recentpopularlog in

jerryking : ottawa   31

After the SNC-Lavalin affair, we must strip the influence of political staffers - The Globe and Mail
Omer Aziz was a policy adviser to the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

From the outside, our government is a democracy with duly elected parliamentarians. From the inside, it can feel like an autocracy, with power concentrated in very few hands. There is a single node of power and all the channels run through it. That’s why the Prime Minister’s Office is colloquially referred to as “the Centre.”....At Global Affairs Canada, political staffers meet regularly with stakeholders, including human-rights groups, corporate representatives and anyone else who might be affected by our policies, and signals regularly came from above on how to manoeuvre on a certain file. If a message comes from “the Centre” to your office, you can bet that everyone will drop everything and make sure they are meeting expectations. Refuse, and well – these people hold your future in their hands.

It would be no stretch to say that most of the important decisions made by the Canadian government are made by only a handful of people. This has led to preventable errors and bad policy outcomes such as Justin Trudeau’s India trip or the SNC-Lavalin affair. As with too much accumulated wealth, too much accumulated power is ultimately bad for democracy.

There are more than 600 political staffers in Ottawa. These jobs are not publicly advertised and are notoriously difficult to come by if you’re not already well-connected. It’s no wonder that diversity is such a problem in government – and this includes viewpoint diversity as much as ethnic and racial diversity.

Pull back the curtain and it turns out the people in the backrooms mostly resemble one another. Within the political staff itself, there exists a hierarchy, with senior staffers in the Prime Minister’s Office at the top. This is where the real decisions are made.

We need to seriously scale back the influence of political staffers and legislate what the parameters of their jobs really are......The biggest problem with concentrating political power is that it leads to hubris and arrogance, and eventually to critical errors. It leads people to believe that they can overstep boundaries in the name of the Boss.

Absolute power not only corrupts, it is fundamentally corrupting to the entire operation. This is not how a parliamentary system of government is supposed to work. These people are not the mafia. The government does not belong to them.

We could cut the number of staffers in half and Ottawa would run better than it does now. There should also be a formal, publicly acknowledged policy process so Canadians can trust that the system of democracy is working from within and decisions that might shape the future of the country for decades are not being made by a cloistered elite.
centralization  Ottawa  PMO  political_power  SNC-Lavalin  politicians  political_staffers  Canada  Canadian  government  institutions  partisanship  GoC 
february 2019 by jerryking
Intellectual maestro craves connections as NACO’s music director - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT EVERETT-GREEN
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 27 2015,

The energetic Englishman’s conversation, during a short visit to Toronto, is full of the language of linkage and cross-reference. Just about everything good can be made better, in his view, if the connections between things, people and ideas are stronger... if classical music isn’t reaching parts of the population, he says, it’s because those who perform aren’t doing enough to make links between the music, its history and the way we live today. “I only really connect to a piece of music when I read around it, I mean the broad social context.”

Connecting dots is a familiar theme in the arts and in arts promotion these days, but Shelley is quite willing to chase it into the corners, as they say in hockey. ....tell a compelling story which helps to solve a problem (Daniel Doctoroff--Bloomberg's guy)
music  Communicating_&_Connecting  Ottawa  cultural_institutions  connecting_the_dots  artists  orchestras_&_symphonies  classical_music  CEOs  sense-making  contextual  cross-pollination  interconnections 
march 2015 by jerryking
In the push to get back to black, don’t ignore the economy - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 19 2015 | The Globe and Mail | KONRAD YAKABUSKI.

Rather than worrying about whether Ottawa will be slightly in the red or slightly in the black over the next few years, the questions Canadians should be asking are the following: Is a smaller federal government good for the country if it means reduced services and the gutting of federal institutions? And do the Tories have an economic action plan that does not rely on a global commodities supercycle to underwrite growth?
cutbacks  Konrad_Yakabuski  Jim_Flaherty  Ottawa  public_sector  policy  budgets  Joe_Oliver  commodities_supercycle  austerity 
january 2015 by jerryking
The year in review: Canadians’ capital courage - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Dec. 29 2014

In the aftermath of the attack, Canadians wondered how long it would take the country to return to normal. The real answer was, About three seconds, or whatever time it took for six people to rush in the direction of gunfire to help a wounded stranger....Canada’s greatest strengths are its compassion, freedom and proven courage. Those six in Ottawa who ran to Nathan Cirillo’s aid had no idea whether they were in equal danger, but they didn’t stop to think about it. Ms. Winters, Margaret Lehre, Martin Magnan, Kyle Button, Conrad Mialkowski and Tom Lawson have since become friends. They get together when they can. They don’t grandstand. They feel sad they couldn’t do more. They look out for each other. It is these qualities that will best guide Canada as it struggles through this peculiar age.
inspiration  editorials  Ottawa  Nathan_Cirillo  War_Memorial  heroes  terrorism  lone_wolves  strengths  home_grown  self-radicalization 
december 2014 by jerryking
Canada’s best response: Move forward - The Globe and Mail
WESLEY WARK
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Oct. 22 2014

But the public should not be passive onlookers. The consistent messaging from countries more accustomed to such attacks revolves around a key ingredient: societal resilience. Democratic societies must not get bent out of shape – restoration of normalcy and confidence that ordinary life can continue is key to moving forward and avoiding responses that we may later regret. Catch the perpetrators, apply our tough existing legal sanctions, mourn the victims, learn the lessons, improve and refocus our intelligence efforts, but take a deep breath and practise normalcy. That's the best response.
security_&_intelligence  terrorism  attacks  Ottawa  next_play 
november 2014 by jerryking
What unfolded during the attack in Ottawa - The Globe and Mail
KATHRYN BLAZE CARLSON, KIM MACKRAEL AND BILL CURRY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Oct. 22 2014
heroes  Ottawa  terrorism  Parliament  House_of_Commons  home_grown  self-radicalization 
november 2014 by jerryking
Grieving soldiers resume their watch, vowing ‘we will carry on’ - The Globe and Mail
KATHRYN BLAZE CARLSON AND KIM MACKRAEL
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 24 2014
heroes  Canadian  Ottawa  tragedies 
november 2014 by jerryking
You can’t just denounce Ottawa - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 29 2014
aboriginals  Ottawa 
august 2014 by jerryking
Why Canada’s tech companies fail - The Globe and Mail
RICHARD BLACKWELL

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Apr. 10 2014,

Missing in Canada, though, are advanced skills related to intellectual property rights. At companies, sophisticated IPR capacity is a “precondition to commercially scaling innovative technologies,” he said, noting only U.S., Japanese and South Korean companies have been among the top patent filers in the United States. BlackBerry is the only Canadian company in the top 100.

Mr. Balsillie said Apple Inc. and Google Inc. spend more on acquiring intellectual property rights than they do on research and development.

IPR skills are crucial if Canadian companies are to compete internationally, he said, or else they will end up as a “lambs for slaughter” in the global marketplace. “They will never grow and Canada will continue to fall behind at a [national] level.”

In an interview after his speech, Mr. Balsillie said Ottawa’s role should be to “sophisticatedly understand how the game is played, particularly in the U.S. and Europe, and make sure that companies are trained to thrive in the game.”

He said currently there are no professors in Canada teaching the global patent system in law, business or engineering schools, and there is no training in the subject in the civil service.

Intellectual property is so important, Mr. Balsillie said, that bilateral issues concerning IPR will eventually overtake traditional trade irritants between countries.
failure  Canada  start_ups  technology  Jim_Balsillie  intellectual_property  scaling  patents  property_rights  protocols  Canadian  industrial_policies  Ottawa  rules_of_the_game  civil_service  UpSpark  sophisticated  bilateral  competitive_strategy 
april 2014 by jerryking
‘Cyberwar’ allegations threaten rift between Brazil and Canada
Oct. 07 2013 | The Globe and Mail | STEPHANIE NOLEN, COLIN FREEZE AND STEVEN CHASE.
Martin Rudner, a former Carleton University professor, said Canadian defence ministers have spent decades directing CSEC to collect foreign intelligence – including intelligence acquired through economic espionage.

He said Brazil could be a long-term strategic target, given its emerging oil resources could potentially cut into the market for Alberta oil. Probing the Brazilian energy ministry’s data would be one way for Ottawa to figure out the scale of that economic threat, Mr. Rudner said.

According to the Fantastico exposé, CSEC may have been trying to hack into an encrypted government server in Brazil that hosts correspondence between government officials and corporations. “These are state conversations, government strategies which no one should be able to eavesdrop upon,” Brazilian Energy Minister Edison Lobao was quoted as saying.

The leaked documents – all stamped “CSEC – Advanced Network Tradecraft”– yield intriguing glances into the previously unexplored world of Canadian cyberespionage, a world where disparate bits of data are painstakingly amassed in hopes of seeing what happens on a given “target’s” smarthphone or e-mail chains.
espionage  CSE  Brazil  cyber_warfare  cyber_security  Dilma_Rousseff  diplomacy  sigint  spycraft  Ottawa 
october 2013 by jerryking
Odds 'n Ends
January 15, 2001 | E-mail | by Owen Gordon.

I understand if you don‘t think it's worth the effort to Camp out and cold call - even though they seem to be developing enough of a concentration that U.S. VC's are setting up shop - but remotely monitoring Kanata to me would have meant chasing down a couple of locally-based service providers (HH's, lawyers, I-bankers, who operate in the space with their finger on the pulse or Denzil Doyle or a friend of one of your college buddies who works in industry down there or the Ottawa organizer of First Tuesdays or the TVG equivalent or the officer at the tech transfer office of U of O? Carleton? at least a ñfteen minute chat with some of the Ottawa-based correspondents from SVN on who would be a good source, etc. l Know it seems extremely ineftioient to you not to be able pour through a yellow-page listing with your exact criteria but you'd really be surprised at the randomness and uneveness of going through people. You start sniffing around and spreading the word for what you‘re looking for and you never know when you‘re just one introduction, one conversation away from the Sirois', Pacquins and Matthews of the world. After all, Canada ain't that big.
Owen_Gordon  advice  Managing_Your_Career  networking  randomness  Ottawa 
august 2012 by jerryking
Rod Bryden: Taking a shot at another entrepreneurial goal - The Globe and Mail
BARRIE McKENNA

OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jun. 08 2012
moguls  Canadian  Ottawa  entrepreneur  hockey 
june 2012 by jerryking
Top secret institute comes out of the shadows to recruit top talent
Sep. 05, 2011 | The Globe and Mail | Colin Freeze. While this
“signals-intelligence” agency has its own stable of hundreds of code
makers and code crackers, it often finds itself needing periodic
infusions of cutting-edge academic work to stay current. So, two years
ago, the CSEC hired Hugh Williams, who some describe as a “rock star”
mathematician at the University of Calgary, to lead the effort to put
together the Tutte Institute. Last year, the spy agency built a home for
the institute on its sprawling Ottawa campus.
mathematics  security_&_intelligence  CSE  cryptology  Colleges_&_Universities  espionage  talent  Ottawa  research  sigint 
october 2011 by jerryking
As boomer bureaucrats retire, savvy entrepreneurs rejoice - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 16, 2010 | Globe and Mail | MARY GOODERHAM. The exodus
within Canada’s public service, with more than a quarter of civil
servants retiring or preparing to leave jobs within the next few
years... is creating big opportunity for entrepreneurs...those who make
up Canada’s 8.5 per cent unemployment rate can’t easily replace retirees
leaving senior positions, especially within the public sector, as many
are young males who once worked in the manufacturing and construction
sectors....As a result, executive training programs are becoming
increasingly popular.
exodus  human_resources  baby_boomers  retirement  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  training  public_sector  civil_service  civil_servants  bureaucrats  Octothorpe_Software  Ottawa  training_programs 
december 2010 by jerryking
Trading places
January 2006 | Report on Business Magazine | by DOUG STEINER.
Ottawa needs a jolt of fresh financial thinking. Let's send in some
relief pitchers from Bay Street
Doug_Steiner  Ottawa  public_sector  Bay_Street  open_mind  finance  ideas  creativity  fresh_eyes 
february 2010 by jerryking
Innovation guru urges Ottawa on
Mar 29, 2004 | The Globe and Mail | by Simon Tuck.
Clayton Christensen, an innovation guru who teaches business
administration at Harvard University, told government officials that new
technologies and an open mind to the delivery of services can -- and
probably will -- help Canada reconcile its dilemma of escalating public
sector costs, combined with a determination to maintain services. too
many companies view their competitors as the other key players in their
sectors, instead of other products that compete to do the same job for
the customer. Research In Motion Ltd.'s BlackBerry, for example, may
compete more for the business traveller's spare time with newspapers,
magazines, and CNN's airport news than with other handheld device makers
such as Palm Inc. Poor market research contributes heavily to the fact
that about 75 per cent of new products fail, he said.
Clayton_Christensen  disruption  innovation  GoC  Canadian  government  market_research  ProQuest  Ottawa  open_mind  gurus 
january 2010 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read