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jerryking : smes   10

A new boss for McKinsey - Firm direction
Mar 1st 2018

On February 25th the result of a long election process was made public. Kevin Sneader, the Scottish chairman of McKinsey’s Asia unit, will replace Dominic Barton as managing partner—the top job. He inherits a thriving business. The firm remains by far the biggest of the premium consultancies (see table). Over the past decade, annual revenues have doubled to $10bn; so too has the size of the partnership, to more than 2,000......Mr Barton claims that half of what it does today falls within capabilities that did not exist five years ago. It is working to ensure that customers turn to McKinseyites for help with all things digital. It has had to make acquisitions in some areas: recent purchases include QuantumBlack, an advanced-analytics firm in London, and LUNAR, a Silicon-Valley design company. It is increasingly recruiting outside the usual business schools to bring in seasoned data scientists and software developers.....McKinsey has kept plenty of older ones as clients, such as Hewlett Packard, but it has a lot more to do to crack new tech giants and unicorns (private startups worth more than $1bn). ....McKinsey’s response is to try to gain a foothold earlier on in tech firms’ life-cycles. It is targeting medium-sized companies, which would not have been able to afford its fees, by offering shorter projects with smaller “startup-sized” teams
appointments  CEOs  data_scientists  management_consulting  McKinsey  mergers_&_acquisitions  SMEs  software_developers 
march 2018 by jerryking
Why the human cloud can do your work better than you can - The Globe and Mail
IVOR TOSSELL
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Nov. 27, 2014

Nav Dhunay is offering oil-wells-as-a-service.

PumpWell puts small remote-monitoring and control units next to pumpjacks, the iconic bobbing horse-heads that pump oil from wells. “That in itself is not disruptive or extremely exciting,” says Dhunay. “But it’s more than just an automation controller.” What sets PumpWell apart is what they’re really selling: people. Instead of just offering a technological tool that lets oil-well owners keep an eye on their pumps, PumpWell has hired a team of its own oil-production engineers, and it sells their time to small and mid-sized firms on a subscription basis. “We’re combining the outsourcing model of IT, and tying it into the oil and gas industry,” says Dhunay.....Dhunay is a start-up entrepreneur who found himself heading up PumpWell in Calgary after stints in Silicon Valley. As he explains it, the logic is simple: Labour costs are sky-high in the oil sector. A seasoned production engineer can run you upward of $200,000 a year, and then there’s the overhead of having him running around oil fields in a truck, checking on things.

PumpWell can use its remote networks to keep oil engineers out of the field, run analytics on monitoring data to promote preventative maintenance, and increase the number of pumps each engineer can monitor. The company’s top-tier plan offers to monitor a pump for $12,000 a year. Today, PumpWell looks after 600 wells and, Dhunay says, it’s revenue-positive. “Our industrial engineers can manage upward of 150 to 200 wells per person. Traditionally, production engineers are handling 30 to 40.”

It’s not the only company that’s using cloud technology to take outsourcing services into new realms. Across the country, in Cambridge, Ontario, a cybersecurity company is applying much the same model to an entirely different business. ESentire specializes in securing the networks of mid-sized companies with critical intellectual property, like financial services and legal firms.
SaaS  oil_industry  Outsourcing  remote_monitoring  cyber_security  small_business  SMEs  subscriptions  cloud_computing  top-tier 
july 2015 by jerryking
South Korea’s chaebol problem - The Globe and Mail
IAIN MARLOW - ASIA-PACIFIC CORRESPONDENT
SEOUL — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 24 2015

Economic observers suggest the chaebol are now thriving to the detriment of other players in the economy – hoarding profits, increasingly focusing on overseas factories, squeezing domestic suppliers, and preventing the growth of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that employ nearly 90 per cent of South Korean workers. There are also ongoing concerns about crony capitalism and the massive firms’ close relationship with the government.
chaebols  South_Korea  conglomerates  problems  family-owned_businesses  cronyism  crony_capitalism  The_One_Percent  political_elites  corporatism  supply_chain_squeeze  SMEs 
april 2015 by jerryking
Africa’s stocks beckon, but there's a hitch - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 30 2013 | The Globe and Mail | DAVID BERMAN.

Mohamed El-Erian, best known as the chief executive of Pacific Investment Management Co. LLC, the $2-trillion (U.S.) asset manager, gushed over Africa in the latest issue of Foreign Policy.

He argued that the region is moving beyond its reputation as an operations base for multinational commodity producers and is now seeing economic diversification in the form of homegrown small-and medium-sized enterprises.

The World Bank, he noted, reckons that these firms add 20 per cent to Africa’s gross domestic product and generate some 50 per cent of new jobs in sub-Saharan Africa.

“These successful businesses are giving rise to internationally competitive companies, thereby providing access to global markets, new business models and technologies, and higher wages and salaries,” Mr. El-Erian said in the article.

Published
Tuesday,
Africa  commodities  investing  Mohamed_El-Erian  Nigeria  SMEs  stockmarkets  sub-Saharan_Africa 
may 2013 by jerryking
How the Global Middle Class Can Save the American Middle Class
May 25 2012 | The Atlantic | David Rohde.

Last week, 41 American companies received awards at a little-noticed White House ceremony. Despite the recession, the companies -- most of them small and medium-size businesses -- have experienced rapid growth and handsome profits in recent years. And they've beaten Chinese, Indian and European competitors at their own game.

How? By selling to a burgeoning global middle class expected to grow by 1 billion people -- primarily in Asia -- over the next decade...The awards -- and the places these companies have found customers -- show that the gravest threat to America's prosperity isn't the rise of middle classes overseas. It is Washington's blind adherence to dated ideologies that handicap our innovative small businesses. The world is changing, but Washington is not.
globalization  small_business  awards  exporting  middle_class  Asian  SMEs  Washington_D.C. 
may 2012 by jerryking
The financing gender gap - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 04, 2011|Globe and Mail | Special to MARJO JOHNE
An October 2010 report by the SME Financing Data Initiative – a joint
project by Industry Canada, Statistics Canada and Finance Canada to
gather information on financing for small and medium-sized enterprises –
found that, in 2007, 85 % of female-owned small businesses that applied
for a loan were approved. By comparison, the approval rate for
male-owned small businesses was 96 %. Female-owned businesses also got
less money, receiving an average amount of $118,000, compared with
$284,000 for the companies owned by men. At the same time, female
entrepreneurs had to provide lenders with more documentation – such as
personal financial statements, appraisals of assets and cash flow
projections – than male entrepreneurs, the report found.
gender_gap  entrepreneurship  women  uToronto  glass_ceilings  funding  financial_statements  SMEs  venture_capital 
march 2011 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: Shaken, but not bitter
February 25, 2011
Gordon Pitts

Savvas Chamberlain rode an emotional roller coaster late last year as he negotiated the sale of Dalsa Corp., the Waterloo, Ontario, technology company he had built and nurtured for three decades.

The 69-year-old electronics engineer agreed to accept a takeover offer from Teledyne Technologies of California.

Why do so few Canadians grow companies past $1 billion in sales?

Canadians don't really appreciate or understand the significance of
enterprise business - start-ups, private firms and small- and
medium-sized companies. The success of enterprise businesses benefits
Canadian society. The wealth generated by the enterprise is spent in
Canada. It can't easily be taken somewhere else.

What are you going to do now?

I've already started investing in other high-tech companies in the
Kitchener-Waterloo area. I'll concentrate on technology areas I
understand.
prospects  JCK  angels  investing  SMEs  Gordon_Pitts  uWaterloo  Kitchener-Waterloo  Dalsa  sellout_culture  shareholder_activism  investors 
february 2011 by jerryking
Wal-Mart Plans Drive to Buy More Locally Grown Produce - NYTimes.com
October 14, 2010 | By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD. Wal-Mart Stores
announced a program on Thursday that would focus on sustainable agriculture among its suppliers, as it tries to expand its efforts to improve environmental efficiency among its suppliers. The program is intended to put more locally grown food in Wal-Mart stores in the U.S., invest in training and infrastructure for small and medium-size farmers, particularly in emerging markets, and begin to measure the efficiency of large suppliers in growing and getting their produce to market.

Given that Wal-Mart is the world’s largest grocer, with one of the
biggest supply chains, any changes that it makes would have wide
implications.
Wal-Mart  sustainability  local  farming  locavore  supply_chains  SMEs  food  food_crops  measurements 
october 2010 by jerryking
Leadership development for small organizations
Mar 2002 | T + D | by Marshall Tarley. A discussion of how
small and medium-sized organizations can create an effective leadership
development program is presented. How GE creates talent is discussed. If
you want to be a leader at GE or in any business, you had better be a
top-notch manager. Management should be injected into people's DNA by
the way they are managed. Everyone at GE is imbued with the firm's
famous values, honed through years of input from GE managers. Everything
that is done at GE is measured against those values, including
performance appraisals, feedback, and goals. GE supports its managers
with leadership and management training. If the managers are successful,
they are given increasingly larger businesses to run and rotated into
different businesses.
corporate_universities  Crotonville  Freshbooks  GE  leadership_development  size  small_business  SMEs 
october 2009 by jerryking

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