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Former finance minister, ambassador and businessman Michael Wilson dies at 81 - The Globe and Mail
TIM KILADZE AND ERIC ANDREW-GEE
PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 10, 2019

Michael Wilson, a former federal finance minister and stalwart of Canadian business who overcame personal tragedy in later life to become an advocate for mental-health support, has died at 81.

Under prime minister Brian Mulroney, Mr. Wilson helped negotiate the North American free-trade agreement and brought in the federal goods and services tax, initiatives that were controversial at the time, but have survived to become pillars of federal policy......Mr. Wilson went on to have a laurelled career after politics as Canadian ambassador to the United States in the late 2000s and then chancellor of the University of Toronto from 2012 until 2018....He was also a veteran investment banker with a career in finance that spanned more than half a century and included senior roles at UBS Canada, Royal Bank of Canada and, most recently, Barclays Capital Canada.

But, of late, he was perhaps best known for his dedication to raising awareness of mental-health issues after his son Cameron died by suicide in 1995, at the age of 29​. That work included serving as chair of the Mental Health Commission of Canada for the past four years......Anthony Fell was Mr. Wilson’s boss as CEO of RBC Dominion Securities when Mr. Wilson was a partner in the investment bank, before entering federal politics. The two stayed close friends.

“It’s been said that one of the best thing you can leave behind is a sterling reputation for integrity and for making a positive difference in peoples’ lives, and this Michael Wilson has done throughout his life, in very full measure,” Mr. Fell said on Sunday.
Canada  Canadian  crossborder  Bay_Street  FTA  GST  investment_banking  leaders  mental_health  Michael_Wilson  NAFTA  obituaries  politicians  Progressive_Conservatives  RBC  UBS  UCC  uToronto  public_service  Tim_Kiladze 
february 2019 by jerryking
Former RBC banker is hero of new Michael Lewis book - The Globe and Mail
JOANNA SLATER
Former RBC banker is hero of new Michael Lewis book Add to ...
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NEW YORK — The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Mar. 27 2014
Michael_Lewis  RBC  writers 
march 2014 by jerryking
How to leave your company better off than you found it - The Globe and Mail
VINCE MOLINARO

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jan. 02 2014

How can you ensure that you are leaving your organization in better shape than when you took the reins? True leaders typically take the following steps:

1. Commit to making things better every single day – in ways that position your organization for both short- and long-term success. Don’t be a bystander and watch problems fester; have the courage to tackle them head on.

2. Guard the interests of the whole organization. Don’t just focus on your own department or self-interests.

3. Try to anticipate threats that can put your organization at risk. Stay plugged into what you hear from customers or employees close to customers. This is often where the early warning signs exist.
4. Build strong relationships both inside and outside your organization.
5. Develop an unyielding commitment to building a strong culture that drives high employee engagement.
6. Develop leaders for the future.
legacies  leadership  RBC  Gord_Nixon  stewardship  companywide  leaders  CEOs  employee_engagement  organizational_culture  leadership_development  relationships  anticipating  threats  thinking_holistically  long-term  short-term  incrementalism  nobystanders  warning_signs 
january 2014 by jerryking
What Customers Want
JULY 7, 2003 | Fortune | by Larry Seiden and Geoff Colvin
To increase overall profitability, smart companies retain and
grow their most profitable customers and acquire more of them.
They fix, close, or sell their least profitable customers. And they
organize in a nontraditional way, around customer segments...
A winning value proposition is the one that best meets the full
set of customer needs, including price. That is, certain critical
elements of the experience deliver on the customers’ most important
needs better than the competition. This creates differentiation
and the potential for superior customer profitability—a mutually beneficial value exchange. Your goal is to create mutually beneficial value exchanges with customer segments that offer the greatest economic profit potential. Creating, communicating, and executing competitively dominant value propositions that earn exceptional customer profitability involves a sixstep process we’ve identified at leading companies and dubbed value proposition management.

Step 1: Figure out the needs
of your most profitable customers
Step 2: Get creative
Step 3: Test and verify your hypotheses
Step 4: Tell customers how great
your value propositions are
Step 5: Apply the best value
propositions on a large scale
Step 6: Begin anew.
customers  customer_acquisition  customer_experience  customer_lifetime_value  customer_profitability  customer_segmentation  Dell  Geoff_Colvin  Michael_McDerment  mutually_beneficial  RBC  value_propositions 
april 2012 by jerryking
Will This Customer Sink Your Stock? Here's the newest way to grab competitive advantage: Figure out how profitable your customers really are. - September 30, 2002
By Larry Selden and Geoffrey Colvin
September 30, 2002

Get ready for a big idea that's about to sweep through most companies: managing the enterprise not as a collection of products and services, not as a group of territories, but as a portfolio of customers. Of course, managers have always known that some customers are more profitable than others. But it's amazing how many executives, like those of that big retailer, haven't the least idea just how profitable (or unprofitable) individual customers or customer segments are.
customer_profitability  Geoff_Colvin  Dell  RBC  Fidelity_Investments  HBC  customer_lifetime_value  customers  retailers  banks  data_mining  data_driven  competingonanalytics  competitive_advantage 
april 2012 by jerryking
High net worth families using credit in innovative and strategic ways - The Globe and Mail
A Special Information Feature brought to you by
RBC Wealth Management
High net worth families using credit in innovative and strategic ways
Published Monday, Oct. 31, 2011 1:20PM EDT
Last updated Thursday, Nov. 03, 2011
CAFE  high_net_worth  credit  due_diligence  wealth_management  RBC 
november 2011 by jerryking
First nations new focus for Canada’s banks
Jun. 15, 2011 The Globe and Mail GRANT ROBERTSON. Ottawa’s
plan to pay out billions of dollars in land claim settlements to first
nations bands over the next several years, along with changes to the
mortgage market on some reserves, is opening up a lucrative and growing
business for the country’s banking sector. The Canada First Nation Joint
Action Plan, announced last week in Ottawa, extended the government’s
plan to settle outstanding land claims, paying out roughly $1-billion a
year to bands that are owed money. The reserves that are in line to
receive those payouts must line up a bank to manage that injection of
funds. This has spawned a burgeoning niche in Canadian banking, as
financial institutions compete for the right to manage that money
through their wealth management and trust divisions. Bank of Montreal,
Royal Bank of Canada, Toronto-Dominion Bank and Peace Hills Trust are
among the financial institutions now focusing on aboriginal banking as a
fast-emerging market.
banking  land_claim_settlements  BMO  RBC  action_plans  TD_Bank  financial_institutions  money_management  wealth_management  aboriginals  Altruvest 
june 2011 by jerryking
Igloo Secures Capital to Deliver Web 2.0 Collaborative Platform
Igloo Secures Capital to Deliver Web 2.0 Collaborative Platform
Anonymous. Wireless News. Coventry: May 12, 2008.
ProQuest  Igloo  RBC  venture_capital  funding 
february 2011 by jerryking
Skilled immigrants are the key to business success -
Sep. 10, 2009 | The Globe and Mail | by Gordon Nixon and
Dominic D'Alessandro. A global, competitive marketplace means tapping
into and investing in the strengths of all of the country's work force,
including skilled immigrants, so that local economies can grow, compete
and prosper.
immigrants  innovation  Nytric  RBC  Manulife  TRIEC  Dominic_D'Alessandro 
april 2010 by jerryking

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