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jerryking : regent_park   5

Pam McConnell 1946-2017: A true public servant
JULY 10, 2017 | Spacing Toronto | BY JOHN LORINC

Pam McConnell was a former teacher turned school trustee who had moved from the Toronto Board of Education to council in 1994, representing Ward 7 following a narrow victory. In office, she made it her mission to correct some of the failures of social planning that had rendered St. James Town such a challenging place to live. As she’d point out in interviews, families living high up in those apartment blocks had no backyards and needed local amenities, especially a fully equipped community centre......her stick-with-it-ness was legendary. McConnell’s fingerprints are all over the east half of the Toronto Centre riding, from the demolition of the eastern tail of the Gardiner Expressway to the waterfront projects that have sprouted between Yonge and Cherry.
Former mayor David Miller asked her to chair the Toronto Police Services Board, a job that has produced many perils for the women who’ve served previously in that post......McConnell was absolutely the best person for that position, not least because she knew, from her constituents, all about the social geography of low-income communities.
Indeed, I’d say her signature accomplishment was pushing the City and Toronto Community Housing to produce a “social development plan” (SDP) for the redeveloped Regent Park. ..... McConnell is most visibly associated with her advocacy of the new Regent Park pool and central park. But I’d say the plan may well be her signature achievement. It forced City officials to fully confront the reality that the low-income communities which stand in the path of speculative redevelopment pressure are so much more than two-dimensional collections of crime and socio-economic statistics housed in deteriorating buildings.

See also https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2017/07/12/pam-mcconnell-left-a-huge-legacy-to-toronto-and-a-big-legacy-project-for-her-council-colleagues-keenan.html
redevelopments  public_servants  city_councillors  women  Toronto  obituaries  tributes  John_Lorinc  St._James_Town  sticktoitiveness  Regent_Park  revitalization  social_geography  Corktown  Distillery_District  social_justice  city_builders  Yonge_Street 
july 2017 by jerryking
A superpark hides in Toronto’s Don Valley, waiting to be discovered - The Globe and Mail
ALEX BOZIKOVIC
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 15, 2016

historian Jennifer L. Bonnell wrote in her 2014 book Reclaiming the Don.

A few small moves would get it in motion. Proponents envision new bike lanes on Bayview Avenue that would make it less terrifying to go there on two wheels. An old rail trestle would become a pedestrian bridge. New bridges, stairs and paths would welcome people from Cabbagetown and from Regent Park, from Corktown and the emerging neighbourhoods in and around the Port Lands.

But in the longer term, the plan would mean combining two rail corridors, both controlled by Metrolinx, reconfiguring the DVP ramp to Bloor-Bayview and removing a city works yard that now sits in the middle of the valley. But governments are budgeting at least $1-billion for roads, water, parks and rail improvements in this zone, including the electrification of GO’s train lines and the Gardiner Expressway rebuild. The river is unruly, prone to powerful floods; a thoughtful, coherent landscape would mitigate the risks for infrastructure and serve the environment of the valley.
books  Brickworks  Cabbagetown  Corktown  design  Don_River  DVP  Evergreen  floodplains  floods  Gardiner_Expressway  GO  green_spaces  history  landscapes  Metrolinx  neighbourhoods  parks  Port_Lands  railways  ravines  regeneration  Regent_Park  small_moves  sustainability  Toronto  undervalued 
april 2016 by jerryking
Successful Pathways alumni are giving back -
Sep. 25, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | ANTHONY REINHART.
The chief privilege for Mr. Khan has been Pathways to Education, the
wildly successful stay-in-school program for high-school students, which
got its start in 2001 at the sprawling Regent Park public-housing
complex now under redevelopment in the downtown’s east end. Where other
programs have had spotty results with only some kids, Pathways has
consistently reduced drop-out rates by about 80 per cent, and sent 80
per cent of its participants, mostly kids in tough straits, on to
college and university.

The program, which stresses student and family mentoring, is old enough
now that more than 75 of its 500-plus alumni have finished
post-secondary studies and begun careers, while most of the rest, like
Mr. Khan, are still in school.
alumni  Pathways  Toronto  Anthony_Reinhart  Regent_Park  urban  high_schools  dropouts  redevelopments 
september 2010 by jerryking

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