recentpopularlog in

jerryking : mark_zuckerberg   16

Zucked by Roger McNamee — anti-social network
January 4, 2019 | Financial Times | Hannah Kuchler.

n Zucked, McNamee describes his evolution into one of the loudest voices calling for regulation of Facebook, after a lifetime as a “technology optimist” and a capitalist convinced markets could settle their own problems. The 62-year-old is part of the old guard of Silicon Valley, investing in companies including Electronic Arts, the video game company, and Palm, the maker of the early handheld devices. But he rebelled against the Valley’s code of silence, to become a key leader in a campaign against Facebook.

His book is the first narrative tale of Facebook’s unravelling over the past two years. McNamee tells the inside story of the campaign in which he allied with former Google design ethicist Tristan Harris and lobbied the politicians who eventually called Zuckerberg to testify in front of Congress in April 2018.

Without McNamee and Harris, would Washington have woken up to the severity of the social network’s problems — or believed they could do anything about it? Zucked lands just as the Democrats take over the House of Representatives, making US regulation more likely — although nowhere near inevitable.
books  book_review  Facebook  Mark_Zuckerberg  regulations  Roger_McNamee  Silicon_Valley 
february 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Lean Out - The New York Times
By Kara Swisher
Ms. Swisher covers technology and is a contributing opinion writer.

Nov. 24, 2018
Facebook  Google  Kara_Swisher  Mark_Zuckerberg  Sheryl_Sandberg  Silicon_Valley  women 
november 2018 by jerryking
The Shkreli Syndrome: Youthful Trouble, Tech Success, Then a Fall
SEPT. 14, 2017 | The New York Times | By NOAM SCHEIBER.

Entrepreneurs, it turns out, do not just move fast and break things, as Facebook’s longtime credo put it. They are also more likely than others to cross the line.

According to research by the economists Ross Levine and Yona Rubinstein, people who become entrepreneurs are not only apt to have had high self-esteem while growing up (and to have been white, male and financially secure). They are also more likely than others to have been intelligent people who engaged in illicit activities in their teenage years and early 20s.

And those indiscretions have not been limited to using drugs or skipping school, but have included antisocial acts like taking property by force or stealing goods worth less than $50...... the question is whether youthful rule-breaking might have foreshadowed not only their rise, but also their fall........It is perhaps not surprising that longtime rebels like Mr. Kalanick — who has boasted of being among the first peer-to-peer file-sharing “pirates” when he was in his early 20s — would be inclined toward entrepreneurship. It is a calling that, in the often repeated narrative of the economist Joseph Schumpeter, rewards those who upend the established order......a phenomenon known as “moral disengagement,” in which people rationalize behavior at odds with their own principles. A teenager who steals a pair of sneakers, for example, may tell himself that the manufacturer was overcharging consumers.

Studies have shown that such moral disengagement frequently enables wrongdoing, and that it can survive into adulthood. According to Professor Steinberg, entrepreneurs who are prone to moral disengagement may continue to break actual rules, not just metaphorical ones......These days, many venture capitalists spend as much time assessing what kind of troublemaker an entrepreneur may be as they do assessing a business’s revolutionary potential.

“We do want them to be rule-breakers,” said David Golden, who helps run the venture capital arm of Revolution, the investment firm of the AOL co-founder Steve Case. “We don’t want them to be felons.”
Mark_Zuckerberg  entrepreneurship  founders  piracy  Travis_Kalanick  rogue_actors  rule_breaking  Steve_Case  unconventional_thinking  Joseph_Schumpeter  ethics  troublemakers 
september 2017 by jerryking
Nice Speech, Mark Zuckerberg! You’re Still a Few Credits Short - WSJ
By Deepa Seetharaman and Sarah E. Needleman
May 26, 2017

Mr. Zuckerberg opened his afternoon commencement speech with a few jokes and then urged graduates to “create a world where every single person has a sense of purpose” at a time when jobs are declining due to automation and social safety nets are wearing thin.

Today’s great struggle, he said, is between the “forces of freedom, openness and global community against the forces of authoritarianism, isolationism and nationalism.”
Mark_Zuckerberg  Harvard  Commencement  speeches  Colleges_&_Universities  dropouts  new_graduates 
may 2017 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria: ‘We are meant to be engaged with the big questions’ - The Globe and Mail
RUDYARD GRIFFITHS
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 17 2015

Q: How is your defence of a liberal-arts education more than nostalgia for a bygone era of higher learning, now out of sync with today’s hyper-competitive, skills-based economies?

...what’s happening in advanced manufacturing. In almost every industry, basic production is getting commoditized. It’s becoming routine and simple, and most everything we consume, to put it bluntly, can be made by a machine or a factory worker. You can manufacture a $30 sneaker anywhere in the world but, to sell it for $300, there has to be a story around it, there has to be beautiful design, there has to be interesting marketing; you have to understand social media....because product[s]stand out only if you understand how human beings use technology....Mark Zuckerberg says that Facebook is more about psychology and sociology, two liberal arts, than technology...a liberal education provides you with a rounded education in every sense of the word. It teaches you how to write, which I think is the most important aspect, because you learn how to think. It teaches you how to learn. These are soft skills but they’re not lesser skills.
liberal_arts  humanities  Fareed_Zakaria  Rudyard_Griffiths  social_media  Mark_Zuckerberg  education  civics  psychology  sociology  soft_skills  thinking  design  product_design  Daniel_Pink  UX 
april 2015 by jerryking
Why Modern Innovation Traffics in Trifles
July 6, 2012| WSJ | By NICHOLAS CARR.
Why Our Innovators Traffic in Trifles
An app for making vintage photos isn't exactly a moonshot. Are we too obsessed with 'tools of the self'?

What's behind innovation's turn toward the trifling? Declinists point to several possible culprits: America's schools are broken, investors and executives have become shortsighted, taxes are too high (sapping the entrepreneurial spirit), taxes are too low (preventing the government from funding basic research). Or maybe America has just lost its mojo.

But none of these explanations is particularly compelling. In all sorts of ways, the conditions for ingenuity and enterprise have never been better, and more patents were granted last year than ever before in American history. In the past few years, companies have decoded the human genome, shrunk multipurpose computers to the size of sardine tins and built cars that can drive themselves. The Internet itself, a global computer network of mind-blowing speed, size and utility, testifies to the ability of today's engineers to perform miracles....... What we are seeing is not a slowdown in the pace of innovation but a shift in its focus. Americans are as creative as ever, but today's buzz and big-money speculation are devoted to smaller-scale, less far-reaching, less conspicuous advances. We are getting precisely the kind of innovation that we desire—and deserve..........Knowing that the cause of our innovators' faltering ambitions lies in our own nature does not make it any less of a concern. But it does suggest that, if we want to see a resurgence in big thinking and grand invention, if we want to promote breakthroughs that will improve not only our own lives but those of our grandchildren, we need to enlarge our aspirations. We need to look outward again. If our own dreams are small and self-centered, we can hardly blame inventors for producing trifles.
America_in_Decline?  breakthroughs  Facebook  incrementalism  ingenuity  innovation  Instagram  Mark_Zuckerberg  moonshots  Nicholas_Carr  short-sightedness  thinking_big 
july 2012 by jerryking
It makes no sense to copy Mark Zuckerberg
Jul 27, 2011 | FT. pg. 10 | Luke Johnson. I used to think Mark
Z's achievement with Facebook was an inspiration to entrepreneurs. Now
I'm not so sure....I've lost count of the # of biz plans I've seen from
"digital pioneers" building the next Facebook or suchlike...The truth
is that no other company has ever expanded like Facebook. The vast
majority of start-ups do not raise formal vc - they fund their
operations via family & friends...Most winners are in their 30s or
40s by the time they make it. Experience counts in mgmt....This illusion
of instant technology wealth is new. Thomas Edison & other
inventors took yrs. to establish fortunes - and many like Charles
Goodyear, never did..... Google & Amazon distorted the financial
world... they were the exceptions....Companies generally take from 5 to
10 yrs. to break through....The best biz are not built to flip...Most
service mundane requirements, quite possibly business apps rather than
sexy consumer projects like Facebook.
Mark_Zuckerberg  Luke_Johnson  ProQuest  entrepreneurship  start_ups  facebook  unglamorous 
august 2011 by jerryking
Larry Summers Says "Tiger Mom" Amy Chua May Be Wrong - Davos Live - WSJ
January 27, 2011 By Jon Hilsenrath

His own children would be shocked to hear it, Mr. Summers said, but maybe Ms. Chua is wrong.

“In a world where things that require discipline and steadiness can be done increasingly by computers, is the traditional educational emphasis on discipline, accuracy and successful performance and regularity really what we want?” he asked. Creativity, he said, might be an even more valuable asset that educators and parents should emphasize. At Harvard, he quipped, the A students tend to become professors and the C students become wealthy donors.

“It is not entirely clear that your veneration of traditional academic achievement is exactly well placed,” he said to Ms. Chua. “Which two freshmen at Harvard have arguably been most transformative of the world in the last 25 years?” he asked. “You can make a reasonable case for Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg, neither of whom graduated.” Demanding tiger moms, he said, might not be very supportive of their kids dropping out of school.
Amy_Chua  billgates  WEF_Davos  education  Harvard  Larry_Summers  Mark_Zuckerberg  parenting  Tiger_Moms  commoditization_of_information  creativity  academic_achievement 
january 2011 by jerryking
Gordon Crovitz: The More Exciting Story of Facebook - WSJ.com
* OCTOBER 11, 2010

The More Exciting Story of Facebook
'The Social Network' misses that innovation arises from hunches and serendipity, not lawsuits.

*
By L. GORDON CROVIT
Facebook  Mark_Zuckerberg  L._Gordon_Crovtiz 
october 2010 by jerryking
Sorkin vs. Zuckerberg
October 1, 2010 | TNR | by Lawrence Lessig. `What’s important
is that Zuckerberg’s genius could be embraced by half-a-billion people
within 6 yrs. of its first being launched, without (and here is the
critical bit) asking permission of anyone. The real story is not the
invention. It is the platform that makes the invention sing. Zuckerberg
didn’t invent that platform. He was a hacker who built for it. And as
much as Zuckerberg deserves respect for his success, the real hero in
this story doesn’t get a credit. It’s something Sorkin doesn’t
notice....Because the platform of the Internet is open & free
(“neutral network,”) a billion Mark Zuckerbergs have the opportunity to
invent for it. Plus, the cost of proving viability on this platform has
dropped dramatically. You don’t even have to possess Zuckerberg’s
technical genius to develop your own idea for the Internet today.
Websites across the developing world deliver high quality coding to
complement the very best ideas from anywhere.
Lawrence_Lessig  Mark_Zuckerberg  Facebook  movies  films  innovation  The_Social_Network 
october 2010 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read