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jerryking : ogilvy_&_mather   10

Little Brother
Sep 11th 2014 | The Economist | Alexandra Suich.

In 1963 David Ogilvy, the father of Madison Avenue and author of a classic business book, “Confessions of an Advertising Man”, wrote: “An advertisement is like a radar sweep, constantly hunting new prospects as they come into the market. Get a good radar, and keep it sweeping.”.....Behavioural profiling has gone viral across the internet, enabling firms to reach users with specific messages based on their location, interests, browsing history and demographic group......Extreme personalisation in advertising has been slow to come... online advertising space is unlimited and prices are low, so making money is not as easy as it was in the offline world,.....Digital advertising is being buoyed by three important trends. The first is the rise of mobile devices, such as smartphones....The second, related trend is the rise of social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, which have become an important navigation system for people looking for content across the web. ......The third big development has been the rise of real-time bidding, or “programmatic buying”, a new system for targeting consumers precisely and swiftly with online adverts. Publishers, advertisers and intermediaries can now bid for digital ads electronically and direct them to specific consumers at lightning speed.....The lines between established media businesses are becoming blurred. Richard Edelman, the boss of Edelman, a public-relations firm, describes the media and advertising business as a “mosh pit”. .... clients’ biggest question is whether people will even notice their ads. ...This special report will show that technology is profoundly changing the dynamics of advertising. Building on the vast amount of data produced by consumers’ digital lives, it is giving more power to media companies that have a direct relationship with their customers and can track them across different devices. ....Consumers may gain from advertising tailored to their particular needs, and so far most of them seem content to accept the ensuing loss of privacy. But companies are sensitive to the potential costs of overstepping the mark. As the head of one British advertising firm puts it: “Once people realise what’s happening, I can’t imagine there won’t be pushback.”
Facebook  Twitter  Pinterest  Ogilvy_&_Mather  David_Ogilvy  behavioural_targeting  pushback  books  effectiveness  haystacks  privacy  native_advertising  ad-tech  Conversant  Kraft  personalization  trends  mobile_phones  smartphones  social_media  real-time  auctions  programmatic  advertising  online_advertising  Omnicom 
february 2017 by jerryking
The networker: Martin Sorrell of WPP - FT.com
March 13, 2015| FT | Andrew Hill.

After 30 years, WPP now embraces some of the best-known names in marketing, advertising and public relations, including Ogilvy & Mather, J Walter Thompson and Burson-Marsteller.
In the process, Sorrell has become one of the best-connected executives in the world....Sorrell performs a similar role at WPP, using a combination of visionary pronouncements and obsessive micromanagement of clients, finances and employees. ....later this year a new chairman, Roberto Quarta, will take over. Quarta, a tough Italian-American with a background in private equity, is expected to be less submissive to WPP’s chief executive than previous chairmen. The question of how long Sorrell ­continues in his role, who could succeed him, and what will happen to the WPP empire if he goes, will be the most important issue on Quarta’s desk....“[If] I have been behaving as an owner, rather than as a ‘highly paid manager’ . . . mea culpa. I thought that was the object of the exercise,” he wrote.
Martin_Sorrell  WPP  advertising  advertising_agencies  succession  deal-making  WEF_Davos  legacies  JWT  Ogilvy_&_Mather  owners  Burson-Marsteller 
march 2015 by jerryking
Shelly Lazarus: A front seat witness to advertising's gender shift - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 29 2015

You started at Ogilvy when David Ogilvy was still around. What was the best advice he ever gave you?

If you attract the right people and you create an environment where they’re as successful as they can possibly be, everything follows from that. ... He judged the output vigorously. He would have divine discontent, we would say. Nothing was ever good enough. If we said, okay, the work could be better, how do we get there? He would go back to either better people, or a better environment where they could do better work. Every answer came back to the quality of the people.
advice  advertising_agencies  Shelly_Lazarus  women  advertising  people_skills  resilience  bouncing_back  dissatisfaction  Managing_Your_Career  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Susan_Krashinsky  David_Ogilvy  Pablo_Picasso  professional_service_firms  the_right_people 
february 2015 by jerryking
Ten Laws Of The Modern World
04.19.05 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard.

• Gilder's Law: Winner's Waste. The futurist George Gilder wrote about this a few years ago in a Forbes publication. The best business models, he said, waste the era's cheapest resources in order to conserve the era's most expensive resources. When steam became cheaper than horses, the smartest businesses used steam and spared horses. Today the cheapest resources are computer power and bandwidth. Both are getting cheaper by the year (at the pace of Moore's Law). Google (nasdaq: GOOG - news - people ) is a successful business because it wastes computer power--it has some 120,000 servers powering its search engine--while it conserves its dearest resource, people. Google has fewer than 3,500 employees, yet it generates $5 billion in (current run rate) sales.

• Ricardo's Law. The more transparent an economy becomes, the more David Ricardo's 19th-century law of comparative advantage rules the day. Then came the commercial Internet, the greatest window into comparative advantage ever invented. Which means if your firm's price-value proposition is lousy, too bad. The world knows.

• Wriston's Law. This is named after the late Walter Wriston, a giant of banking and finance. In his 1992 book, The Twilight of Sovereignty, Wriston predicted the rise of electronic networks and their chief effect. He said capital (meaning both money and ideas), when freed to travel at the speed of light, "will go where it is wanted, stay where it is well-treated...." By applying Wriston's Law of capital and talent flow, you can predict the fortunes of countries and companies.

• The Laffer Curve. In the 1970s the young economist Arthur Laffer proposed a wild idea. Cut taxes at the margin, on income and capital, and you'll get more tax revenue, not less. Laffer reasoned that lower taxes would beckon risk capital out of hiding. Businesses and people would become more productive. The pie would grow. Application of the Laffer Curve is why the United States boomed in the 1980s and 1990s, why India is rocking now and why eastern Europe will outperform western Europe.

• Drucker's Law. Odd as it seems, you will achieve the greatest results in business and career if you drop the word "achievement" from your vocabulary. Replace it with "contribution," says the great management guru Peter Drucker. Contribution puts the focus where it should be--on your customers, employees and shareholders.

• Ogilvy's Law. David Ogilvy gets my vote as the greatest advertising mind of the 20th century. The founder of Ogilvy & Mather--now part of WPP (nasdaq: WPPGY - news - people )--left a rich legacy of ideas in his books, my favorite being Ogilvy on Advertising. Ogilvy wrote that whenever someone was appointed to head an office of O&M, he would give the manager a Russian nesting doll. These dolls open in the middle to reveal a smaller doll, which opens in the middle to reveal a yet smaller doll...and so on. Inside the smallest doll would be a note from Ogilvy. It read: "If each of us hires people who are smaller than we are, we shall become a company of dwarfs. But if each of us hires people who are bigger than we are, we shall become a company of giants." Ogilvy knew in the 1950s that people make or break businesses. It was true then; it's truer today.
Rich_Karlgaard  matryoshka_dolls  Moore's_Law  Metcalfe's_Law  Peter_Drucker  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Gilder's_Law  hiring  talent  advertising_agencies  transparency  value_propositions  capital_flows  talent_flows  David_Ogilvy  inexpensive  waste  abundance  scarcity  constraints  George_Gilder 
june 2012 by jerryking
In Ad Campaign, SAP Looks Beyond Business Customers - NYTimes.com
April 16, 2012, 12:14 am
In Ad Campaign, SAP Looks Beyond Business Customers
By TANZINA VEGA
SAP  WPP  Ogilvy_&_Mather  advertising_agencies  advertising 
april 2012 by jerryking
Charlotte Beers, on the Importance of Self-Assessment - NYTimes.com
March 31, 2012 | NYT | By ADAM BRYANT. This interview with Charlotte Beers was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant. Ms. Beers, former chairwoman and C.E.O. of Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide, now runs seminars called “The X Factor” for women who are leaders.
Charlotte_Beers  women  self-assessment  CEOs  advertising_agencies  Ogilvy_&_Mather 
april 2012 by jerryking
The Manager - The Globe and Mail
Postscript

Charlotte Beers, former CEO of Ogilvy & Mather, provides a blueprint for women who are seeking leadership positions in I’d Rather Be in Charge (Vanguard Press, 242 pages, $29.00).

If you serve on the board of a not-for-profit organization, you might find some guidance from the third edition of The Nonprofit Board Answer Book (Jossey Bass, 363 pages, $51.95), put together by BoardSource, which works to provide excellence in such boards.

Illinois-based consultant Matt Anderson has built his business through referrals; he shares his advice in Fearless Referrals (McGraw-Hill, 232 pages, $21.95).
books  Harvey_Schachter  blueprints  Charlotte_Beers  Ogilvy_&_Mather  nonprofit  boards_&_directors_&_governance  referrals 
march 2012 by jerryking
WPP's Ogilvy & Mather to Launch China-Focused Division in U.S. - WSJ.com
APRIL 11, 2011 | WSJ | By LAURIE BURKITT. The new venture
places the agency amid a growing roster of law firms, investment banks
and consultancies that are building their staffs and creating new
services to cater to the government's initiative to build up Chinese
businesses abroad.
WPP  China  New_York_City  public_relations  advertising_agencies  FDI  China_rising  Ogilvy_&_Mather  product_launches 
april 2011 by jerryking
Agency Leadership Advice: Branding Strategy Insider
Shelly Lazarus, Chairman & CEO, Ogilvy & Mather
Worldwide. Excerpted from her January 2005 article The Best Advice I
Ever Got in the HBR. David Ogilvy 's advice, "No matter how much time
you spend thinking about, worrying about, focusing on, questioning the
value of, and evaluating people, it won’t be enough, he said. People are
the only thing that matters, and the only thing you should think about,
because when that part is right, everything else works."...."the truth
is that clients come and go: You’ll always win another one, and another
will go away. The real problem came when people within a company became
dispirited and demotivated, engulfed by crisis, felt differently about
the work they were doing, and were ready to walk away in a huff, wanting
nothing more to do with it. The challenge, therefore, is not simply to
win back a big account. It was to motivate the people to forget about
the catastrophe and focus on the work"
advice  advertising_agencies  advertising  bouncing_back  CEOs  David_Ogilvy  demotivated  dispirited  enterprise_clients  Managing_Your_Career  motivations  Ogilvy_&_Mather  people_skills  resilience  Shelly_Lazarus  walking_away  win_backs  women 
december 2010 by jerryking
C.E.O. Libraries Reveal Keys to Success
July 21, 2007 | New York Times | By HARRIET RUBIN. Serious
leaders who are serious readers build personal libraries dedicated to
how to think, not how to compete. If there is a C.E.O. canon, its rule
is this: “Don’t follow your mentors, follow your mentors’ mentors,”
suggests David Leach, chief executive of the American Medical
Association’s accreditation division. Forget finding the business
best-seller list in these libraries. “I try to vary my reading diet and
ensure that I read more fiction than nonfiction,” Mr. Moritz said. “I
rarely read business books..." Favourites: T. E. Lawrence’s ‘Seven
Pillars of Wisdom,’ Machiavelli’s “The Prince.”, Omar Khayyam’s
“Rubáiyát,”
book_reviews  CEOs  reading  books  collectors  fiction  critical_thinking  strategic_thinking  personal_libraries  poets  Michael_Moritz  Ogilvy_&_Mather  mentoring  Niccolò_Machiavelli 
november 2009 by jerryking

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