recentpopularlog in

jerryking : mcdonald's   39

Cashew foie gras? Big Food jumps on ‘plant-based’ bandwagon
MAY 18, 2019 | Financial Times | by Leila Abboud in Paris and Emiko Terazono in London

* Boom in meat and dairy substitutes sets up ‘battle for the centre of the plate’
* Nestlé recently launched the Garden Gourmet's Incredible burger in Europe and plans to launch it in the US in the autumn in conjunction with McDonald’s.
* Burger King has partnered with a “foodtech” start-up to put meat-free burgers on their menu.
* Pret A Manger is considering a surge in its roll-out of vegetarian outlets as it looks into buying UK sandwich rival Eat.

A change is afoot that is set to sweep through the global food industry as once-niche dietary movements (i.e. vegetarians, then the vegans, followed by a bewildering array of food tribes from veggievores, flexitarians and meat reducers to pescatarians and lacto-vegetarians ) join the mainstream.

At the other end of the supply chain, Big Food is getting in on the act as the emergence of plant-based substitutes opens the door for meat market disruption. Potentially a huge opportunity if the imitation meat matches adoption levels of milk product alternatives such as soy yoghurt and almond milk, which account for 13% of the American dairy market. It is a $35bn opportunity in the US alone, according to newly listed producer Beyond Meat, given the country’s $270bn market for animal-based food. 

Packaged food producers, burdened with anaemic growth in segments from drinks to sweets, have jumped on the plant-based bandwagon. Market leaders including Danone, Nestlé and Unilever are investing heavily in acquisitions and internal product development.

Laggards are dipping their toes. Kraft-Heinz, for example, is investing in start-ups via its corporate venture capital arm and making vegan variants of some of its products. Even traditional meat producers, such as US-based Tyson Foods and Canada’s Maple Leaf Foods, are diversifying into plant-based offerings to remain relevant with consumers.......“Plant-based is not a threat,” said Wayne England, who leads Nestlé’s food strategy. “On the contrary, it’s a great opportunity for us. Many of our existing brands can play much more in this space than they do today, so we’re accelerating that shift, and there is also space for new brands.” .....a plethora of alternative protein products are hitting supermarket shelves... appealing to consumers for different reasons....(1) reducing meat consumption for health reasons... (2) others concerned about animal welfare...(3) concern over agriculture’s contribution to climate change......As Big Food rushes in, it faces stiff competition from a new breed of start-ups that have raced ahead to launch plant-based meats they claim look, taste and feel like the real thing. Flush with venture capital funding, they have turned to technology, analysing the molecular structure of foods and seeking to reverse-engineer versions using plant proteins......Not only are the disrupters innovating on the product side, they are rapidly creating new brands using digital marketing and partnerships with restaurants. Big food companies, which can struggle to create new brands, often rely on acquisitions to bring new ones onboard.....Aside from the quality of the new protein substitutes, how they are marketed will determine whether they become truly mass-market or remain limited to the margins of motivated vegetarians and vegans. The positioning of the product in stores influences sales, with new brands such as Beyond Meat pushing to be placed in the meat section rather than separate chilled cabinets alongside the vegetarian and vegan options.....Elio Leoni Sceti, whose investment company recently backed NotCo, a Chile-based start-up that uses machine learning to create vegetarian replicas of meat and dairy, believes new brands have an edge on the marketing side because they are not held back by old habits. 

“The new consumer looks at the consequences of consumption and believes that health and beauty come from within,” said one industry veteran who used to run Birds Eye owner Iglo. “They’re less convinced by the functional-based arguments that food companies are used to making, like less sugar or fewer calories. This is not the way that consumers used to make decisions so the old guard are flummoxed.”...Dan Curtin, who heads Greenleaf, the Maple Leaf Food's plant-based business, played down the idea that alternative meats will eat into meat sales, saying the substitutes were “additive”. “We don’t see this as a replacement. People want options,” he said. 

 
animal-based  Beyond_Meat  Big_Food  brands  Burger_King  Danone  digital_strategies  food_tech  hamburgers  Impossible_Foods  Kraft_Heinz  laggards  Maple_Leaf_Foods  McDonald's  Nestlé  plant-based  rollouts  start_ups  Unilever  vegetarian  vc  venture_capital  CPG  diets  meat  new_products  shifting_tastes  tribes 
may 2019 by jerryking
Fast-Food Chains, Upscale Restaurants Want to Bring You Lunch - WSJ
By Julie Jargon
Updated June 1, 2017

Restaurants are no longer treating lunchtime delivery as an afterthought.

With online-ordering apps proliferating and many customers cutting down on eating out for lunch, the industry—from fast-food chains to upscale restaurateurs—is looking for ways to bring food to patrons without compromising their eating experience.......“Restaurant delivery is a $100 billion dollar market, and it’s exploding,” ......But enticing customers to order in at lunch, which has been a tough spot for burger chains in particular, remains difficult. McDonald’s Chief Executive Steve Easterbrook told investors on Wednesday that 60% of the chain’s delivery orders come in the evening and late at night. Getting burger delivery right—keeping the patty warm and juicy, while preventing toppings from getting the bun soggy—is notoriously tricky.....Even upscale restaurants are joining the delivery bandwagon. Some are so confident they are even eschewing tables and chairs.......Delivery only accounts for 3% of restaurant purchases nationwide, but it is growing fast. Non-pizza delivery purchases have risen by 30% in the past four years, according to market-research firm NPD Group Inc.....The exponential growth of delivery comes with a new set of challenges. Some restaurants are struggling to figure out how to properly staff their kitchens to handle both in-store demand and delivery orders......Working with third-party delivery services is an expensive proposition, because many of them charge restaurants a hefty fee—usually a share of order sales ranging from 17% to 30%—to participate and the restaurants lose out on high-margin sales like alcohol and soft drinks that people tend to order when they are eating on the premises.......delivery is the future: “As driverless cars and drones become the norm I think we’ll all be emailing Amazon and getting a drone delivering a sandwich.”
restaurants  fast-food  fast-casual  Uber  UberEats  McDonald's  upscale  lunchtime  delivery_services  in-store 
june 2017 by jerryking
McDonald’s is going to play SXSW this year — Quartz
Svati Kirsten Narula
March 03, 2015

McDonald’s will host three “pitch sessions” at SXSW on March 13, offering an audience for tech startups with ideas for innovation in three categories:
Reinventing the Restaurant Experience: “This is not about tweeting, ordering online or Wi-Fi connectivity…. We are talking about multiple screens, proximity technology, personalization and even smart packaging.”
Content Creation: “Brands have to co-create content with communities, curate daily content to stay relevant, and create content with social in mind. How can brands tap into new content partners and models that can tackle these objectives?”
Transportation and Delivery: “Our existing idea of door-to-door delivery and drive-thru will soon be obsolete. Imagine a world where drones could deliver you food while you’re driving down the highway.”
The best pitch will earn the presenter a trip to McDonald’s corporate headquarters, where he or she will be invited to pitch directly to the company’s C-suite. McDonald’s says pitches will be evaluated based on “current traction and milestones,” “market potential,” “customer value proposition and service offering,” and “overall brand fit.”
brands  CAMEX  co-creation  McDonald's  SXSW  digital_strategies  sponsorships  millennials  Fortune_500  creating_valuable_content  content_creators  metrics  proximity  personalization  home-delivery  drones  Michael_McDerment  pitches  C-suite 
march 2017 by jerryking
McDonald’s Decides to Embrace Fast-Food Identity - WSJ
By JULIE JARGON
Updated March 1, 2017

McDonald’s was losing customers to other fast-food chains, not to fast-casual restaurants serving healthier fare.

“We don’t need to be a different McDonald’s, but a better McDonald’s,” Lucy Brady, McDonald’s senior vice president of corporate strategy and business development, told investors Wednesday gathered in a warehouse near its new headquarters in downtown Chicago.

Critics have long been urging the chain to focus on its core customers, but McDonald’s had added more salads, snack wraps and oatmeal to its menu to attract health-conscious customers. In recent months the chain pulled many of those slow-selling products. It also had experimented with higher-priced burgers that failed.

Chasing new customers is a pitfall that’s hurt other fast-food restaurants.
McDonald's  fast-food 
march 2017 by jerryking
Why McDonald’s All-Day Breakfast Was Years in the Making - Eater
by Tove Danovich Sep 25, 2015,

Most customers pay little attention to how the McGriddle is made, so to speak, but setting up a program like the all-day breakfast takes more than just marketing. In addition to years of talking about putting this plan into action, stores across the country spent months testing all-day breakfast and straightening out any flaws. Even once a plan was implemented, it was up to more than 3,000 owner-operators spread throughout the nation to upgrade and reorganize their kitchens for the menu change.
all-day  breakfasts  McDonald's  fast-food  QSR  operations  franchising 
january 2017 by jerryking
McDonald’s Table Service: Fast Food Redefined - WSJ
By JULIE JARGON
Nov. 18, 2016

More McDonald’s Corp. customers across the U.S. will be able to choose table service inside restaurants, in an attempt to provide something beyond what a traditional fast-food chain offers.

It is part of an effort central to revive the burger giant’s sales, which have flagged in recent quarters. Franchisees and analysts have been wondering what else McDonald’s would do to drive interest in a brand that has been struggling to re-establish its relevancy in a market where consumers have more choices than ever to get food, including burgers.

The company that derives nearly 70% of its sales from the drive-through is hoping changes to the restaurants themselves will help lift sales, according to McDonald’s USA President Chris Kempczinski.....If the restaurants aren’t able to keep their stores clean and offer friendly service—two challenges that have plagued the company—having table service isn’t going to enhance the experience, said Darren Tristano, vice president at restaurant consulting firm Technomic Inc.

In addition to table service, the company is also installing free-standing kiosks inside the restaurants, which have proven successful in overseas markets including the U.K., France and Australia, according to the company, which said people tend to order more food when they don’t feel pressured to order at the counter. Customers can pay for their food at the kiosk and indicate whether they want table service.
McDonald's  fast-food  QSR  self-service  drive-throughs  kiosks  restaurants 
january 2017 by jerryking
Why Is the McFlurry Machine Down Again? - WSJ
By JULIE JARGON
Updated Jan. 19, 2017

Last year, downed ice cream machines became the most common service-related complaint among McDonald’s customers on Twitter, according to data analytics firm Quantifind, surpassing the previous year’s sore spot of poor employee attitudes.

McDonald’s doesn’t break out sales of specific menu items. Research firm Technomic Inc. says McFlurrys represent nearly 14% of McDonald’s dessert items that consumers 18 and older purchase for themselves. Other desserts include cookies, ice cream cones and fruit pies.

Joshua Reynolds, head of marketing and client consulting at Quantifind, estimates ice cream desserts make up 3% of the company’s U.S. sales. “I’m not sure how much of that $255 million is melting down the drain, but we know that’s what’s at risk,” he said.
breakdowns  downtime  McDonald's  Flybits  ice_cream  complaints  Quantifind  fast-food 
january 2017 by jerryking
Why McDonald's Shouldn't Rush Its Digital Platform -- The Motley Fool
Asit Sharma (TMFfinosus) Mar 23, 2016

McDonald's has been late to join quick-service operators in offering a mobile app. Consumers in the U.S. are developing an expectation that they can order, receive affinity (loyalty) points, and interact socially with a brand simultaneously on a mobile device, and McDonald's risks losing millennial customers if it doesn't gradually build its own system.... some risk in relation to a mobile-based affinity program. McDonald's already uses extensive national and regional promotions, through its evolving value menu and limited-time offers. Affinity programs, if not properly implemented, can become simply another discounting mechanism, and McDonald's doesn't need yet another window for passing on discounts. The point of a well-run affinity program is to mine data collected on customers to improve sales or profits, or both. ...an interesting problem that's delaying the introduction of an "order ahead and pay" component to the McDonald's app. Roughly two-thirds of McDonald's U.S. business is transacted at the drive-through. Theoretically, if a customer orders ahead on McDonald's mobile app to pick up food at the drive-through, it's self-defeating for that customer to wait behind other cars in the line.

The company is experimenting with solutions such as designated parking for drive-through customers who order ahead. In this scenario, a customer would wait in his or her car while an employee hand-delivers the order. This is functional, but you can see the implications for McDonald's throughput at peak hours, as employees leave their posts to wade out and make parking-lot deliveries.

McDonald's executives would be loath to admit it, but I'll wager that quandaries like this make them wonder if they really need to inject a digital platform into an operation that's been optimally refined over the course of decades.
McDonald's  digital_strategies  platforms  fast-food  operations  mobile_applications  QSR  drive-throughs  restaurants  millennials  self-defeating 
january 2017 by jerryking
McDonalds outlines four global growth priorities
May 29, 2014 | | Baking Business | Baking Industry News and Opinions | by Monica Watrous 
McDonald's  fast-food  growth  priorities 
january 2017 by jerryking
A Seismic Shift in How People Eat - The New York Times
By HANS TAPARIA and PAMELA KOCHNOV. 6, 2015

....Consumers are walking away from America’s most iconic food brands. Big food manufacturers are reacting by cleaning up their ingredient labels, acquiring healthier brands and coming out with a prodigious array of new products. ....Food companies can’t merely tinker. Nor will acquisition-driven strategies prove sufficient, because most acquisitions are too small to shift fortunes quickly. ....For legacy food companies to have any hope of survival, they will have to make bold changes in their core product offerings. Companies will have to drastically cut sugar; process less; go local and organic; use more fruits, vegetables and other whole foods; and develop fresh offerings. General Mills needs to do more than just drop the artificial ingredients from Trix. It needs to drop the sugar substantially, move to 100 percent whole grains, and increase ingredient diversity by expanding to other grains besides corn....a complete overhaul of their supply chains, major organizational restructuring and billions of dollars of investment, but these corporations have the resources.
food  foodservice  brands  supply_chains  innovation  shifting_tastes  Nestlé  Perdue  Tyson  antibiotics  trends  Kraft  supermarkets  fresh_produce  OPMA  consumer_behavior  General_Mills  iconic  consumers  McDonald's  ingredient_diversity  seismic_shifts  new_products  Big_Food 
november 2015 by jerryking
Buyers and Brands Beware in China - WSJ
July 24, 2014 | WSJ | Editorials.

...Husi's behavior is a classic case of "quality fade," a term coined in the mid-2000s by China manufacturing expert Paul Midler. Companies often start out supplying high-quality products, and Husi enjoyed a top hygiene rating. But they start to cut corners in alarming ways, such as the 2007 scandal of cheap lead-based paint in children's toys.

This is especially likely to happen when customers demand lower prices but don't take an interest in how those savings are achieved. ...Lack of trust is the hallmark of life in China today, which is one reason many rich Chinese choose to move abroad....New supreme leader Xi Jinping's anticorruption campaign may bring some temporary improvement. But if he doesn't build government institutions with integrity, the cheating will resume as soon as the campaign is over.....The lesson for managers is that they must always distrust and verify what their suppliers tell them. Regularly scheduled inspections are useless as the factory will be spruced up for their visit. Surprise visits and spot checks are the only defense against fraud and fakery. In the wild west of the China market, caveat emptor is the only reliable law.
brands  caveat_emptor  China  food_safety  KFC  McDonald's  scandals  trustworthiness  lessons_learned  editorials  product_recalls  skepticism  cost-cutting  quality  high-quality 
august 2014 by jerryking
McDonald's to Promote Alternatives to Fries, Soda in Happy Meals - WSJ.com
September 26, 2013 | WSJ | By JULIE JARGON.
McDonald's to Offer Alternatives to Fries, Sodas
Hamburger Chain to Promote Milk, Juice With Happy Meals.

McDonald's Corp. plans to offer customers in its largest markets a choice of side salad, fruit or vegetable in place of French fries in its value meals and to push healthier beverages for its Happy Meals....Chief Executive Don Thompson pointed to past efforts by McDonald's to encourage kids to drink more milk in the mid-2000s, by advertising it more and using containers with vibrant colors. The chain's milk sales in the U.S. have increased by 50% since then, he said.

"We think we can influence the purchase of fruits and veggies," Mr. Thompson said in an interview. "We have a leadership role and we can be part of a solution. The average person eats at McDonald's three times a month."

The changes will be phased in to the 20 markets that represent 85% of McDonald's sales by 2020. Those markets include the U.S., China and the U.K.
McDonald's  fast-food  restaurants  salads  fresh_produce  fruits  vegetables 
september 2013 by jerryking
Yes, Healthful Fast Food Is Possible. But Edible?
April 3, 2013 |- NYTimes.com | By MARK BITTMAN

After the success of companies like Whole Foods, and healthful (or theoretically healthful) brands like Annie’s and Kashi, there’s now a market for a fast-food chain that’s not only healthful itself, but vegetarian-friendly, sustainable and even humane. And, this being fast food: cheap. “It is significant, and I do believe it is coming from consumer desire to have choices and more balance,” says Andy Barish, a restaurant analyst at Jefferies LLC, the investment bank. “And it’s not just the coasts anymore.” ...What I’d like is a place that serves only good options, where you don’t have to resist the junk food to order well, and where the food is real — by which I mean dishes that generally contain few ingredients and are recognizable to everyone, not just food technologists....In recent years, the fast-food industry has started to heed these new demands. Billions of dollars have been invested in more healthful fast-food options, and the financial incentives justify these expenditures. About half of all the money spent on food in the United States is for meals eaten outside the home. And last year McDonald’s earned $5.5 billion in profits on $88 billion in sales. If a competitor offered a more healthful option that was able to capture just a single percent of that market share, it would make $55 million. Chipotle, the best newcomer of the last generation, has beaten that 1 percent handily. Last year, sales approached $3 billion. In the fourth quarter, they grew by 17 percent over the same period in the previous year.

Numbers are tricky to pin down for more healthful options because the fast food industry doesn’t yet have a category for “healthful.”...Chipotle combines the best aspects of Nouveau Junk to create a new category that we might call Improved Fast Food. At Chipotle, the food is fresher and tastes much better than traditional fast food. The sourcing, production and cooking is generally of a higher level; and the overall experience is more pleasant. The guacamole really is made on premises, and the chicken (however tasteless) is cooked before your eyes. It’s fairly easy to eat vegan there, but those burritos can pack on the calories. As a competitor told me, “Several brands had a head start on [the Chipotle founder Steve] Ells, but he kicked their [expletive] with culture and quality. It’s not shabby for assembly-line steam-table Mexican food. It might be worth $10 billion right now.” (It is.)

Chipotle no longer stands alone in the Improved Fast Food world: Chop’t, Maoz, Freshii, Zoës Kitchen and several others all have their strong points. And — like Chipotle — they all have their limitations, starting with calories and fat.
...Veggie Grill, Lyfe Kitchen, Tender Greens and others have solved the challenge of bringing formerly upscale, plant-based foods to more of a mass audience. But the industry seems to be focused on a niche group that you might call the health-aware sector of the population. (If you’re reading this article, you’re probably in it.) Whole Foods has proved that you can build a publicly traded business, with $16 billion in market capitalization, by appealing to this niche. But fast food is, at its core, a class issue. Many people rely on that Tendercrisp because they need to, and our country’s fast-food problem won’t be solved — no matter how much innovation in vegan options or high-tech ovens — until the prices come down and this niche sector is no longer niche. ...Soda consumption is down; meat consumption is down; sales of organic foods are up; more people are expressing concern about G.M.O.s, additives, pesticides and animal welfare. The lines out the door — first at Chipotle and now at Maoz, Chop’t, Tender Greens and Veggie Grill — don’t lie. According to a report in Advertising Age, McDonald’s no longer ranks in the top 10 favorite restaurants of Millennials, a group that comprises as many as 80 million people.
Lyfe_Kitchen  Mark_Bittman  fast-food  Burger_King  Chipotle  plant-based  vegetables  fresh_produce  vegan  McDonald's  social_classes  perishables  Whole_Foods  millennials  fast-casual  new_categories 
april 2013 by jerryking
McDonald's and Other Fast-Food Chains Expand the Calendar - WSJ.com
March 5, 2013 | WSJ |By SARAH NASSAUER

The Calendar of Fast Food Restaurants Create New Seasons As Reasons to Indulge; Limited-Time Shakes...."Among the 250 largest chains in the U.S., limited-time offers have increased 25% over the last five years, according to the MenuMonitor created by Technomic, a food consulting and research firm.

Creating an unofficial calendar of limited-time fast foods can build anticipation. And consumers buy more when a limited-time offer is seasonal or linked to a specific holiday or event, say restaurants. "It's just fascinating how when leaves begin to turn consumers begin to think about pumpkin," says Mr. Costello from Dunkin' Brands. As winter approaches, people tend to have peppermint and chocolate on the brain, he says.

Even baseball season has become a peg for a new treat. Last May, Sonic's limited-time Hey Batter Batter Blast blended chocolate-chip cookie-dough batter and brownie batter with ice cream.

Spicier dishes make ideal limited-time offers because consumers may be curious about them, but not want to eat something spicy every day, say restaurants.
McDonald's  innovation  fast-food  restaurants  calendars 
march 2013 by jerryking
Chipotle, Panera Gaining Fast on McDonalds - WSJ.com
Chipotle Mexican Grill and Panera Bread, so-called fast-casual restaurants, have posted solid results even as traditional fast-food chains like McDonald's and Yum

Chipotle facing a lot of higher food costs.
web_video  McDonald's  Panera  Chipotle  fast-food  commodities  fast-casual  Tex-Mex 
february 2013 by jerryking
From Twitter to TV, McDonald’s offers answers - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Last updated Tuesday, Oct. 02 2012,
McDonald's  Susan_Krashinsky  Twitter  social_media 
october 2012 by jerryking
Former McDonald's Honchos Take On Sustainable Cuisine
07.31.12 | Wired Business | Wired.com | By Frederick Kaufman.

At Lyfe Kitchen (the name is an acronym for Love Your Food Everyday), all the cookies shall be dairy-free, all the beef from grass-fed, humanely raised cows. At Lyfe Kitchen there shall be no butter, no cream, no white sugar, no white flour, no high-fructose corn syrup, no GMOs, no trans fats, no additives, and no need for alarm: There will still be plenty of burgers, not to mention manifold kegs of organic beer and carafes of biodynamic wine. None of this would seem surprising if we were talking about one or 10 or even 20 outposts nationwide. But Lyfe’s ambition is to open hundreds of restaurants around the country, in the span of just five years....On the journey that Roberts wants to take, organic food producers and Lyfe Kitchen will travel toward a realm of financial and foodie triumph. Success will be based on the strict market discipline that made fast food possible in the first place, a drill that can now extend beyond commodity beef, commodity wheat, commodity soybean oil, commodity sugar, and commodity potatoes. Market research Roberts did at McDonald’s convinced him that mothers, the dominant decisionmakers about mealtimes, are more focused than ever on healthy food. So this time around, brussels sprouts and quinoa will enter the picture. This time around, the end result—the food—will look and smell and taste more like an entré from some bistro in Brooklyn than a 30-second stop along Fast-Food Alley. But the process will be roughly the same, in that the problems of enormous scale can be solved through similar uses of technology, efficiency, and experience. “I would say that the pattern of this mosaic is very familiar,” Roberts says. “The strategy of the rollout, the people and their skill sets, the systems of training and hiring and finance and accounting and supply chain, the development of the property and real estate system—they are all very similar.”
artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  food  McDonald's  rollouts  organic  Lyfe_Kitchen  fast-food  scaling  seasonality  fresh_produce 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Vanishing Mass Market
July 12, 2004 | BW Online | Anthony Bianco.

P&G now is standing mass marketing on its head by shifting emphasis from selling to the vast, anonymous crowd to selling to millions of particular consumers. "You find the people. You are very focused on them," Stengel says. "You become relevant to them."..."We are a big marketer," says M. Lawrence Light, McDonald's chief marketing officer, echoing Stengel's disavowals. "We are not a mass marketer."

For marketers, the evolution from mass to micromarketing is a fundamental change driven as much by necessity as opportunity...Figuring out the right way to send the right message to the right person at the right time is difficult work. It is also risky, not unlike hunting game birds with a high-powered rifle instead of a shotgun. If you miss, you miss entirely.
marketing  P&G  micro-markets  permission_marketing  target_marketing  advertising  niches  McDonald's  personalization  Jim_Stengel  the_right_people 
april 2012 by jerryking
Cash Cows: Burger Joints Call Them 'Heavy Users' -- but Not to Their Faces
January 12, 2000 | THE WALL STREET JOURNAL | By JENNIFER ORDONEZ

The heavy user accounts for only one of five fast-food patrons -- but about 60% of all
visits to fast-food restaurants. By this definition, the heavy user accounted for roughly $66 billion of the
$110 billion the National Restaurant Association says was spent on fast food last year in the U.S.
Definitions of the heavy user vary, but by any measurement, Mr. Sheridan stands out. He spends as
much as $40 a day at fast-food restaurants. He sometimes visits them more than 20 times a month -- a
qualifying number for heavy-user status, according to a survey done by marketing firm Porter Novelli....Unlike frequent fliers and preferred shoppers, heavy users get little in the way of special treatment or
freebies. At fast-food restaurants, they stand in the same lines as everyone else, indistinguishable from
light users.
fast-food  hamburgers  McDonald's  Burger_King  KFC  customer_segmentation  cash_cows  disproportionality 
october 2011 by jerryking
Ethnic Marketing: McDonald's Is Lovin' It
July 8, 2010, - BusinessWeek | Burt HelmThe BBW50 chain taps Latino and black culture for mainstream ads
McDonald's  ethnic  marketing  Latinos  African-Americans 
september 2010 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read