually becomes toxic. Excessive honesty becomes cruelty. Tenacity congeals into rigidity. Bias for action can overwhelm thoughtful reflection.

This is where positive opposites serve as a balancing and humanizing role. Humility comes from the Latin word “humilis,” which literally means “low.” It resides just a stone’s throw from “humiliation.” Sure enough, excessive humility eventually softens into obsequiousness and self-subjugation. False humility is even worse: a conscious manipulation covertly aimed at winning praise, often to compensate for unacknowledged feelings of inadequacy.

But genuine humility is a reflection of neither weakness nor insecurity. Instead, it implies a respectful appreciation of the strengths of others, a lack of personal pretension and a more relaxed sense of confidence that doesn’t require external recognition.

In a complex world that so plainly and painfully defies easy answers, humility is also an antidote to overconfidence. It gives leaders permission to accept and acknowledge their limitations, to learn from them and continue to grow and evolve.....I don’t need to say out loud that I value confidence and strength. I do need to demonstrate that I also value humility and vulnerability – to embrace these opposites. In the end, the less time we spend protecting our own value, the more time we can spend creating value in the world.
Managing_Your_Career  humility  opposing_actions  personality_types/traits  character_traits  strengths  contemplation  reflections  pairs  overconfidence  dual-consciousness  self-doubt  arrogance  hubris  grandiosity  confidence  insecurity  honesty  cruelty  tenacity  rigidity  toxic_behaviors 
november 2013 by jerryking
Who's The Best Person To Fast-Track Your Career?
August 30, 2013 | Fast Company | Drake Baer
Mentors act as a sounding board or a shoulder to cry on, offering advice as needed and support and guidance as requested; they expect very little in return. Sponsors, in contrast, are much more vested in their protégés, offering guidance and critical feedback because they believe in them.

Sponsors advocate on their protégés’ behalf, connecting them to important players and assignments. In doing so, they make themselves look good. And precisely because sponsors go out on a limb, they expect stellar performance and loyalty.
Managing_Your_Career  mentoring  sponsorships  movingonup  protégés 
september 2013 by jerryking
What It Takes to Make New College Graduates Employable - NYTimes.com
By ALINA TUGEND
Published: June 28, 2013

When it comes to the skills most needed by employers, job candidates are lacking most in written and oral communication skills, adaptability and managing multiple priorities, and making decisions and problem solving,”
Colleges_&_Universities  Managing_Your_Career  new_graduates  decision_making  college-educated  problem_solving 
june 2013 by jerryking
The Internship - Not the Movie - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: June 8, 2013

Internships are increasingly important today, they explained, because skills are increasingly important in the new economy and because colleges increasingly don’t teach the ones employers are looking for. Experience, rather than a degree, has become an important proxy for skill, they note, and internships give you that experience. So grab one wherever you can, they add, because, even if you’re just serving coffee, it is a way to see how businesses actually work and which skills are prized by employers.... Since so many internships are unpaid these days, added Sedlet, there is a real danger that only “rich kids” can afford them, which will only widen our income gaps. The key, if you get one, he added, is to remember “that companies don’t want generalists to help them think big; they want people who can help them execute” and “add value.”

But what, they were often asked, does “add value” mean? It means, they said, show that you have some creative flair — particularly in design, innovation, entrepreneurship, sales or marketing, skills that can’t be easily replaced by a piece of software, a machine or a cheaper worker in India.
job_search  tips  internships  HireArt  Managing_Your_Career  value_creation  new_graduates  experience  thinking_big  value_added  creativity  imagination  execution  Tom_Friedman  non-routine  in-person  special_sauce 
june 2013 by jerryking
Before the Job Interview, Do Your Homework - NYTimes.com
June 1, 2013 | NYT | By EILENE ZIMMERMAN

“Know the major industry trends and news,” he says, and be able to talk about how they could affect the company.

Find out who runs the company and how they got there. “Look at their profiles on LinkedIn and see if you find a common bond,” says David Lewis, the chief executive of OperationsInc., a human resources outsourcing and consulting firm in Norwalk, Conn. “If you are able to say, ‘I went to the same college as you’ or ‘I also majored in psychology,’ that demonstrates you really did your homework.”

Familiarize yourself with the company’s products or services and look for ways, even small ones, to possibly expand or add value. Note the positives, then talk about opportunities you see, says Moses Lee, C.E.O. of Seelio, a platform that lets students and recent college graduates post samples of their work and search for jobs.
interview_preparation  interviews  Managing_Your_Career  due_diligence 
june 2013 by jerryking
Amazing Career Advice For College Grads From LinkedIn's Billionaire Founder - Business Insider
1. Competition.
What should I do with my Life? is the WRONG question--it's too self-absorbed. Instead, make it about everyone else, which means isolating your competitive advantage (assets, aspirations, market realities). In terms of making a positive difference in the world, ask "how can I help?"
2. Networks
Proactively build your network.Relationships matter as people control access to resources, opportunities and information. It's likely that someone I already know knows someone who could help me.
3. Risk
Actions, not plans generate useful lessons. Playing it safe is one of the riskiest things you can do--learn to take Intelligent Risks. Prioritize plans that offer the best chance at learning about yourself and the world. If the worst case scenario is losing a bit of time or money or experiencing some discomfort, this is a worthwhile risk. if the worst case scenario is the serious tarnishing of one's reputation, loss of all economic assets, or something otherwise career ending, don't accept that risk. The best opportunities can be the one with the most question marks.
advice  Managing_Your_Career  Reid_Hoffman  LinkedIn  career_ending_moves  entrepreneurship  indispensable  serving_others  Colleges_&_Universities  students  new_graduates  job_search  discomforts  action-oriented  self-absorbed  playing_it_safe 
may 2013 by jerryking
How to Brand a "Useless" Degree
May 8, 2013 | Harvard Business Review |by Dorie Clark

emphasize your skills, not your content expertise.
position yourself as a potential fount of innovation.
cite your work experience.
make meaningful connections with the people around me.
personal_branding  Managing_Your_Career  job_search  HBR  skills  liberal_arts  humanities 
may 2013 by jerryking
How Not to Be the Office Tech Dinosaur - WSJ.com
April 16, 2013 | WSJ | By SUE SHELLENBARGER

Don't Be the Office Tech Dinosaur
As Younger Colleagues Speak Fluent Twitter, How Old Pros Find Ways to Upgrade Their Skills, Fight Insecurity
aging  Managing_Your_Career  advertising_agencies  Sue_Shellenbarger 
april 2013 by jerryking
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