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Business leaders are blinded by industry boundaries
April 22, 2019 | Financial Times | Rita McGrath.

Why is it so hard for executives to anticipate the major shifts that can determine the destiny of their organisations? Andy Grove called these moments “strategic inflection points”. For some, he wrote, “That change can mean an opportunity to rise to new heights. But it may just as likely signal the beginning of the end.”

Industry leaders would do well to focus on productive opportunities, even when they lie outside a fairly well-bounded industry. Want to survive a strategic inflection point? Stop focusing on traditional metrics and find new customer needs that your organisation can uniquely address.

Why do business leaders so often miss these shifts? Successful companies such as BlackBerry maker Research In Motion and Nokia did not heed the early signs of a move to app-based smartphones. Video rental chain Blockbuster failed to acquire Netflix when it had the chance, in 2000.

Senior people rise to the top by mastering management of the KPIs in that sector. This, in turn, shapes how they look at the world. The problem is a strategic inflection point can occur and render the reference points they have developed obsolete. Take traditional retail. Its key metrics have to do with limited real estate, such as sales per square metre. Introduce the internet and those measures are useless. And yet traditional systems, rewards and measures are all built around them.....British economist Edith Penrose grasped this crucial link, she asked, “What is an industry?” In her studies, executives did not confine themselves to single industries, they expanded into any market where their business might find profitable growth.

Consider the energy sector: Historically, most power generators and utilities were heavily regulated...The sector’s suppliers likewise expected steady demand and a quiet life....that business has been rocked by slow-moving shifts many players talked about, but did not act upon. The rise of distributed energy generation, the maturing of renewable technology, increased conservation and new rules have eroded the traditional model. Many failed to heed the warnings. In 2015, General Electric spent about $10bn to acquire Alstom’s power business. Finance chief Jeff Bornstein crowed at the time that it could be GE’s best acquisition ever. Blinded by traditional metrics, GE doubled down on fossil-fuel-fired turbines just as renewables were becoming cost competitive.

Consider razor blades: Procter & Gamble’s Gillette brand of razors had long enjoyed a competitive advantage. For decades, the company had invested in developing premium products, charged premium prices, invested heavily in marketing and used its clout to get those razors into every traditional retail outlet. A new breed of online rivals such as Dollar Shave Club and Harry’s have upended that model, reselling outsourced razors that were “good enough” and cheaper, online via a subscription model that attracted younger, economically pressured customers...... Rather than fork out for elaborate marketing, the upstarts enlisted YouTube and Facebook influencers to get the word out.
Andy_Grove  BlackBerry  blindsided  Blockbuster  brands  cost-consciousness  customer_insights  Dollar_Shave_Club  executive_management  GE  Gillette  good_enough  Harry's  industries  industry_boundaries  inflection_points  Intel  irrelevance  KPIs  metrics  millennials  movingonup  myopic  obsolescence  out-of-the-box  P&G  power_generation  retailers  reward_systems  sales_per_square_foot  shifting_tastes  slowly_moving  warning_signs 
april 2019 by jerryking
How to funnel capital to the American heartland
April 15, 2019 | Financial Times | by Bruce Katz.
* The Innovation Blind Spot, by Ross Baird.
* Ways must be found to rewire money flows in order to reverse the export of wealth
* A federal tax incentive intended to entice coastal capital into the heartland may end up helping to keep local capital local.

Over the past year, economically distressed communities across the US have been engaged in an intense discussion about mobilising private capital. Why? As mayors, governors, real estate developers, entrepreneurs and investors have learnt, buried in the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was a provision that created a significant tax incentive to invest in low-income “opportunity zones” across the country......the law’s greatest effect, ironically, has been to unveil a treasure trove of wealth in communities throughout the nation. Some of the country’s largest investors are high-net-worth families in Kansas City, Missouri, and Philadelphia; insurance companies in Erie, Pennsylvania, and Milwaukee; universities in Birmingham, Alabama, and South Bend, Indiana; philanthropists in Cleveland and Detroit; and community foundations and pension funds in every state.

These pillars of wealth mostly invest their market-oriented equity capital outside their own communities, even though their own locales often possess globally significant research institutions, advanced industry companies, grand historic city centres and distinctive ecosystems of entrepreneurs. The wealth-export industry is not a natural phenomenon; it has been led and facilitated by a sophisticated network of wealth management companies, private equity firms, family offices and financial institutions that have narrow definitions of where and in what to invest.

The US, in other words, doesn’t have a capital problem; it has an organisational problem. So how can capital flows be rewired to reverse the export of wealth?

Three things stand out:

(1) Information matters. The opportunity zones incentive has encouraged US cities to create investment prospectuses to promote the competitive assets of their low-income communities and highlight projects that are investor-ready and promise competitive returns.

(2) norms and networks matter. The opportunity zone market will be enhanced by the creation of “capital stacks” that enable the financing of community products such as workforce housing, commercial real estate, small businesses (and minority-owned businesses in particular) and clean energy, to name just a few. Initial opportunity zone projects are already showing creative blends of public, private and civic capital that mix debt, subsidy and equity.

(3) institutions matter. Opportunity zones require cities to create and capitalise new institutions that can deploy capital at scale in sustained ways. Some models already exist. The Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation, backed by patient capital from Procter & Gamble, has driven the regeneration of the Over-the-Rhine neighbourhood during the past 15 years.

More institutional innovation, however, is needed. As Ross Baird, author of The Innovation Blind Spot, has argued, the US must create a new generation of community quarterbacks to provide budding entrepreneurs with business planning and mentoring, matching them with risk-tolerant equity. These efforts will succeed if they unleash the synergies that flow naturally from urban density. New institutions will not have to work alone, but hand-in-glove with the trusted financial firms that manage this locally-generated wealth.
books  capital_flows  cities  coastal_elites  community  economic_development  economically_disadvantaged  economies_of_scale  high_net_worth  howto  industrial_policies  industrial_midwest  industrial_zones  institutions  investors  match-making  midwest  municipalities  networks  network_density  P&G  PPP  packaging  place-based  private_equity  property_development  prospectuses  Red_States  rescue_investing  rust_belt  tax_codes  venture_capital 
april 2019 by jerryking
Tristan Walker on the Roman Empire and Selling a Start-Up to Procter & Gamble - The New York Times
By David Gelles
Dec. 12, 2018

Tristan Walker founded Walker & Company, a maker of health and beauty products for people of color, in 2013. On Wednesday, the company was acquired by Procter & Gamble for an undisclosed sum. The deal represents a successful exit for Mr. Walker and his investors. It also signals an effort by Procter & Gamble, the maker of Gillette, to reach new markets with its shaving products. But while many start-up founders make a hasty exit after getting acquired, Mr. Walker is planning to stay on and grow Bevel, his men’s shaving brand, and Form, his women’s hair care brand. “We’re a team of 15 with very grandiose ambitions,” he said of Walker & Company, which is based in Palo Alto, Calif., but will move to Atlanta as part of the deal. “We want this company and its purpose to still be around 150 years from now.”

What’s that book you’ve got there?

It’s “Parallel Lives” by Plutarch. I’ve really been getting into Greek and Roman mythology. I’m reading something right now about the history of Rome during the 53 years when they really came into power, and this idea of the Roman state growing, the Greek state growing, and the differences therein fascinate me beyond belief. I’ve just been devouring it for the past few weeks now.

Walker attended the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Conn. And from there, he got to see how the other half lived. It completely changed his life. He got to see what success could look like. He got to see what wealth was. And it completely changed his worldview.

How so?

I would walk down the halls and see last names like Ford, go to some classes and realize they’re Rockefellers. These are names that were in my imagination. It taught me the importance of name and what that can mean, not only for you but your progeny. When I started at Hotchkiss, I didn’t know what a verb was. So I spent all of my time in the library studying. I spent all of my time thinking about what I wanted to be when I grew up.

What are your priorities as you keep building the company?

I’m dedicating my life to the demographic shift happening in this country. Not only for Silicon Valley. Not only for business. But for this country’s competitiveness. It’s changing. And folks need to respect that and they need to celebrate it.
African-Americans  Bevel  biographies  books  demographic_changes  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  exits  Form  insights  long-term  P&G  Romans  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  Tristan_Walker  wealth_creation  black-owned  brands  consumer_goods  personal_care_products  personal_grooming  founders 
december 2018 by jerryking
P&G Buys Walker & Co. to Expand Offerings to African-Americans - WSJ
By Aisha Al-Muslim
Dec. 12, 2018

Procter & Gamble Co. PG +0.19% has acquired Walker & Co. Brands as the consumer-products giant looks to serve more African-Americans with health and beauty products.

Palo Alto, Calif.-based Walker sells grooming products for men under the brand Bevel and hair-care products for women under the Form Beauty brand.

Walker will operate as a separate and wholly owned subsidiary of P&G, continuing to be led by its founder and Chief Executive Tristan Walker, ......Last year, Anglo-Dutch consumer products firm Unilever PLC acquired Sundial Brands, a New York-based hair-care and skin-care products company predominantly targeting African-Americans, for an undisclosed sum. Sundial’s brands include SheaMoisture, Nubian Heritage, Madam C.J. Walker and nyakio.
African-Americans  Bevel  black-owned  brands  exits  hair  P&G  personal_care_products  personal_grooming  Tristan_Walker  Unilever  founders 
december 2018 by jerryking
Technology has upended the world’s advertising giants - Mad men adrift
March 31st, 2018 | The Economist |

The world’s advertising giants are struggling to adapt to a landscape suddenly dominated by the duopoly of Google and Facebook. Some of their biggest clients, such as Procter & Gamble (P&G) and Unilever, are also being disrupted, in their case by smaller online brands and by Amazon. They are cutting spending on advertising services, and also building more capabilities in-house. Consultancies with digital expertise such as Deloitte and Accenture are competing with agencies, arguing that they know how to connect with consumers better, and more cheaply, using data, machine learning and app design.......This month Marc Pritchard, chief brand officer of P&G, criticised their (i.e. the ad giants) model as a “Mad Men” operation that is “archaic” and overly complex in an era when campaigns and ads need to be designed and refined quickly across lots of platforms.

Technological forces are buffeting this model.

(1) The first big challenge is disintermediation. Despite the growing backlash against the tech giants, Google and Facebook make it easy for firms big and small to advertise on their platforms and across the internet via their powerful ad networks.
(2) The second headache is the rise of ad-free content for consumers, especially on Netflix, and the corresponding disruption of ad-supported television, which has declining viewership globally.
(3) Third, Amazon’s e-commerce might, and the growing clout of internet-era direct-to-consumer upstarts, have weakened the distribution muscle and pricing power of the advertising giants’ biggest clients.....cost discipline among clients is driven partly by the influence of thrifty private-equity investors like 3G, the Brazilian owner of AB InBev, the world’s largest brewer......Sir Martin argues that the budgetary pressures that have forced his clients to cut back on advertising are a cyclical problem, not like the structural challenges posed by technological disruption.

In private, however, a senior executive at a rival ad-holding firm rejects much of this optimism. Technological disruption and disintermediation, he says, will only deepen. The efficiency of targeted digital ads means companies can spend less for the same outcome in branding. ....The advertising firms are responding by hiring away talent, acquiring businesses (in 2015 Publicis bought Sapient, a digital consultancy, for $3.7bn) and gradually changing how they make money. Their plans mostly boil down to two things: investing in digital services and consolidating their collections of businesses so that they can provide a range of services to one client more cheaply under one account.
advertising  economics  marketing  advertising_agencies  Martin_Sorrell  digital_strategies  WPP  Google  Facebook  Amazon  competitive_landscape  P&G  Unilever  disruption  Deloitte  Accenture  Publicis  Omnicom  via:sparkey  ad-tech  programmatic  direct-to-consumer 
april 2018 by jerryking
Big brands lose pricing power in battle for consumers
Save to myFT
Anna Nicolaou in New York and Scheherazade Daneshkhu in London 2 HOURS AGO

The product manufacturers are being squeezed by the big retailers — notably, Amazon and Walmart, which together sell $600bn worth of goods a year. Walmart has long put pressure on suppliers to cut prices. Amazon’s rise has exacerbated the “deflationary impact”, Société Générale says, creating a “much tougher environment in the US”. After Amazon bought Whole Foods in June, the price war grew more intense in groceries, pushing prices to historic lows that punished producers. 

Brand loyalty has suffered in the process. Equipped with the tools to compare prices online instantly, and bombarded with more choices, shoppers are growing more likely to opt for cheaper and discounted products — particularly in categories such laundry detergent and shampoo. To keep their spots on store shelves, brands are having to accept lower prices......Former Amazon employees say the company’s algorithms scan prices across competitors in real time, automatically adjusting its own so it can offer the lowest price. While most big brands have wholesale agreements with Amazon, third-party sellers are prolific on the site, complicating price control further. A 34oz bottle of P&G’s Pantene Pro-V Shampoo & Conditioner was listed by 10 different sellers — nine of them third parties — on the shopping site.

Amazon’s dominance makes it difficult for brands to abandon the platform, or try to sell directly on their own websites. “You have 200m customers on Amazon. If you walk away, there’s 200m people who are going to just buy from your competitors,” says James Thomson, a former Amazon manager who consults brands. “You’re probably not going to win.”

“This is a pretty dire situation,” he adds. “If brands are worried about meeting quarterly targets, they can’t afford to lose Amazon sales.”

Still, “the retailers have nothing to gain by pushing [consumer products makers] into bankruptcy”,
......Consumer goods companies have responded to the pricing pressures by aggressively cutting costs, led by the “zero-based budgeting” model of 3G Capital,
large_companies  Fortune_500  brands  CPG  pricing  price_wars  shareholder_activism  Amazon  P&G  Nestlé  win_backs  price-cutting  Nelson_Peltz  shifting_tastes  Colgate-Palmolive  upstarts  Unilever  zero-based_budgeting  3G_Capital  e-commerce  Mondelez  Big_Food 
february 2018 by jerryking
Produce or Else: Wal-Mart and Kroger Get Tough With Food Suppliers on Delays
Nov. 27, 2017 | WSJ | By Annie Gasparro, Heather Haddon and Sarah Nassauer

Grocers are giving food companies a tougher mandate: Ship on time, or pay the price.
Food retailers want their suppliers to resolve the persistent problem of delayed or incomplete deliveries, which they say costs them millions of dollars a year in lost sales and overtime pay.
Retailers used to give suppliers more leeway, since any number of factors—bad weather, a surge in demand, technology malfunctions—can foil deliveries of cereal, cheese, candy and other packaged goods from warehouses scattered around the country.
But now as traditional grocers battle Amazon.com<http://Amazon.com> Inc. and other online retailers that prioritize delivery speed, as well as price-cutting discounters, more are taking a strict line with suppliers, telling them on-time deliveries will translate directly into more sales and profits.
Delayed deliveries can leave holes on store shelves. Sales of some $75 billion a year are lost because products are out of stock or unsalable for other reasons, according to the Food Marketing Institute, a trade organization. That is about 10% of annual grocery sales industry-wide at a time when sales growth is hard to come by. “It’s a massive opportunity from a financial and customer standpoint,” .....The country’s biggest grocers are leading the charge. Kroger is fining suppliers $500 for every order that is more than two days late to any of its 42 warehouses, and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is charging suppliers monthly fines of 3% for deliveries that don’t arrive exactly on time, according to the retailers. They began issuing the fines in August........Wal-Mart has signaled it could do more than levy fines if problems persist. Charles Redfield, executive vice president of food for Wal-Mart U.S., told suppliers they could also lose shelf space if they don’t solve their delivery issues, according to people in attendance at a supplier meeting earlier this year. Retailers can threaten suppliers with loss of promotional space in stores, analysts said.....Packaged-goods companies are straining to keep up with the demands and remain in the good graces of retailers. They need GPS trackers and software to adjust routes in real time. Filling full orders fast is also challenging, since many manufacturers house items all over the country. That is particularly true for refrigerated items needing costly cold storage—which has fueled investments in more fulfillment centers......“Shipping complete orders on time is a completely reasonable request but turns out it’s harder than it sounds.”...
Wal-Mart  Kroger  grocery  supermarkets  supply_chains  retailers  delays  food  shipping  Amazon  cold_storage  penalties  delivery_times  fulfillment  CPG  Kraft_Heinz  P&G  on-time  shelf_space  supply_chain_squeeze 
november 2017 by jerryking
Procter & Gamble vs. Nelson Peltz: A Battle for the Future of Big Brands - WSJ
By Sharon Terlep
Oct. 8, 2017

Activist investor Nelson Peltz, who wants P&G to radically revise its strategy, argues the success of Ms. Francisco’s unit is the exception. He says the Cincinnati giant, hopelessly mired in the past, should shift to smaller, niche brands disconnected from its marquee products, pull in talent from the outside and split into three independent units.

“All the action today is local. It’s these small brands. It’s what the millennials want,” the 75-year-old investor said. “They want a brand with emotion, a brand that’s got a story behind it, a brand that brings value to the environment or is organic.”...P&G stands out as the largest company to face off against an activist investor.....

Many the world’s leading consumer-products companies, which once made the goods that stocked supermarket shelves the world over, have found it hard to adapt to rapidly shifting consumer tastes and the rise of smaller brands. The outcome of the Peltz-P&G battle will help determine the industry’s future direction.....P&G executives have transformed the company into a leaner organization. They say the future lies in the same fundamentals that guided the company for 180 years: huge brands such as Tide and Gillette that spin off products so effective they dominate their category.

“Declaring big brands dead and buried just because there is new media and a new generation is wrong,” said P&G’s lead independent director, Jim McNerney, the former chief executive of Boeing Co. and 3M Co. “Our new world is big brands presented in different ways through different media.”

Mr. McNerney argues that Mr. Peltz, who has had directorships at H.J. Heinz Co. and Oreo maker Mondelez International Inc., is trying to apply a formula that works in food, which is more susceptible to shifting consumer whims, but not for packaged goods such as diapers and dish soap.
P&G  brands  China  localization  shareholder_activism  Nelson_Peltz  shifting_tastes  CPG  emotional_connections 
october 2017 by jerryking
Hard sell for the ad men
| Financial Times |

Consumer goods groups are cutting costs amid slowing growth – the advertising industry is first to feel the pinch
CPG  cost-cutting  shareholder_activism  advertising  Big_Food  advertising_agencies  P&G  bots  marketing  budgets  Unilever  ABInBev  Mondelez  WPP  Interpublic  brands  Nestlé  slow_growth 
august 2017 by jerryking
The High Cost of Raising Prices - WSJ
By Andy Kessler
July 30, 2017

The more prices rise, the more customers bolt. It’s like running up a down escalator and never getting to the top. With the stock market hitting highs just about every day, investors need to be wary of companies that raise prices to make their numbers. These stocks make for spectacular sell-offs on even the slightest earnings miss......I had a friend who worked at General Electric for decades. He told me that in strategy sessions with his management, Jack Welch would constantly berate them, saying, “Any idiot can raise prices.” Except he used a stronger word than idiot to coax them into squeezing out costs, adding features, improving services and generally delighting customers. Contrast this with Berkshire Hathaway . Vice Chairman Charlie Munger found that with See’s Candies “we could raise prices 10% a year and no one cared. Learning that changed Berkshire.” .........There’s a long list of price bumpers. Walk down any supermarket aisle. Kellogg’s prices constantly snap, crackle and mostly pop. Procter & Gamble toothpaste sizes shrink faster than my cavity count, always less for the same price. Now private-equity firms are circling P&G. Same for Nestlé . Expect rising beer and liquor prices soon....Empires are lost on rising prices. Until recently, rather than innovate in mobile or cloud computing, Microsoft kept raising the price of its Windows operating system to computer manufacturers. Tablets and phones ate their lunch. Fees rose at eBay until Amazon took its growth away. .........Increasing prices attracts others to attack your market. Amazon’s Jeff Bezos warns: “Your margin is my opportunity.”....Competition solves much of this problem. Investors love protected businesses, but eventually relentless price increases kill them all. Consumers are the kangaroo at the bar in the old cartoon: The bartender says, “Say, we don’t get a lot of kangaroos in here.” The kangaroo replies, “No, and with these prices, I can see why!” Call me a kangaroo, but I prefer to invest in companies that lower prices and offer more.
Andy_Kessler  pricing  price_hikes  drawbacks  margins  Charlie_Munger  CPG  shareholder_activism  P&G  Nestlé  Kellogg  Jack_Welch  GE  large_companies  cost-cutting  Amazon  Jeff_Bezos  staying_hungry  delighting_customers  high-cost 
july 2017 by jerryking
From Diaper to Soda Makers, Big Brands Feel the Pinch of a Consumer Pullback - WSJ
By Sharon Terlep, Jennifer Maloney and Annie Gasparro
April 26, 2017

Some blamed the weak start of the year on higher gas prices, bad weather and other external factors, while other executives pointed to shifting consumer tastes. Analysts say some big brands, such as Gillette and Yoplait, are losing ground to upstarts. Overall purchases of consumer packaged goods in the U.S. declined 2.5% in unit terms in the first quarter, according to Nielsen.....consumers are cutting back purchases, aggressively seeking deals and drawing down supplies at home. At the same time, he said, a growing affinity for beards has played a big part in driving down razor sales, which contributed to a 6% organic sales decline for P&G’s grooming unit....PepsiCo, like big food rivals Kraft Heinz Co. and Nestlé, is struggling as consumers shift away from diet sodas and processed foods to fresher and healthier options. It has launched new products, such as a premium bottled water brand, to adjust to the shift.....For food and nonfood staples, big brands are struggling more than the overall industry. The 20 largest consumer packaged goods companies last year had flat sales while smaller ones posted sales growth of 2.4%, according to Nielsen.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc., meantime, has been reducing inventories and slashing prices as it fights to compete with Amazon.com Inc. and European discounters moving into the U.S. Those cuts are eating into its own profit and, in turn, leading the world’s biggest retailer to put pressure on its vendors.........The dynamics are driving tough choices for companies as they are forced to decide between reducing prices and ceding market share. PepsiCo and Coca-Cola Co. have been shrinking packages and raising prices.
brands  hard_choices  large_companies  volatility  P&G  Gillette  Yoplait  CPG  PepsiCo  healthy_lifestyles  Kraft_Heinz  Nestlé  Wal-Mart  Coca-Cola  price-cutting  price_hikes  Fortune_500  upstarts  supply_chain_squeeze  shifting_tastes  Amazon  Big_Food 
april 2017 by jerryking
Marketing in the Moments, to Reach Customers Online - The New York Times
JAN. 17, 2016 | NYT | By ROBERT D. HOF .

MOMENTS are having a moment in advertising. Or at least a micro moment.....It is not just a matter of reaching people at a particular time of day, a capability advertisers have employed for decades. Randy Wootton, chief executive of the ad technology firm Rocket Fuel, which recently announced a “marketing in the moment” approach, refers to ancient Greek concepts of time: chronos, or sequential time, and kairos, a moment of opportunity independent of linear time. The latter, of course, is the one his company claims to employ for marketers.

Another key, said Brian Solis, a principal analyst at Altimeter Group, a market research firm, is that the ads need to be more useful than they are attention-getting. According to a Google survey, 51 percent of smartphone owners have bought from a different company than they intended on the basis of information found online.....However, to build brands, an effort that accounts for the majority of ad spending, companies need more than a moment. And few marketers currently have all the skills needed for moments-based marketing, such as ethnographic studies of their customers and the ability to match customer data to the right context,
intentionality  immediacy  GPS  location_based_services  Greek  LBMA  advertising  instant_gratification  purchase_decisions  brands  branding  marketing  ephemerality  impulse_purchasing  contextual  Ram_Charan  P&G  real-time  Flybits  moments  linearity  seminal_moments  chronological  kairos 
february 2016 by jerryking
The Canadian connection to P&G’s 'Like a Girl' campaign - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 02 2015
Susan_Krashinsky  P&G  Super_Bowl  television  advertising  girls  daughters 
february 2015 by jerryking
The Big Mystery: What’s Big Data Really Worth? - The CFO Report - WSJ
October 13, 2014 | WSJ | By VIPAL MONGA.

“Data is worthless if you don’t know how to use it to make money,” said Laura Martin, an analyst with Needham & Co. Information on individual users loses value over time as they move or their tastes change, she added. That makes data a perishable commodity and more difficult to value at any given moment.
massive_data_sets  valuations  data  Kroger  monetization  Nestlé  P&G  Nielsen  perishables  commodities  shifting_tastes 
october 2014 by jerryking
Procter & Gamble to slim down product lineup
By CANDICE CHOI and MICHELLE CHAPMAN
— Aug. 1, 2014

The world's largest consumer products maker said it will jettison more than half its brands around the globe over the next year or two, leaving it with about 70 to 80 of its top performers when the nips and tucks are complete. The maker of CoverGirl, Pampers and Tide declined to specify what exactly it will shed but noted they're smaller brands that collectively account for less than 10 percent of sales.
P&G  brands  consumer_goods 
august 2014 by jerryking
Pulling More Meaning from Big Data
August 2013 | Retail Leader | By Ed Avis

"A.G. Lafley [Procter & Gamble's CEO] spoke of the two moments of truth," says John Ross, president of Inmar Analytics based in Winston-Salem, N.C. "The first occurs when a consumer buys a product, and the second when they use it. Much of the data today is about orchestrating and understanding those two moments. But two additional moments of truth are emerging to bookend Lafley's. One occurs when a consumer is planning to make a purchase. The other happens following use, when the consumer talks about his or her experience with the product. All of these activities leave a 'data wake' that describes how the consumer is moving down the path to purchase." (jk: going to assume that data wake = exhaust data).

Like most consumer packaged goods companies, Procter & Gamble relies on data to determine what consumers are looking for. "Consumer insight is at the core of our business model. We approach every brand we make by asking the question, 'What do people really need and want from this product? What does this mean to their lives?' Let me be clear – this is not casual observation. We employ teams of behavioral scientists, researchers, psychologists, even anthropologists to uncover true insight based on intensive research and exploration," said Marc Pritchard, P&G's global marketing and brand building officer, speaking at the Association of National Advertisers' 2012 Annual Conference....Most firms haven't advanced beyond localized analytics and don't fully capitalize on the existing data they have at hand – such as POS data, loyalty club data and social media traffic – according to a 2012 Deloitte study for the Grocery Manufacturers Association.
massive_data_sets  Sobeys  grocery  supermarkets  Safeway  P&G  A.G._Lafley  Kroger  point-of-sale  loyalty_management  customer_insights  insights  CPG  exhaust_data  psychologists  psychology  anthropologists  anthropology  ethnography  behavioural_science  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  data  information_sources  moments  moments_of_truth 
december 2013 by jerryking
To Persuade People, Tell Them a Story - WSJ.com
Nov. 9, 2013 | WSJ | By Dennis Nishi.

"Lead With a Story: A Guide to Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, and Inspire.

* Use far fewer slides. Use a lot more anecdotes
* Turn presentations into stories that your audience can relate to, instead of lecturing them on what needs changing.
* Judge performance on the quality of questions being asked and the quality of feedback received.
* Being an effective storyteller requires preparation.
* Move beyond facts and figures, which aren't as memorable as narratives, says Cliff Atkinson, author of "Beyond Bullet Points."
* Many people in business think raw data is persuasive. But when you're dealing with people from other departments and in different fields who don't understand how you got that data, you can lose them pretty quickly. * Step back and put yourself into their shoes and take them through the process of understanding," "Distill the most important facts and wrap them in an engaging story."
* Find ways to connect with your audience on an emotional level, Neuroscientists have discovered that most decisions—whether people realize it or not—are informed by emotional responses. Do legwork to find significant events in your audience's lives or your own that you can base your story on or use to reinforce your points.
* Insert anecdotes about taking care of a sick family member or a memorable customer story, says Mr. Smith, author of "Lead With a Story: A Guide to Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, and Inspire."
* Organize your story into three acts and starting by establishing context. You want to let your audience know who the main characters are, what the background of the story is, and what you'd like to accomplish by telling it, he says. Open, for example, by describing a department that's consistently failed to meet sales goals.
* Move on to how your main character—you or the company—fights to resolve the conflicts that create tension in the story. Success may require the main character to make additional capital investments or take on new training. Provide real-world examples and detail that can anchor the narrative, he advises.
* The ending should inspire a call to action, since you are allowing the audience to draw their own conclusions about your story versus just telling them what to do. Don't be afraid to use your own failures in support of your main points.
* Whatever you do, don't preface your story with an apology or ask permission to tell it. Be confident that your story has enough relevance to be told and just launch into it. Confidence and authority, he says, help to sell the idea to your audience.
storytelling  presentations  Communicating_&_Connecting  persuasion  books  P&G  howto  pitches  buy-in  large_companies  emotional_commitment  narratives  self-confidence  preparation  empathy  seminal_moments  contextual  think_threes  anecdotal 
november 2013 by jerryking
She wants to clean up the oil sands, in a non-toxic fashion - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 26 2013 | Globe and Mail | MARJO JOHNE.

Marlene Luck, president of Northern Canadian Supplies Ltd. in Fort McMurray, Alta., has big plans for her business, which sells environmentally friendly cleaning supplies and equipment, and safety work gear such as fire resistant clothing and hard hats, to schools, hospitals and seniors residences.

Since its launch eight years ago, Northern Canadian Supplies, which has eight employees and $616,000 in annual revenue, has expanded into Saskatchewan and British Columbia and has built warehouses in five Canadian cities. Its product catalogue is now 1,700 pages thick and includes brands from global giants such as Procter & Gamble and 3M.
aboriginals  small_business  green  consumer_goods  women  environmentally_friendly  P&G  3M  non-toxic  oil_sands  environmental_services 
june 2013 by jerryking
Africa calling
March 10, 2013 | FT.com | By William Wallis.

African entrepreneurs pre-empted this interest. One of the first deals that Mr Karim pulled off, acquiring the west African franchise for Costain, a UK construction group, speaks volumes about the changing times. Like other European contractors, the company was facing intense competition from Chinese rivals. When Mr Karim placed his offer, Costain was also wrestling with increasingly stringent western transparency regulations, a predatory governing elite and threats from insurgents and kidnappers in the oil-producing Niger delta.

After buying the company’s assets, Mr Karim replaced costly expatriate managers and freed up colonial-era villas in Ikoyi – the perks of expatriate office – which he rented out. In a flash he had cash flow to refloat the business and leverage other ambitions. These have seen him launch a power generating company and in November acquire an oilfield – a totem for any successful Nigerian businessman – in a joint venture with UK wildcat explorer Heritage, from another European company under pressure to adapt: Royal Dutch Shell, the oil major.
Africa  entrepreneur  China  Wal-Mart  L’Oréal  P&G  Nigeria  Nigerians  cash_flows  Royal_Dutch_Shell 
march 2013 by jerryking
P&G, General Mills Tap Into Startups - WSJ.com
February 15, 2013 | WSJ | By LORA KOLODNY.

P&G, General Mills Tap Into Startups
Alliances With Crowdfunding Site CircleUp Allow Big Firms a New Look at Trends
Big_Food  P&G  General_Mills  consumer_goods  large_companies  start_ups  crowd_funding 
february 2013 by jerryking
Five savvy questions for strategic success
Feb. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail |HARVEY SCHACHTER
Playing to Win
By A.G. Lafley and Roger Martin

(Harvard Business School Press, 260 pages, $30)
The strategy worked, by satisfying the five questions:

* Winning aspirations. Most companies have lofty mission statements but the authors say that isn’t the same thing as having a strategy. It’s a starting point, statements of an ideal future.
* Where to play. In which markets and with which customers is it best to compete? This is a vital question, because you can’t be all things to all people if you want to be successful.

* How to win.After selecting the playing field, you must choose the best approach, which the authors stress might be very different from your competitors.
* Core capabilities. What capabilities must be in place for your organization to win?
* Management systems. What needs to be in place in your management approach to support the strategy, and measure how successful you are with it
Harvey_Schachter  Roger_Martin  questions  book_reviews  P&G  A.G._Lafley  strategy  mission_statements  ambitions  internal_systems  core_competencies  Instrumentation_monitoring  measurements  books  capabilities 
february 2013 by jerryking
Listening Begins at Home
November 2003 | HBR | by James R. Stengel, Andrea L Dixon,and Chris T.Allen
listening  P&G  HBR  marketing  career_paths  employee_engagement 
august 2012 by jerryking
Amazon to Buy Diapers.com, Soap.com Owner Quidsi - WSJ.com
November 8, 2010 | WSJ | By GEOFFREY A. FOWLER And ELLEN BYRON
Amazon Expands in Bulk With Diapers, Soap Deal
Quidsi  Amazon  e-commerce  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  P&G  CPG  household_products  Zappos 
july 2012 by jerryking
Retailers Reach Out With Smartphone Apps - WSJ.com
April 21, 2010 | WSJ | By GEOFFREY A. FOWLER.
Retailers Reach Out on Cellphones
Software Apps Provide Shoppers With Rewards to Help Lure Them Into Stores
smartphones  mobile_applications  retailers  FourSquare  Loopt  Shopkick  Kraft  P&G 
june 2012 by jerryking
P&G's $3 Billion Sideline - WSJ.com
March 20, 2012 | WSJ | By EMILY GLAZER.

Procter & Gamble Co. PG -0.75% has been licensing out hundreds of undeveloped patents, brands and rights to new products as it tries to turn around some languishing businesses and extend successful ones. The little-known practice includes brands such as Febreze, Pampers Kandoo, Mr. Clean and others....P&G ramped up its licensing efforts—often partnering with smaller companies—after discovering that the side business had been generating significant revenue. P&G says it didn't even calculate how much its external partners were bringing in from P&G products until three years ago. When it did, the answer was a surprise—$3 billion in each of the past three years.
P&G  outlicensing  partnerships 
june 2012 by jerryking
The creative future
Aug 1, 2005 | Business Week pg. 72 | By Bruce Nussbaum, Robert Berner and Diane Brady of BusinessWeek
design  P&G  GE  Swiffer  Jeffrey_Immelt 
may 2012 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: The hunger game
April 27, 2012 | Report on Business | ERIC REGULY.
Bill Gates's recipe for boosting world food output may fatten Big Ag's bottom line, but what about small farmers?

The International Fund for Agricultural Development.

The problem is that there is ample evidence that the yield gains GM seeds produce are somewhere between overblown and negligible in many cases, and that GM foods have unknown effects on human and animal health because they haven't been subjected to long-term independent studies.

Problem: Smallholder farmers in developing countries who supply offshore corporations won't necessarily grow the diversity of crops needed by local populations. And farmers who depend on one crop are more vulnerable to financial ruin if a new disease, fungus or pest hits. Many small farms also don't earn enough income to pay for GM seeds and specialized crop-protection goop to go with those seeds.
billgates  Gates_Foundation  genetically_modified  Eric_Reguly  agriculture  productivity  farming  Monsanto  philanthropy  Nestlé  P&G  smallholders 
april 2012 by jerryking
The Vanishing Mass Market
July 12, 2004 | BW Online | Anthony Bianco.

P&G now is standing mass marketing on its head by shifting emphasis from selling to the vast, anonymous crowd to selling to millions of particular consumers. "You find the people. You are very focused on them," Stengel says. "You become relevant to them."..."We are a big marketer," says M. Lawrence Light, McDonald's chief marketing officer, echoing Stengel's disavowals. "We are not a mass marketer."

For marketers, the evolution from mass to micromarketing is a fundamental change driven as much by necessity as opportunity...Figuring out the right way to send the right message to the right person at the right time is difficult work. It is also risky, not unlike hunting game birds with a high-powered rifle instead of a shotgun. If you miss, you miss entirely.
marketing  P&G  micro-markets  permission_marketing  target_marketing  advertising  niches  McDonald's  personalization  Jim_Stengel  the_right_people 
april 2012 by jerryking
Ex-Goldman Director Faces New Insider Trading Claim - NYTimes.com
April 16, 2012, 4:15 pmLegal/Regulatory
Ex-Goldman Director Faces New Insider Trading Claim
By PETER LATTMAN

Rajat K. Gupta, the former director of Goldman Sachs and Procter & Gamble who is accused of leaking secret corporate information to the convicted hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam, faces a new insider-trading claim.

In a letter filed with the court, the government accused Mr. Gupta of leaking to Mr. Rajaratnam sales forecasts for Procter & Gamble in late 2008.

Mr. Gupta tipped Mr. Rajaratnam off about “P.& G.’s organic sales growth forecast for the October-to-December quarter prior to P.& G.’s public announcement on or about Dec. 11, 2008,” said the letter, which was made public on Monday.
Rajat_Gupta  insider_trading  P&G  Raj_Rajaratnam 
april 2012 by jerryking
P&G's Marketing Chief Looks to Go Digital - WSJ.com
March 13, 2012 | WSJ | By EMILY GLAZER.
P&G's Marketing Chief Looks to Go Digital
P&G  digital_media  interviews 
march 2012 by jerryking
Going Mop Head to Mop Head on the Floor - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 1, 2012 | WSJ | By ANNE MARIE CHAKER.
Going Mop Head to Mop Head on the Floor
Rival Cleaners With New Features Take On the Popular Swiffer Line; One Sweeper Talks Trash
P&G  Rubbermaid 
february 2012 by jerryking
Former P&G CEO Smale Dies
NOVEMBER 20, 2011 | WSJ |By ASSOCIATED PRESS
P&G  obituaries  CEOs 
november 2011 by jerryking
U.S. Targets Insider Culture in Gupta Case - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 27, 2011 | WSJ | By MICHAEL ROTHFELD, SUSAN PULLIAM and S. MITRA KALITA. Gupta Case Targets Insider Culture
Gupta Indictment Shows New Twist in Crackdown; Case Is Gamble for Prosecutors
McKinsey  insider_trading  SEC  Wall_Street  prosecutors  Rajat_Gupta  P&G  Goldman_Sachs  Preet_Bharara  Department_of_Justice 
october 2011 by jerryking
How to Be Like Apple - WSJ.com
AUG. 29, 2011 | WSJ | RACHEL EMMA SILVERMAN. Driving
Innovation: Mgmt. experts say there are specific ways firms can generate
and execute new ideas. Solicit input. Great ideas come from all levels
of the organization, not just the top. Provide workers time for
"unofficial activity," set time to work on creative ideas. Executing
ideas is often tougher than generating them. Companies need a clear
process to prioritize, resource & test ideas quickly and cheaply, so
that they can afford to experiment...Observation can help companies
understand not just what people say they want, but what they really
need. Clay Christensen says P&G's new-product success rate in recent
yrs. came from observing that people were concerned about how their
clothes smell (Febreze) & were always looking for simpler ways to
clean the floor (Swiffer.). P&G overhauled its new-biz strategy
after realizing that just 15% of its ideas, developed in more of an
ad-hoc approach, were meeting revenue & profit targets.
Apple  innovation  execution  Vijay_Govindarajan  P&G  business_development  Clayton_Christensen  new_products  kill_rates  success_rates  systematic_approaches  ad_hoc  new_businesses  slack_time  companywide  observations  experimentation  primary_field_research  large_companies  Fortune_500  brands  unarticulated_desires  Michael_McDerment  ideas  idea_generation  process-orientation 
august 2011 by jerryking
In a Shift, Marketers Beef Up Ad Spending Inside Stores - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 21, 2005 | WSJ | By EMILY NELSON and SARAH
ELLISON....Some stores charge marketers a fee for in-store displays --
as if they were selling space on a roadside billboard. Others don't have
the clout or think they will be compensated through the overall boost
to sales. Those that charge face another wrinkle: there's no standard
system for measuring the audience for in-store ads and therefore no easy
way to charge for the space. The fees for each project are negotiated
on a case-by-case basis, a time-consuming task.

Ideas for Asif and LBMA as well as Turnstyle. Help stores monetize their 3rd party in-store advertising opportunities.
digital_signage  P&G  marketing  in-store  advertising_agencies  market_research  LBMA 
august 2011 by jerryking
In Tide Dry Cleaners, a Laundry Room Staple Expands - NYTimes.com
By ANDREW MARTIN
Published: December 8, 2010

Where other dry cleaning entrepreneurs have tried to come up with clever
business models for dry cleaning, P.& G.’s primary innovation is in
the brand name itself: Tide Dry Cleaners, named after its best-selling
laundry detergent.

With more than 800,000 Facebook fans and legions of loyal customers,
Tide will draw people into the franchise stores, and superior service —
which includes drive-through service, 24-hour pickup and cleaning
methods it markets as environmentally safer — will keep them coming
back, company officials predict.
dry-cleaning_industry  P&G  jck  drive-throughs  customer_loyalty 
august 2011 by jerryking
The New Dirt on Dry Cleaners - WSJ.com
JULY 28, 2011 | WSJ | by RAY A. SMITH. A transition that is
already shaking up the dry-cleaning industry. Many dry cleaners will be
required to find new solvents to replace a widely used cleaning agent
called perchloroethylene, or perc, by 2020. As a result, businesses are
using a growing array of new methods to clean garments. Procter &
Gamble Co. recently launched Tide Dry Cleaners, a chain of stores that
use an alternative product, based on silicone and called
GreenEarth....The shakeup is coming to an industry that has changed
little for decades. ...Tide Dry Cleaners stores, which use the branding
of Tide laundry detergent, have valets that carry clothes to and from
customers' cars, lockers with customized passwords where consumers can
drop off or pick up clothes after hours, and bar codes that keep track
of customers' data, including preferences. The company made sure the
stores were bright and open, with the machines visible,
laundry_rooms  P&G  dry-cleaning_industry  product_launches 
july 2011 by jerryking
Gillette's in Razors: the 11-Cent Blade - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 1, 2010 | WSJ | By ELLEN BYRON.Winning over
low-income consumers in developing markets is crucial to the growth
strategy of P&G's chief executive, Robert McDonald. Over the next
five years, Mr. McDonald wants to boost the company's total customer
base for its many products to five billion of the world's expected
population of seven billion. Many of these new consumers will have to
come from markets like India, where P&G has a small presence
compared to Unilever PLC and some other competitors.The need to grow in
emerging markets is pushing P&G to change its product-development
strategy. P&G uses what it calls reverse engineering. Rather than
create an item and then assign a price to it—as in most developed
markets—the company starts with what consumers can afford and then
adjusts the features and manufacturing processes to meet the target.

For Gillette Guard, the target was five rupees, about the cost of
shampoo sachets or small tubes of toothpaste.
Gillette  innovation  India  P&G  personal_care_products  reverse_engineering  reverse_innovation  cost-cutting  emerging_markets  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  customer_growth  low-income 
october 2010 by jerryking
How can I help you? Jim Stengel is head of marketing for Procter & Gamble, the world's biggest advertiser.
Feb 4, 2006 | Financial Times pg. 16 | GARY SILVERMAN. P&G
is trying to gain the attention of consumers through deeds - offering
advice, doing favours and displaying the kind of cultural empathy you
would expect of a charity or a religious organisation.
P&G  advertising  advertising_agencies  customer_focus  customer_centricity 
june 2010 by jerryking
YourEncore Keeps Retirees in the Game
April 15, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Laura Lallos. Account
managers for the Web-based service recruit the best scientists and
engineers for member companies' ad hoc projects
retirement  management_consulting  Second_Acts  P&G  IBM  Eli_Lilly  General_Mills  ad_hoc  job_search  JCK 
april 2010 by jerryking
Bottom line on PR: It works, says P&G
Jack Neff. Advertising Age. (Midwest region edition). Chicago:
Nov 7, 2005. Vol. 76, Iss. 45; pg. 0_1, 2 pgs
Procter & Gamble Co. has developed an analytic tool to quantify the
sales impact of public relations-giving PR high marks and boosting
prospects for a discipline whose relative lack of financially measurable
returns has long held its growth in check.
ProQuest  P&G  public_relations  analytics 
march 2010 by jerryking
P&G Razor Launches in Recession's Shadow - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 12, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by ELLEN BYRON
P&G  innovation 
february 2010 by jerryking
Think Small - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 14, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by RAJAN
VARADARAJAN. Article touting the merits of incremental--versus
radical-- approaches to innovation. Incremental innovations can: help
support radical innovations; play a major role in helping companies
enter new markets, by modifying existing products to suit new customers;
help take charge of fragmented industries -- those with lots of small,
regional competitors; help companies on their home turf (i.e. line
extensions); help a company increase the price premium on its products;
help companies neutralize the impact of competitors' innovations; help
companies respond to big changes in their industry.
innovation  radical  P&G  incrementalism  breakthroughs  fragmented_markets  small_wins  structural_change  taxonomy  new_markets  marginal_improvements  quick_wins 
january 2010 by jerryking
FT.com / UK - Sharp focus gives design group the edge
February 18 2005 | Financial Times | By Scott Morrison. What
sets Ideo apart from most design companies is that it begins every
project by focusing on the consumer experience - whether it is asked to
design a product, a store or a service. This is where the group's
so-called "human factors" team comes in: shadowing consumers, taking
pictures of them as they use or buy products and interviewing them to
evaluate their experiences. "We are looking to design a better consumer
experience,"..."We want to know what is going right and what is wrong."
Ideo says it is selling more than just hot product designs. By drawing
clients into the design process, it is trying to teach them to think
differently and show them how to shake up their own internal design
processes.
ideo  design  customer_experience  P&G  AT&T  Ford_Motor_Co.  human_factor  primary_field_research  think_differently 
january 2010 by jerryking
Green-Products Makers Crank Up Marketing - WSJ.com
JANUARY 11, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by ELLEN BYRON And
SUZANNE VRANICA. Some leading makers of environmentally friendly
household products are boosting their marketing firepower, mounting a
broader challenge to manufacturers of mainstream consumer goods by
launching major marketing campaigns, introducing new products and
upgrading their management teams with consumer-product industry
veterans. These firms compete with the likes of P&G and the Reckitt
Benckiser Group.
Seventh_Generation  Method_Products  green  consumer_goods  environmentally_friendly  P&G  new_products  CPG 
january 2010 by jerryking
Switch to the low-income customer
14-Nov-2005 | Financial Times | By Jeremy Grant. "When AG
Lafley came in [in 2000] and said, 'We're going to serve the world's
consumers', that led us to say, 'We don't have the product strategy, the
cost structure, to be effective in serving lower income consumers'.
"What's happened in the last five years has been one of the most
dramatic transformations I've seen in my career. We now have all of our
functions focused on that," says Mr Daley. P&G, the world's largest
consumer goods company, devotes about 30 %of its $1.9bn in annual
research and development spending to low-income markets, a 50 % increase
from 5 yrs. ago. Consumer research: spend time in consumers' homes to
gain insights into daily habits; Cost innovation: use proprietary
technology to design low-income products; Innovation productivity: use
"matchmakers" such as InnoCentive; Manufacturing efficiency: cut mfg.
costs by developing a network of suppliers in China, Brazil, Vietnam and
India.
P&G  BRIC  market_research  consumer_research  primary_field_research  customer_insights  innovation  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  A.G._Lafley  InnoCentive  supply_chains  China  Brazil  Vietnam  India  observations  insights  cost-structure  jugaad  proprietary  behavioural  cost-cutting  match-making  CPG  low-income 
december 2009 by jerryking
Active inertia is the enemy of survival
Oct 8, 2009 | Financial Times pg. 16 | Book review by Richard
Donkin of Donald Sull's The Upside of Turbulence ; Seizing Opportunity
in an Uncertain World ; Harper Business, $27.99/pound(s)18.99. "the
risk, says Sull, is that complacency sets in as companies and their
bosses begin to believe their own press during the good times. The CEO
on the cover of a business magazine, a boss who looks like all the rest,
a grand headquarters - all are examples of companies resting on their
laurels.
Sull concentrates on building agility in business, allowing companies to
shift resources quickly from less promising to faster-growing areas.
Some companies, such as Johnson & Johnson, P & G and Samsung,
have cultivated portfolio agility at the heart of their businesses, he
says. Sull argues that the best companies are able to absorb the shocks
of market turbulence, using cash and profits from their strongest
business streams to cushion the effects of unforeseen events."
book_reviews  Donald_Sull  resilience  upside  turbulence  adversity  complacency  cost_of_inaction  inertia  Samsung  P&G  books  Johnson_&_Johnson  agility  uncertainty  unexpected  unforeseen  antifragility 
october 2009 by jerryking
Partnerships Based on Service, Not Size - NYTimes.com
By MICKEY MEECE
Published: April 29, 2009
major corporations, at some point, have a need for new, innovative
products and services because they can’t develop them all in-house,”
said John Howard, vice president for business development at eXpresso,
which offers an online service that allows people to store, edit and
share Microsoft Office documents.

“They look to start-ups for the next great things they want to add to
their product offerings.”Procter & Gamble, an $83.5 billion company,
began its Connect and Develop program about eight years ago, according
to Jeff LeRoy, external relations manager.
P&G  innovation  partnerships  small_business  large_companies  size  collaboration  joint_ventures  start_ups  in-house 
june 2009 by jerryking
Partnerships Based on Service, Not Size - NYTimes.com
By MICKEY MEECE
Published: April 29, 2009
major corporations, at some point, have a need for new, innovative
products and services because they can’t develop them all in-house,”
said John Howard, vice president for business development at eXpresso,
which offers an online service that allows people to store, edit and
share Microsoft Office documents.

“They look to start-ups for the next great things they want to add to
their product offerings.”Procter & Gamble, an $83.5 billion company,
began its Connect and Develop program about eight years ago, according
to Jeff LeRoy, external relations manager.
P&G  innovation  partnerships  small_business  large_companies  size  collaboration  joint_ventures  start_ups  in-house 
june 2009 by jerryking
How to Turn Trash Into Treasure - WSJ.com
April 13, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | By ELLEN BYRON. Under
pressure to deliver growth, a number of consumer-products titans,
including Procter & Gamble Co., Unilever and Colgate-Palmolive Inc.,
have been selling well-known but underperforming brands to better focus
on those with more potential. Smaller firms trying to play Dr.
Frankenstein have bought such familiar castoff brands as Sure and Right
Guard deodorants, Comet cleaner, Aqua Net styling products, Pert Plus
shampoo and Rit dye.
orphan_brands  resuscitation  marketing  consumer_goods  culling  P&G  Unilever  Colgate_Palmolive  CPG  divestitures  brands  under-performing  personal_care_products 
may 2009 by jerryking
What exactly are chief executives for?
May 15 2009 | Financial Times | By Stefan Stern. First,
making sure that the voice of the consumer is heard loudest and clearest
of all, above that of any other stakeholder. Second, deciding what
business you are in - and equally, what businesses you should not be in.
Third, balancing the need for performance in the short term with the
need to invest for the longer term. Fourth, the CEO has to shape values
and standards.
CEOs  executive_management  Stefan_Stern  HBR  P&G  organizational_culture  values 
may 2009 by jerryking
P&G's Lafley Sees CEOs as Links to Outside World - WSJ.com
MARCH 22, 2009, 8:59 P.M. ET| The Wall Street Journal | by ELLEN BYRON
leadership  CEOs  leaders  P&G 
march 2009 by jerryking
Virtual reality takes shoppers to another world | The Australian
October 19, 2006, The Australian, article by Alan Mitchell on how Procter & Gamble has stolen a march in the brands battle.
marketing  tools  innovation  market_research  virtual_reality  P&G  retailers  simulations 
march 2009 by jerryking
Mr. Clean Takes Car-Wash Gig - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 5, 2009, 9:49 A.M. ET WSJ article By ELLEN BYRON.
Procter & Gamble Co., under mounting pressure to find new sources of
revenue growth, is quietly experimenting with service businesses in
recent years. Car washing, dry-cleaning, and membership-based medical
services have all been looked at. Nathan Estruth, is the vice president
of P&G's FutureWorks, which develops new business ventures.
jck  automobile  business_development  competitive_advantage  P&G  car_washes  dry-cleaning_industry 
february 2009 by jerryking
P&G Lowers Sales Outlook as Pantries Become Leaner - WSJ.com
Clipped this for potential collaboration with Ram on project for Jaya
Jaya  marketing  P&G  projects 
december 2008 by jerryking

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