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Losing the Signal: How BlackBerry’s bid to one-up the iPhone failed - The Globe and Mail
JACQUIE MCNISH AND SEAN SILCOFF
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 22 2015,
BlackBerry  RIM  iPhone  history  books 
may 2015 by jerryking
Hundreds of former BlackBerry staff hunt for Canadian tech jobs -
Nov. 14 2013 | The Canadian Press via The Globe and Mail |David Friend

Published Thursday,

Mobile payments firm Square Inc. has established a local office that will eventually house 30 to 40 Canadian employees, said Jack Dorsey, the company’s CEO who also founded Twitter.

“We’re really inspired by the engineers up here, so we want to invest in it,” he said in a recent interview, pointing to local schools as a key resource.

“There’s a skill level that was extremely impressive to us right away.”
BlackBerry  RIM  job_search  Square  alumni  Kitchener-Waterloo  engineering  talent 
november 2013 by jerryking
BlackBerrys once ruled the world - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Sep. 24 2013

BlackBerries ruled the world briefly, but their maker failed to see that future growth lay in the consumer market and in social media, not in the e-mail-obsessed business world.

When BlackBerry tried to adapt, it did so too slowly. It took years instead of the requisite months to launch an operating system that competed with the dominant players. Its corporate DNA was as unevolved as its products, and now the world has passed it by – even though its newest products can do virtually all the same things a Samsung or Apple smartphone can do.
BlackBerry  blindsided  RIM  PalmPilot  editorials  evolution  obsolescence  adaptability  windows_of_opportunity 
october 2013 by jerryking
How Not to Stay on Top - NYTimes.com
By JOE NOCERA
Published: August 19, 2013

Was BlackBerry’s fall from grace inevitable? When you look at the history of dominant companies — starting with General Motors — it is easy enough to conclude yes. There are companies that occasionally manage to reinvent themselves. They are nimble and ruthless, willing to disrupt their own business model because they can sense a threat on the horizon. But they’re the exception.

Wang Laboratories is the rule. And so is BlackBerry.

Wang went from an 80% market share in word-processing among the top 2,000 corporations to bankruptcy in about a decade, and BlackBerry of course went from inventing the cellphone and wireless email category, and utterly dominating it, to a a shadow of its former self today, with a “for sale” sign on outside corporate headquarters and a 2.7% global smartphone market share. What happened?

To rudely condense history, IBM’s PC happened to Wang and the iPhone happened to BlackBerry. At a somewhat more nuanced level, however, what happened to both Wang and BlackBerry is that when the storm clouds appeared they did not take their competitors seriously, they failed to understood what their customers wanted on the new landscape, and finally and most unforgivably they thought they knew what was best for their customers better than the customers themselves. More specifically, both firms thought their core customers were mistaken—wrong—to express a preference for the new, inferior arrival.
competitive_landscape  Wang_Labs  BlackBerry  blindsided  RIM  disruption  reinvention  failure  GM  IBM  iPhone  market_share  disproportionality  nimbleness 
september 2013 by jerryking
Where the BlackBerry still reigns supreme - The Globe and Mail
PAUL CHRISTOPHER WEBSTER AND IAIN MARLOW

JAKARTA/LAGOS — The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Nov. 29 2012,
BlackBerry  RIM  Nigeria  Indonesia  3rdworld 
december 2012 by jerryking
Canada’s vanishing tech sector
Jul. 07 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by SEAN SILCOFF, IAIN MARLOW.
Canada  Canadian  start_ups  technology  hollowing_out  RIM  funding  venture_capital  VC 
july 2012 by jerryking
Lay off Research In Motion - The Globe and Mail
Derek DeCloet | Columnist profile | E-mail
Published Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011 4:32PM EDT
Last updated Friday, Oct. 28, 2011
RIM  Derek_DeCloet 
october 2011 by jerryking
Blackberry's Jam
June 1st, 2005 | Bloomberg Markets | Anthony Effinger is a senior writer at Bloomberg News in Portland. aeffinger@bloomberg.net

Research in Motion is paying $450 million to settle a patent dispute over its popular e-mail device. Dispatching competition from mobile phone makers and Silicon Valley startups won’t be as easy.
patents  RIM  patent_trolls 
october 2011 by jerryking
BlackBerry Services Hit by More Disruptions - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 13, 2011 | WSJ | By WILL CONNORS, BEN DUMMETT and CHRISTOPHER LAWTON.

Research In Motion Ltd. scrambled to restore service to millions of BlackBerry users around the world Wednesday as the company's worst-ever outage vexed office workers, government officials, emergency responders and others who rely on the messaging device.

The intermittent service disruptions come at a vulnerable time for RIM, which has been struggling with dwindling BlackBerry shipments as it competes with Apple Inc.'s iPhone and gadgets powered by Google Inc.'s Android software.
RIM  BlackBerry  outages  intermittency 
october 2011 by jerryking
How Apple outsmarted RIM and Nokia
Oct. 08, 2011| Globe and Mail| ERIC REGULY.

On Tuesday at a tech fair in Finland, Nokia boss Stephen Elop said “the iPhone did something disruptive. It introduced a new level of experience … that all of a sudden everything else was measured against.”

...Apple’s genius was to make it a platform that could feed off a vast ecosystem that included iTunes and a stunning array of apps, from the Angry Birds game to carbon footprint calculators (the list has reached 500,000, should you have some free browsing time this weekend). The ecosystem is like a perpetual motion machine. Its sheer size attracts more and more app developers, who in turn make the ecosystem deeper and richer and ever more attractive to customers....

It was a great compliment to Steve Jobs and Apple. Mr. Jobs died the next day, but left Apple in great shape. It appears that Nokia, RIM and Apple’s other diminished rivals will measure their products against the iPhone for some time. The lesson: Build ecosystems, not just phones.
Eric_Reguly  Apple  RIM  Nokia  ecosystems  lessons_learned  competitive_strategy  platforms  network_effects  virtuous_cycles  winner-take-all 
october 2011 by jerryking
iPhone 4S unleashes more creative destruction | Considered View | Breakingviews
04 October 2011 | By Robert Cyran.

Apple has an astonishing ability to casually unleash creative destruction. Its latest iPhone, the 4S, offers faster data-processing and downloads, as well as voice-powered software. This may not have lived up to the most feverish expectations of investors: Apple shares fell while the market rallied. But it will do more than enough to create headaches for companies ranging from Research In Motion to American Greetings.

Smartphones started by devouring the personal digital assistant, as any former Palm Pilot aficionado can testify. They terrorized the market for fixed-line phones, which are now in sharp decline. Apple’s newest gadget shows just how hungry smartphone makers, and Apple in particular, are to eat rivals’ lunches.

The new iPhone’s camera offers sharply better video. That will further hurt sales of digital still and video cameras. Its software allows easy and free texting to other Apple devices. That’s bad news for telephone operators, who make fat margins on such services. Instant messaging has also been the killer app for BlackBerry users.
Apple  iPhone  creative_destruction  smartphones  wireline  margins  staying_hungry  RIM  BlackBerry  blindsided  voice_assistants  voice_interfaces  text_messages  free  investors'_expectations  bad_news 
october 2011 by jerryking
It's good to be smart
Nov 30, 2010 |The Globe and Mail. pg. A.24 | editorial.

It may be 20 years, or 50, before there is a direct payoff from the BMO Sir Isaac Newton Chair in Theoretical Physics at the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ont. Or from similar chairs to be named after Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Paul Dirac and James Clerk Maxwell. But the chairs are a wise investment that deserve emulating in other institutions in Canada.

It is not easy to be forward-looking in difficult times, but now is actually an excellent time to be investing in long-range projects that expand our intellectual capital. Why now? Because while other countries are hamstrung by economic problems, Canada is in decent enough shape to get a jump on attracting talent and stimulating innovation. In a borderless world economy, the value in becoming a magnet for scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs is immeasurable.

Abstract (Summary) Theoretical physics (the description of natural
phenomena in mathematical form) may seem like knowledge for knowledge's
sake. It is anything but, as Mike Lazaridis, the founder and co-chief
executive officer of the BlackBerry-maker Research in Motion Ltd., tells
it. The "next generation of value" will be intellectual capital, rather
than natural resources, he says.
Blackberry  BMO  borderless  broad-based_scientific_enquiry  editorials  endowments  forward_looking  hard_times  intellectual_capital  knowledge  Mike_Lazaridis  natural_resources  Perimeter_Institute  physics  physicists  RIM 
april 2011 by jerryking
RIM taps Polar Mobile for ‘at least’ 100 PlayBook apps - The Globe and Mail
OMAR EL AKKAD — TECHNOLOGY REPORTER
From Thursday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Mar. 30, 2011
Polar_Mobile  Omar_El_Akkad  RIM  mobile_applications  strategy  tablets 
april 2011 by jerryking
RIM, Carriers Fight Over Digital Wallet - WSJ.com
* MARCH 18, 2011 By PHRED DVORAK And STUART WEINBERG.

"The carriers have been saying in a gentle way to RIM, 'Guys, you won't
be doing this,'" said Robin Dua, chief executive of EnStream LP, a firm
set up by Canada's three biggest wireless companies to implement their
mobile-payments strategy. "I think it's going to be a little bit of a
fight, frankly."

Read more:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704360404576206412989185134.html#ixzz1Gvd8lAcv
digital_currencies  mobile_payments  RIM 
march 2011 by jerryking
Clinton Says BlackBerry Bans Hinder Rights - WSJ.com
AUGUST 5, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By PHRED DVORAK in New
York and MARGARET COKER in Abu Dhabi. Clinton Voices Support for RIM.
Citing Right of 'Free Use,' Secretary of State Enters Fight Over U.A.E.
Plan to Curb BlackBerry Access
Hillary_Clinton  RIM  BlackBerry  U.S.foreign_policy  Internet_freedom  U.A.E. 
august 2010 by jerryking
‘Design thinking’ strengthens brands
May. 20, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Rasha Mourtada. A
holistic approach is at the centre of design thinking, a philosophy that
refers to applying design principles to business. It encourages
business leaders to explore solutions by imagining what could be, rather
than what they know.

Mr. Perri partly credits design thinking with the success MHz has had
since its launch in 1993. What started as a traditional design agency
producing packaging and promotional material has morphed into a
strategic digital marketing firm. Along the way it has received
international awards for its innovative marketing techniques, and its
roster of clients includes such names as Rogers and Research In Motion.

Design thinking helped his firm adapt to new technology, says Mr. Perri,
and to work across multiple media, from print to television advertising
to social media.
Rasha_Mourtada  design  marketing  Rogers_Media  RIM  advertising  advertising_agencies 
may 2010 by jerryking
Alberta GPS company bent on making teens miserable
Jan. 09, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by Omar El Akkad
(Technology Reporter). “My basic thesis is that the smart phone has
become people's most personal computer,” said Fixmo Co-founder Rick
Segal. “And like personal computers, they need utilities to make them
better.”

Mr. Segal and his partners are hoping users find the suite of tools
useful enough to pay for. The company will roll out its BlackBerry
software first, followed by versions for the iPhone, Android and Windows
Mobile devices. Fixmo is one of a number of companies that was spawned
in whole or in part by Extreme Labs, a Toronto-based venture capital
firm.
Rick_Segal  Fixmo  BlackBerry  RIM  Bumptop  Extreme_Labs  venture_capital  Toronto  smartphones 
january 2010 by jerryking
Newly popular Nortel
July 24, 2009 | The Globe and Mail | Editorial
Nortel  RIM 
july 2009 by jerryking
Address by Mike Lazaridis, PI Board Chair, to the Public Policy Forum - Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
April 2, 2009 | Address by Mike Lazaridis, PI Board Chair, to the Public Policy Forum

First Principles: The Crazy Business of Doing Serious Science (Paperback)
by Howard Burton (Author) . It's an account of how the Perimeter Institute was built from scratch.

This year’s testimonial dinner was held on April 2, 2009, and honoured several Canadian leaders, including Mike Lazaridis, Founder and Board Chair of Perimeter Institute, who conveyed the importance of long-term thinking by those involved with shaping policy relating to science and technology. The following text, building on those remarks as reported by the national media, shares the messages provided to the PPF.
+++++++++++++++

So imagine this story. A granting council has been tasked with driving the economy, really building commerce and commercializing technology and doing important things for the country. And so, of course, what are they thinking? They’re thinking we need more horses, we need better ways to clean up the streets, and we need to figure out ways to build better stagecoaches and carriages. Now this physicist comes into the room and he sits down. And they ask him, "Dr. Einstein, why are you here?" He says, "Oh, I’d like to have an office and a stipend." "For what?" they want to know. So he explains, "Well, I need a desk and blackboard and maybe a shelf for my books and my papers. And I need a small stipend, so I can go to a few scientific conferences around the world and have a few postdoctoral researchers." They ask, "Why?" And he says: "Well, I have these ideas about light and it’s very complicated, but light can …" And the council members start wondering, "What’s that got to do with horses?"

So, that gentleman actually had to go and get a day job. He went to work at a patent office, where he came up with, a few years later, the four most important papers of all time. Ideas that transformed everything we knew and put mankind in a new direction. He came up with one of the basic ideas leading to quantum technology, when he predicted the quantum properties of light, explaining an observation called the photo-electric effect. He came up with special relativity, a new understanding of space and time. He also discovered that mass and energy are the same thing at a fundamental level. By thinking and calculating the way he did, he came up with E=mc2, the most famous equation of all time. These discoveries, over time, led to nuclear energy, semiconductors, computers, lasers, medical imaging, DVDs and much more. The powerful ideas happened from pure thought and research by someone who basically would have had to give up a comfortable salary at the patent office to take a research or teaching position at a university.

Now let’s fast-forward to today. We have all these issues. We’re running out of energy any way you slice it. And the energy sources that we have today are changing our climate and the environment catastrophically and irreparably. At the same time, we have this enormous need for value creation because our financial system basically ran onto a coral reef. We’re taking on debt to try to get ourselves off the reef, and there’s all this need for value creation and innovation. It’s kind of staring us in the face.

We only have to flashback to that gentleman thinking about light to realize that we need to fund our scientists and our researchers and our students. We not only need to fund them imaginatively, we need to have faith that what they are doing is going to be important in 20, 30, 40 or 50 years from now, and that we haven’t got a chance of understanding its relevance today.

And so we need to be very careful with policy, not to try to put everything in short-term context – not to try to figure out how something is only relevant today – because, if we do, we will make a mistake. We will go the wrong way. We will be investing in horses, carriages, and cleaning manure in the streets instead of fostering the research that can give rise to an idea or super technology that’s going to change the world.

Right now, there is some pandemonium in physics because we are running up against some paradoxes and some data that don’t make any sense. For example, Moore’s Law, which describes the miniaturization of computer chips, will reach its limit in 10 years. Everything we built our telecommunications industry and information age on is going to hit this limit, if we don’t find a new base. We need a new discovery. It’s going to happen, and we need to put major investments in these esoteric studies like quantum computing, quantum information science, quantum gravity, string theory and other areas, because I can guarantee you that one of the discoveries that will emerge is going to solve one of those scientific paradoxes and make sense of that weird data. And when that happens, 20 or 30 years from now, you won’t recognize things.
Albert_Einstein  Blackberry  books  broad-based_scientific_enquiry  first_principle  fundamental_discoveries  Mike_Lazaridis  miniaturization  Moore's_Law  paradoxes  Perimeter_Institute  physicists  public_policy  quantum_computing  RIM  semiconductors 
april 2009 by jerryking

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