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Want to Future-Proof Your Career? Start by Reading These 10 Science-Fiction Books | Inc.com
July 18, 2017 | Inc. Magazine | By Jessica Stillman.

some of the smartest names in tech and entrepreneurship for a few recommendations to get you started:

(1) The Foundation Trilogy by Isaac Asimov. This recommendation comes from Elon Musk, who credits the trilogy with inspiring him to dream big and work hard in order to keep humans moving forward with technological progress.
(2) The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. This book is a favorite of both Richard Branson and Musk, who claims it taught him that "the question is harder than the answer."
(3) Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson. Reid Hoffman and Peter Thiel apparently spent a weekend discussing this highly influential novel before founding PayPal. It's also one of Sergey Brin's favorite books.
(4) Seveneves by Neal Stephenson. One of Bill Gates's favorite books, this massive novel about the imminent end of life on Earth "rekindled my love for sci-fi," says the billionaire, though he cautions that "some readers will lose patience with all the technical details."
(5) Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. This title is included in the MIT class mentioned above. Brueckner notes that "the devices [Dick] describes in his writings can be very humorous and satirical but are truly profound."
(6) Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. According to Mark Zuckerberg's early Facebook profile, this popular tale of a video game prodigy who gets involved in a real-life war is one of his favorites.
(7) The Three-Body Problem by Ci Xin Liu. A slightly more mature Zuckerberg included this one by a Chinese sci-fi author in his book club picks. It's the first of a trilogy.
(8) New York 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson. Peper's post is full of recommendations, including this one in which rising sea levels prompt "hedge fund managers and real estate investors to create a new intertidal market index. As climate change accelerates and the world economy becomes ever more concentrated in megacities, rethinking infrastructure becomes an ever more urgent priority."
(9) Change Agent by Daniel Suarez. Another Peper pick, this one explores the looming impacts of synthetic biology.
(10) The Last Firewall by William Hertling. VC's love sci-fi too. Brad Feld says his reading in the genre creates "a subconscious framework in my brain for a lot of the stuff I'm investing in." His blog is packed with recommendations, including this book, which he deems "spectacular."
billgates  books  Elon_Musk  future-proofing  novels  Peter_Thiel  Reid_Hoffman  science_fiction 
7 weeks ago by jerryking
Engaging with the world’s ills beats hiding in a bunker
OCTOBER 18, 2018 | Financial Times | Stephen Foley.

those with real ambition are not planning for a life underground down under. They are building philanthropic ventures to tackle the world’s ills, or striving to effect change through the political process, or starting new mission-driven businesses.

The bunker mentality is the polar opposite of the optimism displayed by the likes of Jeff Bezos, who set out his philanthropic credo in September alongside his plan to build a network of Montessori-inspired preschools across the US. He talked of his “belief in the potential for hard work from anyone to serve others”, from “business innovators who invent products that empower, authors who write books that inspire, government officials who serve their communities, teachers, doctors, carpenters, entertainers who make us laugh and cry, parents who raise children who go on to live lives of courage and compassion”.

“It fills me with gratitude and optimism,” he said, “to be part of a species so bent on self-improvement.”

Bezos has decided to focus his charity on children, as many of his peers have done. From Mark Zuckerberg promising to fund a technological revolution in the way kids are taught, to the slew of east coast hedge fund managers promoting charter schools as a way to shake-up public education, philanthropists know instinctively that childhood is their point of maximum leverage.....engagement trumps disengagement. Public service matters, even if one is only stealing apocalyptic proclamations from a presidential desk. It beats burying one’s head in the New Zealand soil.

Many of the world’s richest individuals are working to avert the war, pestilence or revolution that would make a withdrawal from society seem attractive in the first place. Philanthropists who are funding human rights campaigns, or drug research, or novel approaches to tackling inequality — these are the real survivalists.
apocalypses  bolt-holes  catastrophes  charities  childhood  children  disasters  disaster_preparedness  engaged_citizenry  hard_work  high_net_worth  Jeff_Bezos  mission-driven  moguls  Montessori  New_Zealand  novel  off-grid  optimism  Peter_Thiel  self-improvement  philanthropy  public_service  survivalists 
october 2018 by jerryking
The belle époque of the small nation is over
September 28, 2018 | Financial Times | by JANAN GANESH.

Globalisation has been the era of small countries but that time may now be passing. Ganesh raises an interesting point, what happens to small countries that, since the end of WW2, have enjoyed the protection of the rules-based system (UN, WTO, NATO, Pax Americana).

Singapore leaders were determined in their quest to that small nation be less small.....The paradox is that smallness has been an edge, not a curse, in the liberal age. For all the grandiloquence about a Washington Consensus and a Pax Americana, the US was never the principal profiteer from globalisation.....The real beneficiaries were the rapid enrichment of Ireland, the ethnic diversification of Sweden, the technological fecundity of Israel and the rise of Dubai from the sands as a shimmering entrepôt......1990-2010 was the golden age--the belle époque--of the small nation....Rules-based globalism was a precious equaliser for these places.... it also made advantages of their liabilities....Their shortage of domestic consumers was the ultimate incentive to cast around for other markets. Their lack of capital made them welcome foreign investors. Even the nicheness of their native languages (in some cases) obliged them to master English.

There is, without leaning too much on “national character”, a small-country hardiness ....an acceptance of the outside world as a non-negotiable fact: a blend of fatalism and resourcefulness that makes for formidable migrants....If small countries have mastered the global age, it is a feat that goes beyond the economic. They also have a cultural reach that was hard to picture not long ago, when nations needed the brawn of a BBC or a Canal Plus to foist their creative wares on distant audiences....all attest to what we are now obliged to call the “soft power” of small countries....The mistake is to see this moment as eternal. For those who live in or care about these places, the dread is that the coming decades will be as harsh as the last few have been kind. Almost all the conditions that allowed small nations to bloom look precarious....growing protectionism...big states throwing their weight around....Peter Thiel, in his bid for NZ citizenship, said he found “no other country that aligns more with my view of the future than New Zealand”. It was telling that such a prolific maker of sound bets backed a small, open, adaptable nation.
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I am more optimistic and believe many small states will adjust just fine. Why? Think of Taleb's flexibility idea - small states are less fragile than bigger ones, more nimble, more homogenous, faster to change I like also to add that there are more smaller successful counties than the ones mentioned (e.g., Switzerland, Costa Rica).
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The flip side is that small countries may have greater ability to act thoughtfully and coherently than larger peers. But I agree - it is likely to be tough ahead.

Here in Singapore, a senior politician summed it up very well: we are just a block of granite in the south china sea, and have no God-given right to exist as a country. The only way we can survive is by being paranoid and continuously reinventing ourselves.
city-states  globalization  Iceland  Janan_Ganesh  nimbleness  Peter_Thiel  post_globalization  rules-based  Singapore  small_states  soft_power  antifragility  Dubai  Ireland  punch-above-its-weight  paranoia  reinvention 
october 2018 by jerryking
Tech Luminary Peter Thiel Parts Ways With Silicon Valley - WSJ
By Douglas MacMillan, Keach Hagey and Deepa Seetharaman
Feb. 15, 2018
Peter_Thiel 
february 2018 by jerryking
Peter Thiel, Trump’s Tech Pal, Explains Himself - The New York Times
By MAUREEN DOWDJAN. 11, 2017
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Peter_Thiel  Silicon_Valley  Donald_Trump 
january 2017 by jerryking
Sam Altman’s Manifest Destiny - The New Yorker
OCTOBER 10, 2016 |New Yorker | Tad Friend.

Quotation from Admiral Hyman Rickover. “The great end of life is not knowledge, but action,” ...“I believe it is the duty of each of us to act as if the fate of the world depended on him. . . . We must live for the future, not for our own comfort or success.”
Sam_Altman  doers  Y_Combinator  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  investors  entrepreneur  quotes  Paul_Graham  Peter_Thiel  action-oriented  forward_looking  future 
october 2016 by jerryking
The Mind of Marc Andreessen - The New Yorker
MAY 18, 2015 | New Yorker | BY TAD FRIEND.

Doug Leone, one of the leaders of Sequoia Capital, by consensus Silicon Valley’s top firm, said, “The biggest outcomes come when you break your previous mental model. The black-swan events of the past forty years—the PC, the router, the Internet, the iPhone—nobody had theses around those. So what’s useful to us is having Dumbo ears.”* A great V.C. keeps his ears pricked for a disturbing story with the elements of a fairy tale. This tale begins in another age (which happens to be the future), and features a lowborn hero who knows a secret from his hardscrabble experience. The hero encounters royalty (the V.C.s) who test him, and he harnesses magic (technology) to prevail. The tale ends in heaping treasure chests for all, borne home on the unicorn’s back....Marc Andreessen is tomorrow’s advance man, routinely laying out “what will happen in the next ten, twenty, thirty years,” as if he were glancing at his Google calendar. He views his acuity as a matter of careful observation and extrapolation, and often invokes William Gibson’s observation “The future is already here—it’s just not very evenly distributed.”....Andreessen applies a maxim from his friend and intellectual sparring partner Peter Thiel, who co-founded PayPal and was an early investor in LinkedIn and Yelp. When a reputable venture firm leads two consecutive rounds of investment in a company, Andreessen told me, Thiel believes that that is “a screaming buy signal, and the bigger the markup on the last round the more undervalued the company is.” Thiel’s point, which takes a moment to digest, is that, when a company grows extremely rapidly, even its bullish V.C.s, having recently set a relatively low value on the previous round, will be slightly stuck in the past. The faster the growth, the farther behind they’ll be....When a16z began, it didn’t have even an ersatz track record to promote. So Andreessen and Horowitz consulted on tactics with their friend Michael Ovitz, who co-founded the Hollywood talent agency Creative Artists Agency, in 1974. Ovitz told me that he’d advised them to distinguish themselves by treating the entrepreneur as a client: “Take the long view of your platform, rather than a transactional one. Call everyone a partner, offer services the others don’t, and help people who aren’t your clients. Disrupt to differentiate by becoming a dream-execution machine.”
Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  Silicon_Valley  transactional_relationships  venture_capital  vc  Peter_Thiel  long-term  far-sightedness  Sequoia  mindsets  observations  partnerships  listening  insights  Doug_Leone  talent_representation  CAA  mental_models  warning_signs  signals  beforemath  unevenly_distributed  low_value  extrapolations  acuity  professional_service_firms  Michael_Ovitz  execution  William_Gibson 
may 2015 by jerryking
Peter Thiel on Why Big Companies Don’t Think Like Startups - WSJ - WSJ
November 3, 2014 | WSJ | Interview of Peter Thiel by Mr. Dennis K. Berman.

Changing the World
MR. BERMAN: The term you use in your book is that a startup is an excuse to change the world. How do people inside big companies take that idea and make something of it? MR. THIEL: There are a number of larger companies that are still innovating fairly aggressively. I’m very biased, as an investor, to be pro-companies that are still led by the founders. The founders are often able to make more choices and take more risk and have more inspiration than more politically minded CEOs. The old founders don’t always live forever, that’s true. You need a figure that’s as close to a founder as possible.

In theory, large companies could do far more than small companies. They have more capital. They have longer time horizons. They can take more risks. I tend to think it’s always that the internal politics somehow get in the way.
bubbles  founders  internal_politics  large_companies  office_politics  Peter_Thiel  risk-taking  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  time_horizons  valuations  vc  venture_capital 
november 2014 by jerryking
Secrets of Silicon Valley - FT.com
September 20, 2014 | FT | By Richard Waters.

(1) Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future, by Peter Thiel with Blake Masters, Virgin Books, RRP£16.99/Crown Business, RRP$27, 224 pages

(2) How Google Works, by Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg with Alan Eagle, John Murray, RRP£25/Grand Central Publishing, RRP$30, 352 pages

(3) The Hard Thing about Hard Things: Building a Business When there are No Easy Answers, by Ben Horowitz, Harper Business, RRP£18.99/$29.99, 304 pages
Silicon_Valley  Peter_Thiel  Google  start_ups  book_reviews  Andreessen_Horowitz  hiring  books  Richard_Waters 
september 2014 by jerryking
Competition Is for Losers - WSJ
By PETER THIEL
Sept. 12, 2014

Adapted from Mr. Thiel's new book, with Blake Masters, "Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future," Mr. Thiel’s “Zero to One,” offers three prongs of his philosophy: 1) It is better to risk boldness than triviality. 2) A bad plan is better than no plan. 3) Sales matter just as much as product.
Peter_Thiel  competition  economics  Google  monopolies  books 
september 2014 by jerryking
Unlocking Secrets, if Not Its Own Value
MAY 31, 2014 | NYTimes.com |By QUENTIN HARDY.

Founded in 2004, in part with $2 million from the CIA’s venture capital arm, Palantir makes software that has illuminated terror networks and figured out safe driving routes through a war-torn Baghdad. It has also tracked car thieves, helped in disaster recovery and traced salmonella outbreaks. United States attorneys deployed its technology against the hedge fund SAC Capital, which was also an early investor in the company....Palantir’s software has been used at JPMorgan Chase to spot cyberfraud and to sell foreclosed homes; at Bridgewater Associates to help figure out investments for its $157 billion under management, and at Hershey to increase chocolate profits. The technology is complex, but the premise is simple: The software consumes huge amounts of data — from local rainfall totals to bank transactions — mashes it together and makes conclusions based on those unlikely combinations. Where is a terrorist attack likely to occur? What is a bad financial bet?...As Palantir expands into offering services to the private sector — now perhaps 70 percent of its business — Mr. Karp’s worry is losing control of what happens with its software....“The thing Alex worries about the most is they have a culture that’s hard to sustain as it grows,” said Mr. Carville, the Democratic consultant. “I take walks around Stanford with him, and he talks about it: ‘If we become something besides Palantir, what are we?’ ”...Palantir’s founders started with an idea from PayPal. At one point, PayPal was losing the equivalent of 150 percent of its revenue to stolen credit card numbers. It figured out how computers could spot activity — like a flurry of payments to a brand new account — at a global scale. ...“The idea was to pick one bank, and the rest would follow,” Mr. Ovitz said. JPMorgan was the first. Much as Palantir figured out navigating Baghdad by analyzing recent roadside attacks, satellite images and moon phases, it derived home-sale prices by looking at school enrollments, employment trends and retail sales. Data that JPMorgan thought would take two years to integrate was put into action in eight days.

JPMorgan still uses Palantir for cybersecurity, fraud detection and other work, loading half a terabyte of data onto a Palantir system each day, according to a Palantir video. ...Government clients also struggle with a data explosion. “Everything becomes more difficult, the more crime becomes global, the more state actors are involved, the more trades there are around the globe,” said Preet Bharara, United States attorney for the Southern District of New York. “It’s malpractice to have records and not search them.” He has used Palantir for several cases, including the SAC investigation....Palantir is now Palo Alto’s biggest tenant after Stanford, occupying about 250,000 square feet in downtown buildings, which hold many of Palantir’s 1,500 employees. Contracts around the world have surged as everyone’s data increases in size and diversity.
Palantir  Silicon_Valley  CIA  security_&_intelligence  software  Michael_Ovitz  organizational_culture  massive_data_sets  Peter_Thiel  data  information_overload  cyber_security  fraud_detection  platforms  actionable_information  JPMorgan_Chase 
june 2014 by jerryking
A Vision of the Future From Those Likely to Invent It - NYTimes.com
May 2, 2014 | NYT | By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER and CHI BIRMINGHAM. Claire Cain Miller writes about tech for The Upshot, a New York Times venture that presents news, analysis and graphics about politics and policy

“Start new businesses that create jobs and solve real problems. Also, someone could create a Khan Academy that focuses on professional and vocational skills.”
REID HOFFMAN

“There is a bow wave of uncounted billions of dollars of philanthropic contributions that will unfold over the next 10 to 20 years from Silicon Valley.”
MARC ANDREESSEN
bow_waves  Claire_Cain_Miller  technology  future  trends  Reid_Hoffman  Marc_Andreessen  Peter_Thiel  personalized_medicine  Silicon_Valley  disruption  drones  new_businesses  philanthropy 
may 2014 by jerryking
Invest like a legend: Peter Thiel
Jan. 30 2014 | The Globe and Mail | Alec Scott.Special to The Globe and Mail.

Is tech investing different from other sorts of investing?

It’s incredibly hard to get people to adopt new tech solutions, and you only get adoption of something if it’s 10 times as good as the next best thing. Amazon had 10 times as many books. PayPal was at least 10 times as fast as cashing a cheque....How do your years of competitive chess-playing help you invest?

Chess champion José Raúl Capablanca said, “In order to improve your game, you must study the endgame before everything else.” Successful businesses have a very long arc. In 2001, we concluded that three-quarters of PayPal’s value would come from 2011 and beyond. The same thing applies to all the big tech companies currently—LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter. Most of their value comes from the 2020s, 2030s and beyond. And so one of the critical questions is, what does the endgame look like, not how they will do in the next month.
Peter_Thiel  endgame  chess  Palantir  start_ups  long-term  market_risk  strategic_thinking  customer_adoption  personal_finance  orders-of-magnitude  Big_Tech  10x 
february 2014 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Peter Thiel - FT.com
December 20, 2013 4:06 pm
Lunch with the FT: Peter Thiel

By Richard Waters

Venture capital, where success depends on picking winners in the next hot tech markets and sticking with them, seems a long way from riding booms and busts as a hedge fund manager. In Thiel’s world, however, all things are connected, as he stitches ideas together into a grand unifying theory of our times.

The pieces fit together something like this. The historically anomalous bubbles of recent years – Japan’s stock market boom of the 1980s, the dotcom mania of the 1990s, the housing finance frenzy of the past decade and, now, the government bubble – all resulted from the fact that people retained outsized expectations for the future, even as reality came up short.
"Twitter may not be enough to take civilisation to the next level"

The reason for this expectation gap, Thiel argues, is that technological progress came to a halt at the end of the 1960s. As the website of Founders Fund declares: “We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters.” Thiel is still making it up to Twitter for this jab: it’s a perfectly fine company, he says, and may even be worth the high valuation placed on it by Wall Street, though he adds with deadpan irony that “it may not be enough to take civilisation to the next level”
anomalies  boom-to-bust  bubbles  dotcom  expectations  Founders_Fund  libertarians  Palantir  Peter_Thiel  Richard_Waters  Silicon_Valley  Twitter  vc  venture_capital 
december 2013 by jerryking
America the Innovative? - NYTimes.com
March 30, 2013 | NYT | By EAMONN FINGLETON.

How do we explain America’s sudden mid-20th-century ascent to technological glory? The credit goes not to freedom but to something more prosaic: money. With World War II, the United States government joined corporations in ramping up spending on R&D, and then came the cold war and the Soviets’ launch of Sputnik in 1957, which gave further impetus to government-funded research. One result was Darpa, which helped develop the Internet.

Throughout history, rich nations have gotten to the future first. Their companies can afford to equip their tinkerers and visionaries with the most advanced materials, instruments and knowledge.

This raises an epochal question: as China becomes richer, is it destined to pass the United States as the world’s most inventive nation? The question is all the more pertinent because many experts contend that America’s inventive spirit is already flagging. As the Silicon Valley venture capitalist Peter Thiel put it to me in an interview, American innovation in recent decades has been remarkably narrowly based. “It has been confined largely to information technology and financial services,” he said. “By contrast in transportation, for instance, we are hardly more advanced today than we were 40 years ago. The story is similar in treating cancer.”
China  U.S.  competitiveness_of_nations  innovation  creativity  China_rising  patents  DARPA  Cold_War  America_in_Decline?  post-WWII  Peter_Thiel  inventiveness  visionaries  abundance  state-as-facilitator  tinkerers 
april 2013 by jerryking
The year the Valley embraced sustainable food innovation
Feb. 21, 2013 | GiGaOM | By Katie Fehrenbacher.

When I ask Tetrick why his company is “venture backable,” he says because they are creating a powerhouse of innovative thinkers that can come together across disciplines, and traditional food companies just aren’t as nimble. Tesla used that same argument for why as a startup it can revolutionize the car industry, and out innovate against the large automakers.

But Tesla is a sort of outlier on a lot of levels. It’ll be harder to disrupt more traditional industries without Moore’s Law in your corner. But in the meantime, as these startups sink or swim, at least they’ll be putting the spotlight on a crucial problem: the food industry is broken and it needs technology and innovation to be fixed.
Silicon_Valley  food  food_tech  innovation  Vinod_Khosla  venture_capital  start_ups  Peter_Thiel  nimbleness  supply_chains  dysfunction  Moore's_Law 
february 2013 by jerryking
First Republic Bank
Entrepreneur, Investor, Philanthropist
Peter_Thiel  advertising 
january 2013 by jerryking
The Thiel Fellowship Aids Young Entrepreneurs with Grants - NYTimes.com
July 19, 2012 | NYT | By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER.
What you believe that no one else believes? For Jason Isaacs.

Applying for the Uncollege

The Thiel Foundation will start accepting applications again in November for its $100,000 grant. This may be a techie’s alternative to college, but the process involves two familiar fears: SATs and essays. (Last year there were two: one on how you plan to change the world, another on what you believe that nobody else does.) Of 1,000 applicants for 2012, about 40 were flown to the Bay Area for follow-up interviews and to pitch to 100 mentors. All finalists got to meet industry insiders, but only 20 made the cut.
Peter_Thiel  Claire_Cain_Miller  Colleges_&_Universities 
july 2012 by jerryking
Peter Thiel Opens a New Venture Capital Firm - NYTimes.com
June 20, 2012, 12:01 am2 Comments
Peter Thiel Opens a New Venture Capital Firm
By EVELYN M. RUSLI
Mithril Capital Management,
Mithril, led by Mr. Thiel and a former Clarium managing director, Ajay Royan, will seek “growth” opportunities — start-ups that have already raised some venture capital and are looking to ramp up significantly.
Peter_Thiel  vc  venture_capital  Ajay_Royan  Mithril  scaling  start_ups 
june 2012 by jerryking
Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup - Class 11 Notes Essay
May 11, 2012 | Blake Masters

Where does the U.S. have the biggest comparative advantage in exports? Probably in agriculture. Looking into agricultural technology is counterintuitive for tech investors, since agriculture is often about as far removed from technology as possible. But that’s a good sign. It turns out that there is some very promising agritech development underway. Agritech may turn out to be a valuable secret that one might miss by not thinking about how people are talking (or not talking) about the economy.
Peter_Thiel  Stanford  law_schools  agriculture  farming  comparative_advantage 
june 2012 by jerryking
Palantir, the War on Terror's Secret Weapon - BusinessWeek
November 22, 2011, 3:56 PM EST
Palantir, the War on Terror's Secret Weapon
A Silicon Valley startup that collates threats has quietly become indispensable to the U.S. intelligence community

By Ashlee Vance and Brad Stone
security_&_intelligence  Silicon_Valley  Peter_Thiel  threats  Palantir 
november 2011 by jerryking
FASTech: What Peter Thiel Looks For In Start-Ups - Venture Capital Dispatch - WSJ
OVEMBER 9, 2011, 6:10 PM ET
FASTech: What Peter Thiel Looks For In Start-Ups
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Peter_Thiel  start_ups  venture_capital  angels 
november 2011 by jerryking
Macro Man
January 2007 | Bloomberg Markets | by Deepak Gopinath
hedge_funds  Peter_Thiel 
october 2011 by jerryking
Want Success in Silicon Valley? Drop Out of School - NYTimes.com
May 25, 2011, 12:01 AM
Want Success in Silicon Valley? Drop Out of School
By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER
Claire_Cain_Miller  innovation  ideas  silicon_valley  start_ups  bubbles  Peter_Thiel  education 
may 2011 by jerryking
Peter Thiel: 21st Century Free Radical - BusinessWeek
February 3, 2011, 5:00PM EST text size: TT
Peter Thiel: 21st Century Free Radical
Never mind enormous yachts: Peter Thiel is spending his billions on
space travel, life extension, artificial intelligence, and paying top
students not to go to college

By Romesh Ratnesar
Peter_Thiel  profile  moguls  libertarian 
february 2011 by jerryking
VC's New Math: Does Less = More? - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 29, 2007 | WSJ | By REBECCA BUCKMAN. Thiel Seeks to Change Old Habits by Investing Small on Start-Ups.
Peter_Thiel  start_ups  early-stage  entrepreneurship  facebook  funding  investors  investing  Rebecca_Buckman  angels 
november 2010 by jerryking
Quid Emerges From YouNoodle, Delves Into Data on Private Firms - Bloomberg
By Ari Levy - Sep 14, 2010. Quid Inc. aims to shed light on
the insular world of technology innovators & investors while making
money itself. While public companies disclose financial results and
research plans quarterly, private-company information is less
transparent. That’s where Quid comes in, using its relationships &
research to fill in the gaps. The challenge will be getting enough
customers to pay for the data. “It’s in private companies where so much
of the world’s technology is being developed,” “To date, no one has
delved into what these companies are doing. That’s the data we care most
about.” To succeed, Quid will have to go beyond the kind of data that
more-established competitors have collected. Hoover’s, a unit of D &
B., has info. on 65 million companies, both public and private. It
sells the data via subscriptions. Quid’s likeliest customers are
companies that need to track technology trends, as well as govt. groups
involved with economic development &security.
Quid  Peter_Thiel  privately_held_companies  start_ups  scuttlebutt  opacity  data 
october 2010 by jerryking

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