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How should you tap into Silicon Valley? | McKinsey & Company
September 2015
How should you tap into Silicon Valley?
By Alex Kazaks, Eric Kutcher, and Michael Uhl
McKinsey  Silicon_Valley  Communicating_&_Connecting  OPMA  howto  partnerships  innovation  boot_camps  corporate_investors 
february 2016 by jerryking
Price of fresh produce to soar while loonie plunges - The Globe and Mail
ALEKSANDRA SAGAN
TORONTO — The Canadian Press
Published Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016
fresh_produce  pricing  OPMA 
january 2016 by jerryking
Anh Nguy: Research Is Her Recipe - The New York Times
ocations
As told to PATRICIA R. OLSEN

Q. What do you do as a culinologist for Ingredion?

A. Culinology is a fusion of culinary arts and food science. Culinologists typically create food concepts for food companies and restaurants that end up on store shelves and menus. We are also known as research chefs. People come to Ingredion for the ingredients we manufacture, like starches, texturizers and sweeteners, or to collaborate on a product. I work on both types of projects in our professional test kitchen, and I also give presentations to potential customers. I’ll ask them if they want natural ingredients, a gluten-free product and so forth.
commercial_kitchens  food  career_paths  research  OPMA  foodservice  flavours  food_science  recipes  manufacturers  niches  Toronto  clusters  innovation  chefs 
november 2015 by jerryking
A Seismic Shift in How People Eat - The New York Times
By HANS TAPARIA and PAMELA KOCHNOV. 6, 2015

....Consumers are walking away from America’s most iconic food brands. Big food manufacturers are reacting by cleaning up their ingredient labels, acquiring healthier brands and coming out with a prodigious array of new products. ....Food companies can’t merely tinker. Nor will acquisition-driven strategies prove sufficient, because most acquisitions are too small to shift fortunes quickly. ....For legacy food companies to have any hope of survival, they will have to make bold changes in their core product offerings. Companies will have to drastically cut sugar; process less; go local and organic; use more fruits, vegetables and other whole foods; and develop fresh offerings. General Mills needs to do more than just drop the artificial ingredients from Trix. It needs to drop the sugar substantially, move to 100 percent whole grains, and increase ingredient diversity by expanding to other grains besides corn....a complete overhaul of their supply chains, major organizational restructuring and billions of dollars of investment, but these corporations have the resources.
food  foodservice  brands  supply_chains  innovation  shifting_tastes  Nestlé  Perdue  Tyson  antibiotics  trends  Kraft  supermarkets  fresh_produce  OPMA  consumer_behavior  General_Mills  iconic  consumers  McDonald's  ingredient_diversity  seismic_shifts  new_products  Big_Food 
november 2015 by jerryking
Ideas Ignite When Food System Actors and Burlington Techies Gather at UVM
19 Feb 2014 | Targeted News Service [Washington, D.C]

Proquest Central: hackathon and food and distribut*

The University of Vermont issued the following news:

Just the idea of a "hackathon" suggests a certain kind of energy -- creativity and cr...
ideas  hackathons  food  ecosystems  fresh_produce  OPMA 
october 2015 by jerryking
Membership Experience Not Membership Math
Posted by Amanda Kaiser on Sep 5, 2014

How do you move members away from doing that mental math? How do you make joining less transactional and focus more on experience?

Help members solve more important problems

Our visits to the zoo solve many problems for me. Superficially, we are active and outside – but I can get this at a playground. More importantly, we are having fun and learning something. Most important, I believe that experiences like this can help teach my son those life skills that will help him be well rounded, fulfilled and giving person.

The zoo markets fun and learning but stories from higher up the list of mom’s needs would resonate far more. You see this play out successfully with the big brands. Harley Davidson means freedom not transportation. Coke means youth and fun not sugar water.

You can provide the most value when you help solve your member’s most important problems.

Provide special member experiences

Many member benefits lists read like a math equation: 10% off for members, a $50 savings, and 1 free guest. This is hardly compelling reading and it is not so compelling in the decision making process either. The logic is there but the emotion is missing.

How to help LBMA members package the emotional benefits of joining so that they can be shared back at their companies?
memberships  LBMA  associations  branding  transactional_relationships  brands  value_propositions  experience  emotions  OPMA 
july 2015 by jerryking
Google Correlate: Your data, Google's computing power
Google Correlate is awesome. As I noted in Search Notes last week, Google Correlate is a new tool in Google Labs that lets you upload state- or time-based data to see what search trends most correlate with that information.

Correlation doesn't necessarily imply causation, and as you use Google Correlate, you'll find that the relationship (if any) between terms varies widely based on the topic, time, and space.

For instance, there's a strong state-based correlation between searches for me and searches for Vulcan Capital. But the two searches have nothing to do with each other. As you see below, the correlation is that the two searches have similar state-based interest.

For both searches, the most volume is in Washington state (where we're both located). And both show high activity in New York.

State-based data

For a recent talk I gave in Germany, I downloaded state-by-state income data from the U.S. Census Bureau and ran it through Google Correlate. I found that high income was highly correlated with searches for [lohan breasts] and low income was highly correlated with searches for [police shootouts]. I leave the interpretation up to you.

By default, the closest correlations are with the highest numbers, so to get correlations with low income, I multiplied all of the numbers by negative one.

Clay Johnson looked at correlations based on state obesity rates from the CDC. By looking at negative correlations (in other words, what search queries are most closely correlated with states with the lowest obesity rates), we see that the most closely related search is [yoga mat bags]. (Another highly correlated term is [nutrition school].)

Maybe there's something to that "working out helps you lose weight" idea I've heard people mention. Then again, another highly correlated term is [itunes movie rentals], so maybe I should try the "sitting on my couch, watching movies work out plan" just to explore all of my options.

To look at this data more seriously, we can see with search data alone that the wealthy seem to be healthier (at least based on obesity data) than the poor. In states with low obesity rates, searches are for optional material goods, such as Bose headphones, digital cameras, and red wine and for travel to places like Africa, Jordan, and China. In states with high obesity rates, searches are for jobs and free items.

With this hypothesis, we can look at other data (access to nutritious food, time and space to exercise, health education) to determine further links.

Time-based data

Time-based data works in a similar way. Google Correlate looks for matching patterns in trends over time. Again, that the trends are similar doesn't mean they're related. But this data can be an interesting starting point for additional investigation.

One of the economic indicators from the U.S. Census Bureau is housing inventory. I looked at the number of months' supply of homes at the current sales rate between 2003 and today. I have no idea how to interpret data like this (the general idea is that you, as an expert in some field, would upload data that you understand). But my non-expert conclusion here is that as housing inventory increases (which implies no one's buying), we are looking to spiff up our existing homes with cheap stuff, so we turn to Craigslist.

Of course, it could also be the case that the height of popularity of Craiglist just happened to coincide with the months when the most homes were on the market, and both are coincidentally declining at the same rate.

Search-based data

You can also simply enter a search term, and Google will analyze the state or time-based patterns of that term and chart other queries that most closely match those patterns. Google describes this as a kind of Google Trends in reverse.

Google Insights for Search already shows you state distribution and volume trends for terms, and Correlate takes this one step further by listing all of the other terms with a similar regional distribution or volume trend.

For instance, regional distribution for [vegan restaurants] searches is strongly correlated to the regional distribution for searches for [mac store locations].

What does the time-trend of search volume for [vegan restaurants] correlate with? Flights from LAX.

Time-based data related to a search term can be a fascinating look at how trends spark interest in particular topics. For instance, as the Atkins Diet lost popularity, so too did interest in the carbohydrate content of food.

Interest in maple syrup seems to follow interest in the cleanse diet (of which maple syrup is a key component).

Drawing-based data

Don't have any interesting data to upload? Aren't sure what topic you're most interested in? Then just draw a graph!

Maybe you want to know what had no search volume at all in 2004, spiked in 2005, and then disappeared again. Easy. Just draw it on a graph.

Apparently the popular movies of the time were "Phantom of the Opera," "Darkness," and "Meet the Fockers." And we all were worried about our Celebrex prescriptions.

(Note: the accuracy of this data likely is dependent on the quality of your drawing skills.)

OSCON Data 2011, being held July 25-27 in Portland, Ore., is a gathering for developers who are hands-on, doing the systems work and evolving architectures and tools to manage data. (This event is co-located with OSCON.)

Save 20% on registration with the code OS11RAD

Related:

Data science democratized
Dashboards evolve to meet social and business needs
A new focus on user-friendly data analysis
Social data is an oracle waiting for a question
causality  Data  Future_of_Search  analytics  datatool  googlecorrelate  via:moon  house  LBMA  OPMA  correlations  time-based  geographic_sorting  tools  digital_cameras 
july 2015 by jerryking
Sponsor Generated Content: The State of the Data Economy
June 23, 2014

Where the Growth is
So for many companies right now, the core of the data economy is a small but growing segment—the information two billion-plus global Internet users create when they click "like" on a social media page or take action online. Digital customer tracking—the selling of “digital footprints” (the trail of information consumers leave behind each time they surf the Web)—is now a $3 billion segment, according to a May 2014 Outsell report. At the moment, that's tiny compared to the monetary value of traditional market research such as surveys, forecasting and trend analysis. But digital customer tracking "is where the excitement and growth is," says Giusto.

Real-time data that measures actions consumers are actually taking has more value than study results that rely on consumer opinions. Not surprising, businesses are willing to pay more for activity-based data.

Striking it Richer
Outsell Inc.'s analyst Chuck Richard notes that the specificity of data has a huge affect on its value. In days past, companies would sell names, phone numbers, and email addresses as sales leads. Now, data buyers have upped the ante. They want richer data—names of consumers whose current "buying intent" has been analyzed through behavioral analytics. Beyond the “who,” companies want the “what” and “when” of purchases, along with “how” best to engage with prospects.
"Some companies are getting a tenfold premium for data that is very focused and detailed," Richard says. "For example, if you had a list of all the heart specialists in one region, that’s worth a lot."

Tapping into New Veins
Moving forward, marketers will increasingly value datasets that they can identify, curate and exploit. New technology could increase the value of data by gleaning insights from unstructured data (video, email and other non-traditional data sources); crowdsourcing and social media could generate new types of shareable data; predictive modeling and machine learning could find new patterns in data, increasing the value of different types of data.

Given all this, the data economy is sure to keep growing, as companies tap into new veins of ever-richer and more-specific data.
data  data_driven  SAS  real-time  digital_footprints  OPMA  datasets  unstructured_data  data_marketplaces  value_creation  specificity  value_chains  intentionality  digital_economy  LBMA  behavioural_data  predictive_modeling  machine_learning  contextual  location_based_services  activity-based  consumer_behavior 
july 2014 by jerryking
Fresh Produce Group Chooses NetSuite Over the Competition
Challenges:
Previous systems provided limited visibility into company financial performance.
Vital information had to be retrieved from multiple sources, leading to frustrating delays in financial and management reporting.
High levels of manual processing were required to maintain spreadsheets for forecasting and inventory management, which was costly and prone to error.
An inefficient paper-based inventory management system meant perishable produce was regularly wasted.
Hours were also lost every week locating pallets on the warehouse floor.
Non-financial staff had very limited access to vital business data needed to be more accountable in their roles.
fresh_produce  ERP  challenges  information  IT  perishables  OPMA  spreadsheets  inefficiencies 
june 2014 by jerryking
HARNESSING THE GIANT
BRIAN PETERSON

Brian Peterson runs Wal-Mart's perishables, but he knows how to squeeze a tomato and argue in Sicilian when it comes to the products he buys. "Even though I work for the largest reta...
fresh_produce  Wal-Mart  perishables  OPMA  merchandising 
march 2014 by jerryking
Why Imagination and Curiosity Matter More Than Ever - The CIO Report - WSJ
January 31, 2014 | WSJ | By Irving Wladawsky-Berger.

How can you foster imagination and curiosity? This was the subject of the 2011 book co-authored by JSB: A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change. One of its key points is that learning has to evolve from something that only happens in the classroom to what that he calls connected learning, taking advantage of all the available resources, including tinkering with the system, playing games and perhaps most important, absorbing new ideas from your peers, from adjacent spaces and from other disciplines....How do you decide what problems to work on and try to solve? This second kind of innovation–which they call interpretation–is very different in nature from analysis. You are not solving a problem, but looking for a new insight about customers and the marketplace, a new idea for a product or a service, a new approach to producing and delivering them, a new business model. It requires the curiosity and imagination.
STEM  imagination  tacit_data  Roger_Martin  Rotman  critical_thinking  innovation  customer_insights  books  interpretation  curiosity  OPMA  organizational_culture  cross-pollination  second-order  ideas  new_businesses  learning  connected_learning  constant_change  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  worthwhile_problems  new_products  mental_dexterity  tinkerers 
february 2014 by jerryking
Market Trends and Retailers’ Strategies in Fresh Produce
26-27 April 2007 | Dr. Marian Garcia, Kent Business School, University of Kent.

Suppliers of fresh produce are less able to differentiate their products at the consumer level
==> They are in a weak bargaining position as price differentiation is almost the only available strategy.

Impact on Fresh Produce Suppliers
* Despite increasing rationalization of the supply base, retailers are still able to switch volumes between suppliers of fresh produce.
* As a result, suppliers of fresh produce are often forced to accept low prices in order to get volume growth, which does little to improve their immediate and long-term financial performance.
* In response to consumer trends and marketing demands, innovative growers of fresh produce have increased their cooperation and involvement with buyers and other members of the supply chain to ensure their produce meet consumer expectations.
* Closer relationships between the various members in the supply chain, ensure information is shared and can be used to improve the competitive position of all members in that supply chain.
fresh_produce  marketing  trends  consolidation  information_flows  grocery  supermarkets  OPMA  strategies  retailers  Tesco  Sainsbury's  ASDA  supply_chains  private_labels  relationships 
january 2014 by jerryking
How Big Data Is Changing Food Consumption
March 7, 2013 | | SmartData Collective

big data food consumptionby Ana Andreescu from GoodData
massive_data_sets  mobile_applications  policy  food  Waudware  OPMA  fresh_produce 
december 2013 by jerryking
WHOLESALE The real squeezed middle?
From dealing with ongoing margin pressure in a low growth environment, to dealing with higher customer expectations,
and mounting concerns about the black market, the challenges facing wholesalers are considerable. However, the picture is not all gloom. Opportunities still exist for operators able to supply goods in line with changing industry trends, while maintaining a low cost base. Increasingly this will be through supply chain integration and enhanced service levels. But, ultimately winners will be wholesalers that can effectively reinvent themselves by developing new
hooks into their customers.

Demand is highly influenced by end user trends. However, wholesalers only have limited ability to respond quickly.

The ability to source and alter stock in line with changing trends is vital, especially in terms of broadening of the
product range.

Wholesale is generally a high volume low margin industry with operating margins of only 1-2%.

Margins are constantly being squeezed. Bargaining power in many consumer goods markets has been weakened by
powerful manufacturers and dominant retailers.
responding to end-user trends
margin pressure

Most wholesalers now offer a range of new added value services. White label provision and web integration
increasingly common

Service level agreements increasingly tight

Symbol groups have become more popular across the grocery sector, with increased investment in own-label
development. In other sectors branding has never been more important.

The introduction of tightly-managed production techniques has resulted in greater sophistication in distribution
chains

Wholesalers are now expected to have systems in place to run goods direct from production plant to end-users

Disruption in overseas supply chains caused by ‘growing pains’ in emerging markets is becoming increasingly
common.
enhanCed serviCe levels supplY Chain integration

The black and grey markets, and fraud in general is on the increase. Alcohol duty fraud is a particular concern

Sourcing from correct brand owners is becoming more difficult. Fines for the possession of fraudulent stock are
becoming more severe.
fruits  vegetables  wholesalers  challenges  problems  margins  supply_chains  fresh_produce  OPMA  slow_growth  black_markets  low_growth  customer_expectations 
october 2013 by jerryking
HOW TO SELL FRESH PRODUCE TO SUPERMARKET CHAINS
March 1999 | | Bobby G. Beamer, Adjunct Professor, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Virginia Tech.

The most common approach to penetrating the fresh produce market has been to identify market windows created by seasonal production variations in major production areas. To attract buyers, local producers have attempted to fill market windows left open by established marketing channels. This production
approach to marketing fails to consider the needs of their customers: the retail supermarkets and their buyers.
However, by adopting a marketing approach , growers can establish better long-term relationships with their customers and capture more benefits than merely competing with other producing regions on price. Marketing efforts must begin before production as growers learn about buyers` needs and
requirements, including grade, quality, packaging, and delivery, in addition to learning which individual produce items are needed. The marketing approach, then, requires that growers produce what they can sell rather than trying to sell what they have produced. With the emphasis on variety in the produce section, Virginia growers may find more production opportunities in the specialty item category than by attempting to meet the shortages created by seasonal production
variations.

the average produce department in 1994 occupied 12 percent of the total store space but generated almost 17 percent of the average profits for the store. Previous research (Runyan, et al .) identified the following problems that can hinder the development of a good relationship between buyers and producers:
∑ lack of consistent quality,
∑ uneven sizing and grading,
∑ product too mature,
∑ lack of advance notice of product availability,
∑ inadequate removal of field heat, and
∑ lack of organization among local growers.

CONCLUSIONS
This study confirms the conditions for market entry described by Ryan, et al .: consistent grading for quality, even sizing, proper product maturity; removal of field heat; anticipated arrivals; and grower organizations. Merchandisers stressed the importance of good relationships, stating that new producers would have a hard time penetrating the market because of the loyalty factor established between growers and buyers. Part of this relationship is that ì. . . even at a cheaper price, itís going to be hard to pry us away from [our usual suppliers] because they provide consistent size, color, packing, and delivery. If we call them up and say that weíre short and need another truck load, theyíll have it here for us this
afternoon.îThe existence of these relationships emphasizes the need for the producer to get to know the market.
Rather than trying to compete with existing relationships, producers need to identify commodities having inconsistent supplies or poorly established supply relationships.

During interviews, produce merchandisers consistently expressed doubts about the willingness of small-scale, local produce growers to adopt practices conducive to the establishment of relationships . Although small-scale producers lack the economies of size that enable large-scale producers to invest in equipment and facilities, new institutions, such as the shipping-point markets, may provide small firms with the support needed to establish market relationships. However, such marketing support may be coming at the wrong end of the production process. Traditionally, fruit and vegetable growers, like many people involved in agricultural production, view their role primarily as commodity producers. The primary emphasis is placed on producing a good product, while marketing is viewed as strictly a post-harvest activity. One merchandiser related the story of a new producer who grew several acres of Daikon, a large, hot Japanese radish. The producer was disappointed to discover that after harvesting the crop no one was interested in purchasing it. Such a problem could have been avoided if the grower had invested some time, prior to production, in market research. Unfortunately, many producers still follow this approach in the production and marketing of fresh fruits and vegetables
fresh_produce  supermarkets  grocery  howto  market_windows  statistics  profitability  barriers_to_entry  farming  agriculture  Virginia  decision_trees  WaudWare  OPMA 
april 2013 by jerryking
A fresh approach to growth
October 13, 2010

In Canada, fresh-cut fruits and vegetables and packaged salads represent nearly 20% of the total produce available in grocery stores. The industry is worth an estimated $14 billion a year in North America.

“Perishable commodities are as unpredictable as the stock market,” Karr says. “It’s a complex business because there are so many variables that are impossible to control, such as weather and growing conditions. In my world, you always need a contingency plan.”
fresh_produce  Canada  entrepreneur  salads  OPMA  fruits  vegetables  perishables  commodities  unpredictability  weather  contingency_planning  grocery 
february 2013 by jerryking
Surprise business result? Explore whether it is a hidden opportunity
June 18, 2007 | G&M pg. B8 | George Stalk Jr.

What does it take to capitalize on anomalies systematically?

For starters, you need to have metrics and information systems that are sufficiently refined to identify anomalies in the first place. Knowing the average margins and market share isn’t enough; look at the entire range of outcomes—across customers, geographies, products, and the like. This allows you to surface out-of-the-ordinary results for closer inspection.

The next step is to separate wheat from chaff: those anomalies that signal a potential business opportunity from those that are merely one-time events. The key is to examine the pattern of unusual performance over time. The customer who consistently buys high volumes or the market that outperforms the average year after year are, by definition, not random. Is there an underlying cause that can be identified and then replicated elsewhere?

Finally, you need to understand the precise mechanisms that animate the anomalies you identify. Why is the unusual pattern of performance happening? What specific features of the product or the local environment or the customer experience are bringing it about? Don’t accept the usual first-order explanations. It’s not enough to know that a particular customer has been loyal for years; find out precisely why.

It’s up to senior management to create the forum for asking why and to persist until the question is answered with genuine insight.
metrics  George_Stalk_Jr.  BCG  anomalies  growth  opportunities  customer_insights  surprises  systematic_approaches  quizzes  ratios  pattern_recognition  insights  questions  first-order  second-order  OPMA  Waudware  curiosity  new_businesses  one-time_events  signals  noise  overlooked_opportunities  latent  hidden  averages  information_systems  assessments_&_evaluations  randomness  5_W’s 
january 2013 by jerryking
How we ate: 2012's most important ideas in food and drink
Jan. 01 2013 | - The Globe and Mail |CHRIS NUTTALL-SMITH.

Canada’s two-tier food system is official

The downside to foodies as a political force: While rich, urban epicures rallied against that quarry, they were mostly silent during the XL Foods Inc. E. coli crisis, as tainted, factory-processed feedlot beef was recalled across Canada, and the federal government made clear that its first priority is protecting Canada’s agribusiness – as opposed to Canada’s people.

I don’t blame the foodies – you can take on only so many issues, and many will argue, correctly, that a rising good-food tide eventually lifts all boats.

But the silence made sense for another reason: Rich epicures, with their love of small producers, artisanal butcher shops and pastured protein, don’t eat factory-processed feedlot beef. The plebes, meantime – the vast majority of Canadians – had better learn to fend for themselves.
food  trends  Chris_Nuttall-Smith  product_recalls  E._coli  beef  OPMA  ideas 
january 2013 by jerryking
Supermarket Challenges and Opportunities for Producers and Shippers: US Experience1
February Quarter 2005 | Farm Policy Journal Vol. 2 No. 1 |Roberta Cook
Extension Marketing Economist, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

The United States fresh fruit and vegetable market place has undergone consolidation in recent years, the
result being fewer, larger buyers who cater for large retailers. A large proportion of fresh produce is now
sold directly by shippers to retailers, bypassing intermediaries and wholesale markets. Transactions in
this consolidated market place involve more complex sales arrangements which can include off-invoice
fees and also quality, packaging and food safety requirements. More buyers in the food retail industry
are moving to seasonal and annual contracts which vary considerably for any given commodity. The
foodservice industry is also increasingly purchasing directly from shippers based in production regions.
Consolidation of food retail grocery stores has induced consolidation of shippers as firms attempt to match
the scale of the few, larger buyers. Shippers are now more market orientated and seek growers willing to
make changes necessary to be part of a more tightly controlled, yet geographically dispersed supply chain.
Contracts between shippers and producers are typically not fix-priced contracts, and focus on meeting
year-round consumer demand. Shippers reduce seasonal supply variation using imported products which
has implications for early and late season producers who may permanently face lower average prices.
Ultimately producers benefit by marketing through a shipper who can accurately reflect both shortand
longer-term market signals and can also assemble larger supplies of consistent quality products.
grocery  supermarkets  shippers  fresh_produce  OPMA  farming  agriculture  fruits  vegetables  consolidation  challenges  opportunities  Roberta_Cook 
june 2012 by jerryking
New business model grows family farm into global player - The Globe and Mail
PAUL WALDIE innovators
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2010 (send to Michael Watson)
In 2005, Mr. Menzies agreed to return home and become a co-owner of Wigmore Farms. He came with one condition – the farm’s business model had to change.

Instead of growing crops and then finding a buyer, Mr. Menzies said the farm had to start looking for customers first. The typical farm model is “backward to everything I ever did in the engineering and technology side,” he said in an interview. “We looked for a need and we filled it. And where we found that need was from the world.”
business_models  farming  agriculture  globalization  Wigmore_Farms  Paul_Waldie  change  OPMA  family_business 
may 2012 by jerryking
Agriculture, Issue 3, Evidence - October 27, 2011
Proceedings of the Standing Senate Committee on
Agriculture and Forestry
Issue 3 - Evidence - Meeting of October 27, 2011
OTTAWA, Thursday, October 27, 2011

In terms of developing new markets domestically and internationally, the lack of sound market information for the fresh fruit and vegetable sector is a current gap and potential opportunity for the government to support business planning, trade negotiations and the sustainability of the Canadian fresh fruit and vegetable industry within our global marketplace.

I must note that the current Infohort system is underfunded and under resourced. Industry and government are currently working in the dark and at a competitive disadvantage when it comes to market information on a domestic level. Accurate market information is essential to support our needs for market and economic analyses to build business and cultivate opportunities.
data  parliamentary_system  agribusiness  agriculture  farming  fruits  fresh_produce  OPMA  vegetables  challenges  information_gaps 
may 2012 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: Solving the problem isn't the problem
Seth Godin on May 08, 2012

The problem is finding a vector that pays for itself as you scale.

We see a problem and we think we've "solved" it, but if there isn't a scalable go-to-market business approach behind the solution, it's not going to work.

This is where engineers and other problem solvers so often get stuck. Industries and organizations and systems aren't broken because no one knows how to solve their problem. They're broken because the difficult part is finding a scalable, profitable way to market and sell the solution.
Seth_Godin  problem_solving  scaling  problems  OPMA  Michael_McDerment 
may 2012 by jerryking
Supermarket Challenges and Opportunities for Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Producers and Shippers: Lessons from the US Experience
May 24, 2004 | Paper presented at the Conference on Supermarkets and Agricultural Development in China – Opportunities and Challenges| By
Dr. Roberta L. Cook, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics
University of California, Davis found by Googling "challenges vegetable shippers"
fruits  vegetables  agribusiness  supermarkets  challenges  agriculture  farming  shippers  OPMA  grocery  Roberta_Cook  fresh_produce 
may 2012 by jerryking
UNPRECEDENTED VOLATILITY A HALLMARK OF AGRICULTURE’S NEW AGE
* Have a plan for the future – perhaps a surprise to some, but many farmers don’t have a plan in place that paints a vision for where they want to take their operation over the next 2, 5 and 10 years.
• Have credit in place before it is actually required – it is human nature to leave things to the last minute.
• Implement a sound hedging strategy – in addition to the system of crop insurance in place in this country, there are many ways that Canadian farmers can take actions to manage their risk. Diversifying into new businesses is one example.
• Well-managed risk can pay off – at the same time, taking on some risk that is prudent and ts the risk pro le of the farming operation can pay off handsomely for farmers. In such a volatile and fast paced environment, there are bound to be some buying and selling opportunities that open up. Knowing when to take advantage of them can separate successful farms with those that muddle along.
• Know your costs – many producers have a good sense of how their top line is performing. But it is just as impor-tant to have a good understanding of the cost side of the equation.
• Maintain adequate liquidity and reasonable leverage – in order to mitigate the risks associated with increasing asset prices, it would be prudent for farmers to ensure that they have sufficient liquidity and manageable leverage if they are expanding.
• Use reasonable interest rate assumptions in assessing investment opportunities – even though borrowing costs are unusually low, farmers must be mindful of the fact that this low-rate environment won’t last forever.
agriculture  uncertainty  volatility  farming  liquidity  leverage  hedging  futures_contracts  diversification  new_businesses  risks  risk-management  risk-taking  OPMA  WaudWare  interest_rates  vision  long-term  never_forever  business_planning  credit  costs  anticipating  risk-mitigation  low-interest  cost-consciousness 
may 2012 by jerryking
OPMA ::: Ontario Produce Marketing Association
Ontario Produce Marketing Association (OPMA)
Non-profit organization founded in 1990 HQ: Toronto, Ontario
The OPMA serves 220 members from all sectors of the fresh produce industry who share a common interest in supporting the Ontario fresh produce market; they represent over 90% of produce sales in Ontario.
The primary objective of the OPMA is to promote the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables within Ontario.

(1) Education & Training
(2) Events & Networking
(3) Services (e.g. temperature reorders)
(4) Marketing
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The Ontario Produce Marketing Association held its Annual General Meeting, June 13 at the Ontario Food Terminal’s Market Garden Restaurant. The meeting focused on key work underway by the association, including industry training, marketing efforts to increase consumption of produce in Ontario, government relations and industry networking events.

OPMA-July-2nd
Ian MacKenzie, president of the Ontario Produce Marketing Association, and Ashlee Mclean, director of marketing and communications.
Presentations included a report from outgoing Chair Julian Sarraino of Fresh Taste Produce Ltd., the president’s report and finance report by OPMA President Ian MacKenzie and a look at the extensive marketing program by Ashlee Mclean, OPMA’s director of marketing and communications.

A resolution was brought forward to the membership and passed to increase the number of the board directors. Raising the board size from nine to 11 will aid in providing additional assistance and expertise for the work to be carried out by the association. The newly elected board includes Chair Frank Spagnuolo of Loblaw Inc.; Vice-Chair Chris Streef of Streef Produce Ltd.; Mr. Sarraino; Derrick Rayner of Earth Fresh Foods; Charles Waud of Waudware Inc.; Steve Bamford of Fresh Advancements; Joe Didiano of Scotlynn Investments; Steve Dimen of Ippolito Fruit & Produce Ltd.; Frank Bondi of Sobeys Ontario; Greg Maffey of Walmart Canada; and Virginia Zimm of Faye Clack Communications Inc.

One of the highlights of the meeting was the announcement of Fresh Fest, a fall event that will see the Ontario Food Terminal open to the public for the first time in its history.
farming  agriculture  associations  marketing  OPMA 
march 2012 by jerryking
Challenges of the Food Industry
Toni Holenstein

This presentation contains information on the following subjects: challenges within the food industry, worldwide food supply, food preservation and transportation, safety and health issues, obesity and diabetes trends, U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Pyramid, and various diet hypes. Please view the PDF overheads for additional information.

For more information, contact Toni Holenstein, Bühler AG, Uzwil, Switzerland 9240; 41-71-955-34-38; fax 41-71-955-27-27; anton.holenstein@buhlergroup.com.
challenges  food  industries  OPMA 
february 2012 by jerryking
Mining of Raw Data May Bring New Productivity, a Study Says - NYTimes.com
May 13, 2011 | NYT | By STEVE LOHR.
(fresh produce) Data is a vital raw material of the information economy, much as coal
and iron ore were in the Industrial Revolution. But the business world
is just beginning to learn how to process it all. The current data surge
is coming from sophisticated computer tracking of shipments, sales,
suppliers and customers, as well as e-mail, Web traffic and social
network comments. ..Mining and analyzing these big new data sets can
open the door to a new wave of innovation, accelerating productivity and
economic growth. ..The next stage, they say, will exploit
Internet-scale data sets to discover new businesses and predict consumer
behavior and market shifts.
....The McKinsey Global Institute is publishing “Big Data: The Next
Frontier for Innovation, Competition and Productivity.” It makes
estimates of the potential benefits from deploying data-harvesting
technologies and skills.
massive_data_sets  Steve_Lohr  McKinsey  data  consumer_behavior  data_driven  data_mining  analytics  Freshbooks  digital_economy  fresh_produce  OPMA  Industrial_Revolution  datasets  new_businesses  productivity 
may 2011 by jerryking
All I ever needed to know about change management - - Organization - Change Management
MAY 1997 | McKinsey Quarterly | ROGER DICKHOUT offers 5 basic
premises to help clients design organizational change programs—ideas
Dickout considers as natural laws:
(1) the law of constituent balance--change driven by an imbalance
between a company’s stakeholders: shareholders, employees, customers,
communities, & mgmt.
(2) the law of leverage. Max. the return on effort by changing those
things that will produce the greatest results/really matter.
(3) the law of momentum. Liberate the energy to drive the change. Change
is work. Work requires energy. That energy can be introduced from
outside—e.g. pressure from shareholders or new mgmt.—or the system’s own
potential energy can be transformed into kinetic energy.
(4) the law of feedback and adjustment. Learn how your organization
responds to change, and adjust the program accordingly. N.B.Change may
itself create opportunity.
(5) the law of leadership.Leadership is the scarce resource and
ultimately, the catalyst of change.
McKinsey  change_management  organizational_change  leadership  feedback  leverage  OPMA  momentum  constituencies  adjustments  return_on_effort  imbalances  what_really_matters 
april 2011 by jerryking
More Than A New Word
Jan 2008 | American Fruit Grower. Vol. 128, Iss. 1; pg. 50, 1 pgs | by Brian D Sparks. (Idea for Investeco?)
locavore  Investeco  OPMA  fresh_produce  agriculture  farming 
june 2009 by jerryking
The Community Network Solution
11-28-07| strategy+business | by Karen Stephenson
“heterarchies”: high-trust connections among particular groups of three or more organizations.
Applicable to Toronto economic development idea to spur entrepreneurship?? for Rob Berry
social_networking  networks  relationships  analysis  economic_development  social_capital  toronto  Communicating_&_Connecting  OPMA 
april 2009 by jerryking
Finding opportunities with deep customer 'discovery'
February 23, 2009 G&M column by GEORGE STALK JR.

One approach that works for customer-supplier partnerships is something we call "discovery," which goes beyond cost reduction tactics to find opportunities for increasing revenues and improving entire processes....The discovery process goes behind traditional contact points to explore issues that affect the hand-offs, such as consumer usage, retail merchandising, promotional effectiveness and pricing.

By using fact-based analysis, information technology and strong project management, discovery has transformed purchasing department contacts into broader, deeper relationships, helped suppliers and customers create new value in their businesses, and led to dramatically more innovative products and services.
opportunities  business_development  George_Stalk_Jr.  discoveries  partnerships  process_improvements  IT  LBMA  OPMA  customer_insights  cost-cutting  BCG  merchandising  pricing  handoffs  purchasing  relationships  new_products 
february 2009 by jerryking

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