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Companies should learn from history to avoid repeating mistakes of the past
September 27, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER.

Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it. -George Santayana
*****************************************************************
BEST BUSINESS HISTORY BOOKS
If you want to improve your knowledge of business history, two good places to start might be Prof. Martin’s books, From Wall Street to Bay Street, the first overview of the Canadian financial system in half a century, co-written with Christopher Kobrak, and Relentless Change, the only case book for the study of Canadian business history. Beyond that, here’s three others he suggests you could benefit from:

* Northern Enterprise: Five Centuries of Business History by Michael Bliss;
* Historical Atlas of Canada, Volumes I to III with different editors;
* Madisson Database Project 2018 by The Groningen Growth and Development Centre, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
*****************************************************************

Joe Martin, a professor of Canadian business history and strategy at Rotman School of Management, is on a mission. He believes Canadians lack sufficient knowledge of history in general and business history in particular. But rather than seize upon Santayana’s famed quote about the value of history, he points to an anonymous businessman who said, “I study history so I can make my own mistakes.”.....We fail in business schools, where virtually no courses are offered (other than at Harvard Business School, which has included history programs since its founding in 1908 and now has about 20 historians affiliated to the school). And we fail in corporations, where new leaders think history begins with their ascension and the few histories produced on the organization tend to be heavily sanitized....Certain themes recur in business history, of course. Recessions are one. Some signs suggest we may be on the cusp of one now, but each time they hit many corporate leaders seem flabbergasted, as if nobody ever experienced this situation before....Then there’s boom-and-bust. In the dot-com heyday of the late 1990s, Prof. Martin notes in an interview, he was chairman of Angoss Software Corp. and watching his net worth go up $250,000 a week. It was glorious until it started going down $250,000 a week. It seemed new, but history is littered with equivalent situations. .....At the core of understanding the history of our economy should be the baseball diamond growth model developed at the Stern School at New York University. At home plate is government because an effective political system enables economic growth. First base is a sound financial system, to allow growth. At second base are enterprising entrepreneurs to build upon that. Third base is for sophisticated managers of large corporations......As for corporate histories, he prefers them done by historians, with full access to the material, including key players. ....“Learn from history so you don’t repeat the mistakes of the past. That’s critical,”
best_of  boom-to-bust  books  business_archives  business_history  Canada  Canadian  dotcom  Harvey_Schachter  history  Joe_Martin  lessons_learned  Michael_Bliss  quotes  recessions  Rotman 
september 2019 by jerryking
Why big companies squander good ideas
August 6, 2018 | | Financial Times | Tim Harford

.....Organisations from newspapers to oil majors to computing giants have persistently struggled to embrace new technological opportunities, or recognise new technological threats, even when the threats are mortal or the opportunities are golden. Why do some ideas slip out of the grasp of incumbents, then thrive in the hands of upstarts?.....“Disruption describes what happens when firms fail because they keep making the kinds of choices that made them successful,” says Joshua Gans, an economist at the Rotman School of Management in Toronto and author of The Disruption Dilemma. Successful organisations stick to their once-triumphant strategies, even as the world changes around them. More horses! More forage!

Why does this happen? Easily the most famous explanation comes from Clayton Christensen of Harvard Business School. Christensen’s 1997 book, The Innovator’s Dilemma, told a compelling story about how new technologies creep up from below: they are flawed or under-developed at first, so do not appeal to existing customers. Holiday snappers do not want to buy digital cameras the size of a shoebox and the price of a car.

However, Christensen explains, these technologies do find customers: people with unusual needs previously unserved by the incumbent players. The new technology gets better and, one day, the incumbent wakes up to discover that an upstart challenger has several years’ head start — and once-loyal customers have jumped ship.
............Within academia, Rebecca Henderson’s ideas about architectural innovation are widely cited, and she is one of only two academics at Harvard Business School to hold the rank of university professor. The casual observer of business theories, however, is far more likely to have heard of Clayton Christensen, one of the most famous management gurus on the planet.

That may be because Christensen has a single clear theory of how disruption happens — and a solution, too: disrupt yourself before you are disrupted by someone else. That elegance is something we tend to find appealing.

The reality of disruption is less elegant — and harder to solve. Kodak’s position may well have been impossible, no matter what managers had done. If so, the most profitable response would have been to vanish gracefully.

“There are multiple points of failure,” says Henderson. “There’s the problem of reorganisation. There’s the question of whether the new idea will be profitable. There are cognitive filters. There is more than one kind of denial. To navigate successfully through, an incumbent organisation has to overcome every one of these obstacles.”

......Henderson added that the innovators — like Fuller — are often difficult people. “The people who bug large organisations to do new things are socially awkward, slightly fanatical and politically often hopelessly naive.” Another point of failure......The message of Henderson’s work with Kim Clark and others is that when companies or institutions are faced with an organisationally disruptive innovation, there is no simple solution. There may be no solution at all. “I’m sorry it’s not more management guru-ish,” she tells me, laughing. “But anybody who’s really any good at this will tell you that this is hard.”
Apple  blitzkrieg  disruption  ideas  IBM  innovation  iPod  missed_opportunities  hard_work  Rotman  Steve_Jobs  theory  Tim_Harford  upstarts  large_companies  WWI  Xerox  Walkman  Clayton_Christensen  organizational_change  organizational_structure  MPOF  militaries  digital_cameras 
september 2018 by jerryking
Rotman’s startup lab extends reach to the West Coast - The Globe and Mail
JENNIFER LEWINGTON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Sep. 30, 2016
Rotman 
october 2016 by jerryking
Rotman students receive crash course in the Brandes way - The Globe and Mail
LUKE KAWA
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Mar. 15 2015

The last book his father gave him before his death, Alan said, was Benjamin Graham’s The Intelligent Investor, which Charles Brandes calls the greatest investing book of all time.
uToronto  Rotman  crossborder  books  San_Diego  value_investing/investors  Benjamin_Graham  fundamental_analysis 
march 2015 by jerryking
Want to kickstart the Canadian economy? Try "indovation", says U of T prof | U of T News
January 26, 2015 | U of T News | Terry Lavender.

Professor Dilip Soman heads up U of T's India Innovation Institute. He explains how necessity can be the mother of innovation. Indovation is a portmanteau of the words “Indian” and “innovation” and it means taking existing constraints – such as a shortage of funds or raw materials – into account when developing a response to actual problems.... “Frugality is at the essence of it,” Soman says. “In India, unless you can drive down costs, your idea is a non-starter.

“For example, mobile banking. That’s a classic ‘indovation’. It came about as a response to a particular problem, and it was developed in India and adopted in the west,” says Soman.

we’re working on developing a dataset on reverse innovation; the idea that innovations that have developed in the global south can be scaled back to the western world,” Soman says. “We have white papers on several topics: crowd-funding, agriculture, and retail and investment opportunities. The goal is to build up a database of information that both researchers as well as practitioners can use.”
constraints  innovation  India  Rotman  uToronto  trickle-up  frugality  necessity  reverse_innovation  jugaad  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  datasets  Indians 
february 2015 by jerryking
Renaissance man Joseph Rotman was a patron of education - The Globe and Mail
JANET MCFARLAND
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 27 2015

He and his wife, the former Sandra Frieberg, whom he married in 1959 and with whom he had two children, have long been known for their support for Canadian culture and arts.
Rotman  obituaries  UWO  philanthropy  institution-building  moguls  tributes  benefactors  uToronto  culture  cultural_institutions  patronage  education  Colleges_&_Universities  renaissance  Renaissance_man 
january 2015 by jerryking
ROTMAN
JANUARY 30, 2015 | globeandmail.com: |
Rotman  obituaries  UWO  philanthropy  institution-building  moguls 
january 2015 by jerryking
Tracking the Rise and Potential Fall of the Talent Economy - The CIO Report - WSJ
November 14, 2014, 1:56 PM ET
Tracking the Rise and Potential Fall of the Talent Economy
Article
Comments
2
By IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER
digital_economy  talent  Roger_Martin  Rotman  Mihnea_Moldoveanu  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger 
november 2014 by jerryking
Why Imagination and Curiosity Matter More Than Ever - The CIO Report - WSJ
January 31, 2014 | WSJ | By Irving Wladawsky-Berger.

How can you foster imagination and curiosity? This was the subject of the 2011 book co-authored by JSB: A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change. One of its key points is that learning has to evolve from something that only happens in the classroom to what that he calls connected learning, taking advantage of all the available resources, including tinkering with the system, playing games and perhaps most important, absorbing new ideas from your peers, from adjacent spaces and from other disciplines....How do you decide what problems to work on and try to solve? This second kind of innovation–which they call interpretation–is very different in nature from analysis. You are not solving a problem, but looking for a new insight about customers and the marketplace, a new idea for a product or a service, a new approach to producing and delivering them, a new business model. It requires the curiosity and imagination.
ideas  idea_generation  STEM  imagination  tacit_data  Roger_Martin  Rotman  critical_thinking  innovation  customer_insights  books  interpretation  curiosity  OPMA  organizational_culture  cross-pollination  second-order  new_businesses  learning  connected_learning  constant_change  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  worthwhile_problems  new_products  mental_dexterity  tinkerers  adjacencies 
february 2014 by jerryking
The Ingenuity Imperative: What Big Data Means for Big Business - Harvard Business Review
by Mihnea C. Moldoveanu

Source: Rotman School of Management

5 pages. Publication Date: May 01, 2013
ingenuity  innovation  massive_data_sets  HBR  Rotman  Mihnea_Moldoveanu 
august 2013 by jerryking
Tips from the pros on how to advance your career
Dec. 28 2012 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER.

To advance your career, here are some other pointers:

(1) Surround yourself with smart people

As you move up in an organization, your responsibility increases, and it becomes tougher to do everything on your own.

“Many people feel defeated when they can no longer succeed through their own efforts. Rather than seeing it as a sign of personal weakness, surround yourself with smart people who have different perspectives and different skills,” she says. “Listen to them respectfully and attentively, draw out their ideas, and work to integrate their perspectives into your plans and solutions to problems.”

(2) Be your own CEO.

“Leadership isn’t about a title. Real leadership is about getting big things done in the face of challenges, being part of the solution versus the problem, and inspiring everyone around you – even if you’re the janitor,” he says.

(3) Know yourself

The foundation of success is self-awareness – of your strengths, interests, personality factors and the desires that form the basis of good career choices throughout life...spend time reflecting on one's internal processes.” Routinely ask yourself: Does what I am doing really play into what I’m best at or really want to do – or am I being sidetracked by the appeal of the money or the status of the promotion?

(4) Develop – and use – your contact list

If handed a business card, make sure you put it in your e-mail contacts and send a ‘glad to meet you’ note.” Then keep in touch, perhaps quarterly or twice a year for the “hot contacts” who might help you down the road to advance your career.

(5) Write an anti-résumé

Your résumé probably looks backward at your career. Instead write a forward-looking statement of your strengths, desires and influences, and what possibilities intrigue you for the future. It should be about a half-page, perhaps in bullet-point format. “update it regularly. It helps you to catch clues about the future rather than look through the rear-view mirror as a résumé does,”.

(6) Embrace the digital you (one-page branding site or an authentically powerful LinkedIn profile).
(7) Focus on the fix. (present solutions, not problems. See what might be accomplished, or suggest a solution to a problem or a means of overcoming a barrier.
(8) Rise above being average. Strive to be at the "Picasso-level".
(9) Get involved in volunteering.
(10) Polish your credentials.
LinkedIn  Managing_Your_Career  Roger_Martin  Rotman  Harvey_Schachter  tips  movingonup  self-awareness  networking  problem_solving  leadership  overachievers  personal_branding  CEOs  strengths  forward_looking  résumés  Pablo_Picasso  anti-résumé  volunteering  smart_people  backward_looking  one-page  high-achieving 
december 2012 by jerryking
Entrepreneurship, technology, prosperity - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 27 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Dany Assaf and Walid Hejazi.

Canada needs more innovation and entrepreneurship. We need better structures to allow people with great ideas to put them to work – to start their own businesses – and to allow us to earn our way out of our individual and collective challenges. We must refocus on the same basic proposition that built this country and rely on the imagination, skill and productivity of individual Canadians to do business. With the benefit of modern technology and arguably the lowest barriers to business entry in human history, it may not be as hard as we think....Today, however, the cost of overcoming entry barriers to meaningfully “get in the game” have never been lower. You can set up and operate a business from a laptop or cellphone. You can set up a virtual office with cloud computing technology. You have access to research and key information about your market and competitors. You can host global conference calls and web meetings with basic technology. Most importantly, you can reach customers worldwide on the Internet to sell your products and services. You can even seek start-up capital with online crowd funding. In other words, you can enter an industry, operate like a bigger player and grow a business globally faster, cheaper and more effectively than ever before.

This intersection of technology, falling barriers and entrepreneurship is powerful and encouraging as we look to maintain prosperity and create wealth for the future of our children and our country. A a great deal of this is already taking place in Canada, but we need to work on a national strategy and vision to harness, encourage and facilitate the continued growth of small business, and propel our economy through these uncertain times within a 21st-century model.
entrepreneurship  economic_downturn  small_business  Rotman  Canada  Canadian  innovation  industrial_policies  national_strategies 
december 2012 by jerryking
90 seconds to MBA acceptance - The Globe and Mail
JENNIFER LEWINGTON

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Oct. 19 2012
Rotman  Ivey  alumni  admissions  business_schools  MBAs 
october 2012 by jerryking
Driving ideas to success with plan for profit
Spring 2008 | alumni gazette | Paul Wells.

High commodity prices have made it fashionable in Ottawa lately to think of Canada as an emerging natural-resources superpower. But ideas remain a cleaner, more durable and renewable resource than anything you can dig out of the ground, and there has never been a better driver for the production and distribution of ideas than the disciplined application of the profit motive.
Paul_Wells  UWO  alumni  ideas  entrepreneurship  Rotman  Roger_Martin  Ivey  commodities  natural_resources 
september 2012 by jerryking
Finance executive brings innovative strategies to Kenyan business
September 1, 2012 | Report on Business | Paul Waldie.

With the help of contributions from the Sprott Foundation and Barrick Gold Corp., Mr. Di Girolamo created Terra Firma, a Canadian charity that provides business expertise to small businesses in developing countries. The organization began working in Kenya, first with a small food company and lately with a honey business based outside Nairobi called Honey Care Africa. Honey Care has seven full-time employees and about $200,000 in annual sales. Volunteers from Terra Firma have been helping the company revamp its operations, which includes managing bee hives at numerous farms, and improving its marketing. Terra Finna draws volunteers from Canadian businesses and the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management, many of whom have travelled to Kenya to work with the companies. Mr. Di Girolamo left for Kenya We believe that business can be part of the solution to world issues.
Paul_Waldie  philanthropy  Brookfield  charities  Kenya  small_business  management_consulting  inspiration  Rotman  developing_countries 
september 2012 by jerryking
Strategic Innovation: Dr. David Dunne Outlines the Potential of "Disruptive" Technologies
June 2004 | GFTC-Newsletter | David Dunne.

“Innovation is essential, and must be a central mission in any firm which hopes to succeed,” says Dr. Dunne. “And it’s easier for some, like food retailers, than for others,like food manufacturers. It makes sense for manufacturers to see what it is that retailers are doing, and learn from that example.”.....It takes about 3000
new ideas to generate only four reasonably viable products, only one of which will be truly innovative --and generating those 3000
new ideas requires constant effort.”....."Examining product experiments to see what was supposed to happen and what actually did happen can also provide a wealth of knowledge and new ideas. Finding inadequacies in underlying processes and finding ways to address those inadequacies can be fruitful, as can taking advantage of demographic changes, new knowledge, and changes in perception, mood, and fashion.”
disruption  innovation  private_labels  experimentation  new_products  CPG  manufacturers  food  agribusiness  Rotman  grocery  supermarkets  change  ideas  lessons_learned  retailers 
july 2012 by jerryking
It’s Not What you Know, Or Who You Know, But How You Know
The key distinction here is the Justificationist focus of large organization managers and the falsificationist focus of venture
fund managers...Mihnea Moldoveanu
Mihnea_Moldoveanu  Rotman  venture_capital  vs  decision_making  large_companies  opportunities  entrepreneurship 
april 2012 by jerryking
Tomorrow's B-School? It Might Be A D-School
AUGUST 1, 2005
Graphic: The B-Schools Who Get It, Plus The New D-Schools
E!
design  Colleges_&_Universities  business_schools  IDEO  Rotman 
april 2012 by jerryking
Lord of the Loaves | Steve Gibson, Fred's Bread, Toronto Bakery | By Susan Pedwell | University of Toronto Magazine
Summer 2011
Lord of the Loaves

Steve Gibson’s final MBA project has left him rolling in dough
By Susan Pedwell
baked_goods  MBAs  Rotman  alumni  uToronto  bread 
november 2011 by jerryking
Precious Cargo
October 6, 2011 | Report on Small Business | Siri Agrell
With high-definition TVs revealing the tiniest flaws in an actor's makeup, celebrities have retaliated by putting their faith in Cargo president Hana Zalzal's cosmetic solutions. And they're not the only ones snapping up the company's products.

Cargo Cosmetics, a multimillion-dollar international makeup brand headquartered in a modest building on an unassuming strip of Toronto's Don Mills Road, and guided by president Hana Zalzal, a 47-year-old entrepreneur who knows her physics, having earned a civil engineering degree at the University of Toronto followed by an MBA. She then worked for two years designing cable systems for Bell Canada before founding Cargo in 1995 with the idea of modernizing makeup.

The company has since become a global brand and a favourite of celebs and regular chicks alike, due in large part to the way she has applied her engineer's eye to the design and packaging of cosmetic staples.
Siri_Agrell  cosmetics  celebrities  makeup  women  entrepreneur  uToronto  engineering  Rotman 
october 2011 by jerryking
Foreign scholarships and the risky business of innovating - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 16, 2010 / Globe and Mail / Editorial. Neil Turok,
director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo,
Ont., which sets out to attract some of the world’s top scientific
minds, told The Globe and Mail’s editorial board yesterday, “Because the
rest of the world is in relative difficulty financially, now is the
time to attract global talent. Canada has an amazing opportunity.” A
good case, a difficult sell. Innovation means trying something that
can’t be proven in advance, as Roger Martin, dean of the University of
Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, says. The foreign scholarships
are a investment with a strong upside, and a high risk that is mostly
political.
Colleges_&_Universities  innovation  Ontario  scholarships  risks  talent_management  Rotman  editorials  Perimeter_Institute  political_risk  poaching  Kitchener-Waterloo  upside  high-risk  Roger_Martin  foreign_scholarships  war_for_talent 
november 2010 by jerryking
Preoccupations - The Urban Lands of Opportunity
June 25, 2010 | NYTimes.com |By RICHARD FLORIDA. Over the past
20 yrs., a new way of working and a new kind of workplace have evolved.
Increasingly, places (e.g. the Starbucks where we drink coffee &
send e-mail; the hotel lobby where we take a meeting; or the local
library where we write,edit & revise documents) are supplanting
plants — corporate HQ and factories — as the principal social and
economic organizing units of our time...Especially in tough times, it
makes more sense to choose a big city, with its thick labor markets and
greater economic opportunities, over a single company...The metabolic
rate of living organisms tends to slow as they increase in size. But
cities can achieve a faster rate of “urban metabolism” as they grow,
leading to more innovation, economic growth and improved living
standards. When cross-pollinated in the urban jungle, people come up
with more and better ideas and produce more results from those ideas by
finding more collaborators as well as critics.
Rotman  Richard_Florida  urban  cities  workplaces  work_life_balance  cross-pollination  information_spillover  metabolic_rate  metabolism  third_spaces  hard_times  coffeehouses 
june 2010 by jerryking
It’s innovation that matters
June 11, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | by Roger Martin, Dean -
Rotman, U of T, Chair - Institute for Competitiveness &Prosperity.
Our public policies designed to increase innovation aren’t working –
and this is because we confuse “innovation” with “invention.” The terms
are actually very different. Invention can be defined as “creation or
discovery of something new to the world,” often producer-driven,
following an inventor’s curiosity or expertise. While new, inventions
may not have any real use. Innovation is customer-driven, providing a
new product or process that adds value to somebody’s life. Innovations
improve economic or social well-being. Innovations are often built from
inventions....Innovation creates value in several ways, such as enabling
consumers to do something that had been impossible or difficult, or at a
lower cost, either by delivering the same benefits as existing
offerings, but at a lower price, or by maintaining the price but
reducing the overall costs of use.
innovation  innovation_policies  Roger_Martin  Rotman  uToronto  Four_Seasons  Harlequin  Manulife  public_policy  inventions  customer-driven  demand-driven 
june 2010 by jerryking
Harness the power of design thinking
May. 06, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Rasha Mourtada. design
thinking actually imagines what people might want and concretizes it.”
“Before someone created a loft space, everyone wanted eight-foot
ceilings. But when this other option was introduced, people gravitated
to it. The power of design thinking is introducing these new paradigms.”
Instead of approaching the design of a product – or a customer-service
experience, or a workflow or any other aspect of business – with the
idea of improving something that already exists, put the original idea
aside for a moment and start with a clean slate.

Imagining the possibilities is one thing. But how does that translate
into doing?
Rasha_Mourtada  design  Rotman  uToronto  Umbra  Loblaws  Four_Seasons  Indigo 
may 2010 by jerryking
Driving ideas to success with plan for profit
March 31, 2008 | Western News | By Paul Wells, BA'89.
Research works best when its only spur is the curiosity and energy of
thoughtful investigators with the tools to follow hunches. But the
product of their work - ideas - is likeliest to leave the lab when it is
pulled out by entrepreneurs who have an eye on the market. It's
important to get that balance right. It's pointless to fund only
research that looks likely to pay off. You can't know which ideas will
pay off. But new ideas won't go anywhere without competent managers to
implement them. Roger Martin at the University of Toronto's Rotman
School of Management has persuasively demonstrated that if Canada has
fewer high-tech industries than the United States, it's not because
we're doing less science, it's because we have a smaller
university-trained management class. Western's Ivey School of Business
is a big part of the solution, not part of the problem.
UWO  Ivey  Rotman  Roger_Martin  Paul_Wells  curiosity  commodities  natural_resources  research  R&D  entrepreneurship  commercialization  management 
may 2010 by jerryking
The Art of Integrative Thinking
Fall 1999 | Rotman Management | by Roger Martin and Hilary Austen. Modern leadership necessitates integrative thinking.
Integrative thinkers work to see the whole problem, embrace its multi-varied nature, and understand the complexity of its
causal relationships.They work to shape and order what others see as a chaotic landscape.They search for creative resolutions.
to problems typically seen by others as a simple ‘fork in the
road’ or an irresolvable bind brought about by competing organizational
interests.
strategic_thinking  critical_thinking  Roger_Martin  Rotman  filetype:pdf  media:document 
february 2010 by jerryking
Leading Blog: A Leadership Blog: Roger Martin on Assertive Inquiry
12.07.07 | LeadershipNow | Posted by Michael McKinney at
08:38 AM. “When we interact with other people on the basis of a
particular mental model, we usually try to defend that model against any
challenges. Our energy goes into explaining our model to others and
defending it from criticism.

“The antidote to advocacy is inquiry, which produces meaningful
dialogue. When you use assertive inquiry to investigate someone else’s
metal model, you find saliencies that wouldn’t have occurred to you and
causal relationships you didn’t perceive. You may not want to adopt the
mental model as your own, but even the least compelling model can
provide clues to saliencies or causal relationships that will generate a
creative solution.”

Ask:

* “Could you please help me understand how you came to believe
that?”
* “Could you clarify that point for me with an illustration or
example?”
* “How does what you are saying overlap, if at all, with what I
suggested?”
Roger_Martin  Rotman  questions  critical_thinking  saliencies  mental_models  ego  humility 
january 2010 by jerryking
Multicultural Critical Theory. At Business School? - NYTimes.com
January 9, 2010 | New York Times | By LANE WALLACE. "
students needed to learn how to think critically and creatively every
bit as much as they needed to learn finance or accounting. More
specifically, they needed to learn how to approach problems from many
perspectives and to combine various approaches to find innovative
solutions" . "...design thinking is, it’s focused on taking that
understanding you have about the world and using that as a set of
insights from which to be creative"....”...Yale has also added a
“problem framing” course that tries to have students think more broadly,
question assumptions, view problems through multiple lenses and learn
from history.
“There’s a great deal to learn from Bismarck, Kissinger, F.D.R. and
J.F.K. about problem framing".
Roger_Martin  Rotman  uToronto  design  ideo  critical_thinking  problem_framing  Tim_Brown  Yale  history  business_schools  FDR  JFK  Henry_Kissinger  von_Bismarck 
january 2010 by jerryking
Diverse, talented city a laggard on innovation; Other North American metropolitan areas such as Boston and Seattle are doing better at commercializing the ideas generated by their creative class
Aug 17, 2009 | Toronto Star. pg. A.11 | Kevin Stolarick. "We
share the concerns of our colleagues at the University of Toronto Cities
Centre whose recent report, The Three Cities within Toronto, showed
that the city's core is becoming gentrified, with visible minorities
moving to the fringes along major transportation arteries." "As we move
into the creative age, Toronto must continue to build on its strengths -
its multicultural and talented workforce - and leverage these to become
more innovative."
downtown_core  Roger_Martin  Rotman  Toronto  creative_economy  economic_development  strengths  multiculturalism  gentrification  income_inequality  commercialization  visible_minorities 
september 2009 by jerryking
MERGING THE ACADEMIC AND PRACTICAL
Aug 25, 2008 | The Globe & Mail pg. B.1 | by Gordon Pitts
Gordon_Pitts  profile  HBS  Rotman  entrepreneur  poets 
june 2009 by jerryking
reportonbusiness.com: Changing Gears
April 25, 2008 | Globe & Mail | by JOSHUA KNELMAN. Their
goal: Improve the experience of cancer patients at Toronto's Princess
Margaret Hospital. GEAR 1 DEEP USER UNDERSTANDING - Grichko and Leung
spent weeks hanging around PMH. GEAR 2 IDEATION AND PROTOTYPING The team
sat down with 20 PMH staffers—managers, surgeons, nurses and support
workers. "The idea of brainstorming is to have no limits—think big,"
says Leung. GEAR 3 STRATEGIC BUSINESS DESIGN Grichko and Leung asked
two key questions: "What do we need, and what's possible?" The answer
was simple: to create a better waiting-room chair
brainstorming  design  design_thinking  furniture  hospitals  idea_generation  ideation  innovation  MBAs  observations  OCAD  product_design  prototyping  Rotman  strategic_thinking  thinking_big 
february 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com - Economic vision for Ontario: foster ideas over industry
February 4, 2009| G& M |by KAREN HOWLETT on a report,
commissioned by Premier Dalton McGuinty and written by urban thinker
Richard Florida and Roger Martin, the dean of the University of
Toronto's Rotman School of Management. "Ontario's future depends on
nurturing creativity and intelligence rather than protecting the past by
bailing out struggling manufacturers,"
economic_development  Toronto  creativity  innovation  Dalton_McGuinty  Richard_Florida  Roger_Martin  Rotman  uToronto  Ontario  future 
february 2009 by jerryking

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