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Andrew Marshall, Pentagon’s Threat Expert, Dies at 97 - The New York Times
By Julian E. Barnes
March 26, 2019

Andrew Marshall, a Pentagon strategist who helped shape U.S. military thinking on the Soviet Union, China and other global competitors for more than four decades, has died. He was 97. Mr. Marshall, as director of the Office of Net Assessment, was the secretive futurist of the Pentagon, a long-range thinker who prodded and inspired secretaries of defense and high-level policymakers.......Marshall was revered in the DoD as a mysterious Yoda-like figure who embodied an exceptionally long institutional memory.......... Marshall's view of China as a potential strategic adversary, an idea now at the heart of national defense strategy....Through his many hires and Pentagon grants..... Mr. Marshall trained a coterie of experts and strategists in Washington and beyond.....he cultivated thinking that looked beyond the nation’s immediate problems and sought to press military leaders to approach long-term challenges differently......His gift was the framing of the question, the discovery of the critical question..... always picking the least studied and most strategically significant subjects....Marshall’s career as a strategic thinker began in 1949 at the RAND Corporation, where his theory of competitive strategies took root. Borrowing from business school theories of how corporations compete against each other, Mr. Marshall argued that nations are also in strategic competition with one another. “His favorite example was if you can pit your strengths against someone else’s weakness and get them to respond in a way that makes them weaker and weaker, you can put them out of business without ever fighting,”....He had early insight into the economic troubles the Soviet Union was having, and helped develop strategies to exacerbate those problems and help bring about the demise of the Soviet Union....In 2009, Robert M. Gates, the defense secretary at the time, asked Mr. Marshall to write a classified strategy on China with Gen. Jim Mattis, the future defense secretary.
adversaries  assessments_&_evaluations  China  China_rising  classified  economists  éminence_grise  future  futurists  inspiration  institutional_memory  long-range  long-term  obituaries  Pentagon  policymakers  problem_framing  RAND  rising_powers  Robert_Gates  SecDef  security_&_intelligence  strategic_thinking  threats  trailblazers  uChicago 
march 2019 by jerryking
Harold Brown, Defense Secretary in Carter Administration, Dies at 91
Jan. 5, 2019 | The New York Times | By Robert D. McFadden.

Harold Brown, a brilliant scientist who helped develop America’s nuclear arsenal and negotiate its first strategic arms control treaty, and who was President Jimmy Carter’s secretary of defense in an era of rising Soviet challenges, died on Friday at his home in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. He was 91.....As defense secretary from 1977 to 1981, Mr. Brown presided over the most formidable power in history: legions of intercontinental ballistic missiles and fleets of world-ranging bombers and nuclear submarines, with enough warheads to wipe out Soviet society many times over......In retrospect, experts say, the Carter administration and Mr. Brown maintained the strategic balance, countering Soviet aircraft and ballistic innovations by improving land-based ICBMs, by upgrading B-52 strategic bombers with low-flying cruise missiles and by deploying far more submarine-launched missiles tipped with MIRVs, or multiple warheads that split into independent trajectories to hit many targets......By the time he joined the Carter administration, Mr. Brown had played important roles in the defense establishment for two decades — in nuclear weapons research, in development of Polaris missiles, in directing the Pentagon’s multibillion-dollar weapons research program, and in helping to plot strategy for the Vietnam War as secretary of the Air Force.....He had been a protégé of Edward Teller, father of the hydrogen bomb, and his successor as head of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in California. He had been president of the California Institute of Technology; had worked for Presidents John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard M. Nixon; and had been a delegate to the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT I). As the first scientist to become defense secretary, Mr. Brown knew the technological complexities of modern warfare. He began the development of “stealth” aircraft, with low profiles on radar. He accelerated the Trident submarine program and the conversion of older Poseidon subs to carry MIRVs. And, with an eye on cost-effectiveness, he and President Carter halted the B-1 bomber as a successor to the B-52. Mr. Brown laid the groundwork for talks that produced the Camp David accords, mediated by Mr. Carter and signed in 1978 by President Anwar el-Sadat of Egypt and Prime Minister Menachem Begin of Israel. ......In 1980, Mr. Brown helped plan a mission to rescue American hostages held by Iranians who seized the American Embassy in Tehran in November 1979.......Harold Brown was born in New York City on Sept. 19, 1927, the only son of Abraham Brown, a lawyer, and Gertrude Cohen Brown. From childhood he was considered a genius. At 15, he graduated from the Bronx High School of Science with a 99.52 average. At Columbia University, he studied physics and earned three degrees — a bachelor’s in only two years, graduating in 1945 with highest honors; a master’s in 1946; and a doctorate in 1949, when he was 21.....From 1961 to 1965, he was director of defense research and engineering, the Pentagon’s third-ranking civilian, responsible for weapons development, and one of Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara’s “whiz kids.” He was the Air Force secretary from 1965 to 1969, and over the next eight years he was president of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

After leaving the Pentagon in 1981, Mr. Brown taught at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University for several years, and from 1984 to 1992 he was chairman of the school’s foreign policy institute.

Since 1990, he had been a partner at Warburg Pincus, the New York investment firm.
'60s  '70s  Caltech  Colleges_&_Universities  Jimmy_Carter  leadership  obituaries  Pentagon  physicists  SAIS  SecDef  security_&_intelligence  the_best_and_brightest  Vietnam_War  whiz_kids  Cold_War  public_servants 
january 2019 by jerryking
Letters responding to Secrets and spies: can espionage ever be justified? | Financial Times
Please use the sharing tools found via the email icon at the top of articles. Copying articles to share with others is a breach of FT.com T&Cs and Copyright Policy. Email licensing@ft.com to buy ad...
letters_to_the_editor  espionage  SecDef  security_&_intelligence  politicians  tools  confirmation_bias  Pakistan  François_Mitterrand 
june 2018 by jerryking
America’s intelligence agencies find creative ways to compete for talent - Spooks for hire
March 1, 2018 | Economist |

AMERICA’S intelligence agencies are struggling to attract and retain talent. Leon Panetta, a former Pentagon and CIA boss, says this is “a developing crisis”......The squeeze is tightest in cyber-security, programming, engineering and data science.....Until the agencies solve this problem, he says, they will fall short in their mission or end up paying more for expertise from contractors. By one estimate, contractors provide a third of the intelligence community’s workforce.....Part of the problem is the demand in the private sector for skills that used to be needed almost exclusively by government agencies, says Robert Cardillo, head of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). To hire people for geospatial data analysis, he must now compete with firms like Fitbit, a maker of activity-measurement gadgets. .....The NGA now encourages certain staff to work temporarily for private firms while continuing to draw a government salary. After six months or a year, they return, bringing “invaluable” skills to the NGA, Mr Cardillo says. Firms return the favour by quietly lending the NGA experts in app development and database security. .....
war_for_talent  talent  data_scientists  CIA  security_&_intelligence  cyber_security  Leon_Panetta  SecDef  Pentagon  geospatial 
march 2018 by jerryking
Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core
NOV. 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By SCOTT SHANE, NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER.

“These leaks have been incredibly damaging to our intelligence and cyber capabilities,” said Leon E. Panetta, the former defense secretary and director of the Central Intelligence Agency. “The fundamental purpose of intelligence is to be able to effectively penetrate our adversaries in order to gather vital intelligence. By its very nature, that only works if secrecy is maintained and our codes are protected.”
adversaries  data_breaches  hacking  vulnerabilities  counterintelligence  counterespionage  moles  malware  ransomware  Fedex  Mondelez  Edward_Snowden  security_&_intelligence  Russia  Leon_Panetta  NSA  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  cyberweapons  tools  David_Sanger  SecDef  CIA 
november 2017 by jerryking
Hacks Raise Fear Over N.S.A.’s Hold on Cyberweapons - The New York Times
By NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER JUNE 28, 2017

The Petya ransomware attack....was built on cyberweapons (i.e. hacking tools that exploited vulnerabilities in Microsoft software) stolen from the NSA in 2016 by Shadow Brokers and made public in April 2017. Now those weapons are being deployed against various U.S. partners include the United Kingdom and Ukraine.....there is growing concern that United States intelligence agencies have rushed to create digital weapons that they cannot keep safe from adversaries or disable once they fall into the wrong hands..... the government “employs a disciplined, high-level interagency decision-making process for disclosure of known vulnerabilities” in software, “unlike any other country in the world.”....Officials fret that the potential damage from the Shadow Brokers leaks could go much further, and the agency’s own weaponry could be used to destroy critical infrastructure in allied nations or in the United States.

“Whether it’s North Korea, Russia, China, Iran or ISIS, almost all of the flash points out there now involve a cyber element,” Leon E. Panetta, the former defense secretary and Central Intelligence Agency chief.....viruses can suddenly mutate into other areas you didn’t intend, more and more,” Mr. Panetta said. “That’s the threat we’re going to face in the near future.”..... ransomware that recently gained the most attention in the Ukraine attack is believed to have been a smoke screen for a deeper assault aimed at destroying victims’ computers entirely. .....Mr. Panetta was among the officials warning years ago of a “cyber Pearl Harbor” that could bring down the American power grid. But he and others never imagined that those same enemies might use the N.S.A.’s own cyberweapons.....rogue actors actors, like North Korea and segments of the Islamic State, who have access to N.S.A. tools who don’t care about economic and other ties between nation states,”.....So long as flaws in computer code exist to create openings for digital weapons and spy tools, security experts say, the N.S.A. is not likely to stop hoarding software vulnerabilities any time soon.
adversaries  CIA  computer_viruses  cyberattacks  cyberthreats  cyberweapons  David_Sanger  exploits  hackers  Leon_Panetta  malware  NSA  North_Korea  Pentagon  power_grid  ransomware  rogue_actors  security_&_intelligence  SecDef  vulnerabilities 
june 2017 by jerryking
When the President Is Ignorant of His Own Ignorance - The New York Times
Thomas B. Edsall MARCH 30, 2017

How prepared is our president for the next great foreign, economic or terrorist crisis?

After a little more than two months in office, President Trump has raised doubts about his ability to deal with what the former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld famously described as the “known unknowns” and the “unknown unknowns.”

“President Trump seems to have no awareness whatsoever of what he does and does not know,” Steven Nadler, a professor of philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, wrote me. “He is ignorant of his own ignorance.”

During his first 63 days in office, Trump made 317 “false or misleading claims,” according to The Washington Post.
Donald_Trump  ignorance  U.S.foreign_policy  crisis  lying  Donald_Rumsfeld  unknowns  immaturity  self-discipline  self-awareness  SecDef 
march 2017 by jerryking
Rumsfeld's Rules
Rumsfeld's Rules
Wall Street Journal | January 29, 2001 | Donald Rumsfeld
Donald_Rumsfeld  rules_of_the_game  tips  indispensable  Pentagon  SecDef 
january 2014 by jerryking
Talent Shortage Looms Over Big Data - WSJ.com
April 29, 2012 | WSJ | By BEN ROONEY

Big Data's Big Problem: Little Talent

"A significant constraint on realizing value from Big Data will be a shortage of talent, particularly of people with deep expertise in statistics and machine learning, and the managers and analysts who know how to operate companies by using insights from Big Data," the report said. "We project a need for 1.5 million additional managers and analysts in the United States who can ask the right questions and consume the results of the analysis of Big Data effectively." What the industry needs is a new type of person: the data scientist.....Hilary Mason, chief scientist for the URL shortening service bit.ly, says a data scientist must have three key skills. "They can take a data set and model it mathematically and understand the math required to build those models; they can actually do that, which means they have the engineering skills…and finally they are someone who can find insights and tell stories from their data. That means asking the right questions, and that is usually the hardest piece."

It is this ability to turn data into information into action that presents the most challenges. It requires a deep understanding of the business to know the questions to ask. The problem that a lot of companies face is that they don't know what they don't know, as former U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld would say. The job of the data scientist isn't simply to uncover lost nuggets, but discover new ones and more importantly, turn them into actions. Providing ever-larger screeds of information doesn't help anyone.

One of the earliest tests for biggish data was applying it to the battlefield. The Pentagon ran a number of field exercises of its Force XXI—a device that allows commanders to track forces on the battlefield—around the turn of the century. The hope was that giving generals "exquisite situational awareness" (i.e. knowing everything about everyone on the battlefield) would turn the art of warfare into a science. What they found was that just giving bad generals more information didn't make them good generals; they were still bad generals, just better informed.

"People have been doing data mining for years, but that was on the premise that the data was quite well behaved and lived in big relational databases," said Mr. Shadbolt. "How do you deal with data sets that might be very ragged, unreliable, with missing data?"

In the meantime, companies will have to be largely self-taught, said Nick Halstead, CEO of DataSift, one of the U.K. start-ups actually doing Big Data. When recruiting, he said that the ability to ask questions about the data is the key, not mathematical prowess. "You have to be confident at the math, but one of our top people used to be an architect".
data_scientists  massive_data_sets  talent_management  talent  Pentagon  SecDef  limitations  shortages  McKinsey  war_for_talent  recruiting  Colleges_&_Universities  situational_awareness  questions  Donald_Rumsfeld  asking_the_right_questions 
june 2012 by jerryking
U.S. Plans Naval Shift to Asia - WSJ.com
June 1, 2012 | WSJ | By JULIAN E. BARNES.
U.S. Plans Naval Shift Toward Asia
Pacific to Host 60% of Navy by 2020, Defense Secretary Says, Rejecting View That Move Is Designed to Contain China
PACOM  U.S._Navy  Leon_Panetta  maritime  Asia_Pacific  SecDef  Pentagon 
june 2012 by jerryking
New Model Army - WSJ.com
February 3, 2004 | WSJ |By DONALD H. RUMSFELD.

Our troops have performed magnificently -- despite the significant increase in operational tempo of the global war on terror, which has increased the demand on the force.

Managing that demand is one of the Department of Defense's top priorities. Doing so means being clear about the problem, and fashioning the most appropriate solutions. Much of the current increase in demand on the force is most likely a temporary spike caused by the deployment of nearly 115,000 troops to Iraq. We do not expect to have 115,000 troops permanently deployed in any one campaign....That should tell us something. It tells us that the real problem is not necessarily the size of our active and reserve military components, per se, but rather how forces have been managed, and the mix of capabilities at our disposal....Army Chief of Staff Gen. Pete Schoomaker compares the problem to a barrel of rainwater on which the spigot is placed too high up. The result: when you turn it on, it only draws water off the top, while the water at the bottom is not accessible or used. Our real problem is that the way our total force is presently managed, we have to use many of the same people over and over again. In Gen. Schoomaker's analogy, the answer is not a bigger barrel of more than the current 2.6 million men and women available, but to move the spigot down, so more of the potentially available troops are accessible, usable, and available to defend our nation.
Donald_Rumsfeld  U.S._military  operational_tempo  managing_demand  modularity  U.S._Army  tempo  Pentagon  SecDef 
may 2012 by jerryking
Old Man in a Hurry -
July 1, 2005 | Esquire | By Thomas P.M. Barnett.

The inside story of how Donald H. Rumsfeld transformed the Pentagon, in which we learn about wire-brushing, deep diving, and a secret society called the Slurg
Donald_Rumsfeld  Thomas_Barnett  Pentagon  SecDef 
may 2012 by jerryking
Gates Silences Strategy Talk - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 6, 2009 | WSJ | By PETER SPIEGEL and ANAND GOPAL

Defense Secretary Robert Gates on Monday called on the U.S. government's civilian and military leadership to keep their advice to President Barack Obama on Afghanistan private amid an increasingly public debate over a White House review of war strategy.

-- provide your best advice to the president candidly but privately,"
Robert_Gates  advice  howto  Hamid_Karzai  Afghanistan  Stanley_McChrystal  SecDef 
october 2011 by jerryking
Basic Training: How Gates Grew - WSJ.com
JUNE 20, 2011 | WSJ | By JULIAN E. BARNES. Basic Training: How Gates Grew
Robert_Gates  lessons_learned  SecDef 
june 2011 by jerryking
The Gates Farewell Warning
MAY 28, 2011 |- WSJ.com |..As Reagan knew, America's global
power begins at home, with a strong economy able to generate wealth. The
push for defense cuts reflects the reality of a weak recovery and a
national debt that has doubled in the last two years. But the Obama
Administration made a conscious decision to squeeze defense while
pouring money on everything else.
***"More perhaps than any other Secretary of Defense, I have been a
strong advocate of soft power—of the critical importance of diplomacy
and development as fundamental components of our foreign policy and
national security," Mr. Gates said at Notre Dame. "But make no mistake,
the ultimate guarantee against the success of aggressors, dictators and
terrorists in the 21st century, as in the 20th, is hard power—the size,
strength and global reach of the United States military."
Robert_Gates  speeches  Pentagon  soft_power  debt  editorials  rogue_actors  U.S._military  hard_power  SecDef 
may 2011 by jerryking
Rumsfeld: Know the Unknowns - WSJ.com
APRIL 4, 2011| WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ. Before 9/11,
Rumsfeld distributed to colleagues a comment about Pearl Harbor by
economist Thomas Schelling: "There is a tendency in our planning to
confuse the unfamiliar with the improbable." Rumsfeld focuses on
unknown unknowns in order to encourage more "intellectual humility" ."It
is difficult to accept—to know—that there may be important unknowns."
"In the run-up to the war in Iraq, we heard a great deal about what our
intel community knew or thought they knew," he writes, "but not enough
about what they knew they didn't know." Policy makers can't afford to
be paralyzed by a lack of info., inaction by the world's superpower has
its own risks. Instead, Rumsfeld says the known known of info. gaps
should force a more robust give-and-take between policy makers &
intelligence analysts, allowing analysts to understand what policymakers
need to know & policymakers to understand what info. they can and
cannot get from intelligence.
Donald_Rumsfeld  superpowers  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  memoirs  decision_making  security_&_intelligence  information_gaps  humility  uncertainty  cost_of_inaction  unknowns  Thomas_Schelling  improbables  quotes  unfamiliarity  SecDef  policymakers  policymaking  intelligence_analysts 
april 2011 by jerryking
In praise of power seeker
Oct. 19, 2010 | G& M | Harvey Schachter. 7 qualities
build power: ambition, energy, focus, self-knowledge, confidence,
empathy, & capacity to tolerate conflict. Unlisted is intelligence
(overrated).Power must start somewhere,“People err in choosing where to
start accruing their power base.The common mistake is to locate it in
the dept. dealing with an org.’s core activity/skill/product – the unit
that is the most powerful at the moment,” The problem is that’s where
one encounters the most talented competition, well-established career
paths & processes. Further, what’s vital to an org. today might not
be in future. To move up, seek unexploited niches where one can develop
leverage with less resistance & build a power base in activities
that will be important in future. e.g., Robert McNamara & the whiz
kids at Ford built their power base in finance, acctg. & control
functions, rather than eng. allowing McNamara to become the 1st non-Ford
president. Wherever you start – stand out!
ambition  conflict_toleration  core_businesses  empathy  focus  Ford  Harvey_Schachter  influence  leadership  movingonup  Niccolò_Machiavelli  overrated  Pablo_Picasso  personal_energy  power  Robert_McNamara  SecDef  self-confidence  self-knowledge  unexploited_resources  whiz_kids 
october 2010 by jerryking
U.S., China to Rebuild Military Ties - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 29, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By ADAM ENTOUS. U.S., China To Rebuild Military Relations
PLA  maritime  security_&_intelligence  U.S.foreign_policy  Pentagon  China  Robert_Gates  Taiwan  SecDef 
september 2010 by jerryking
Be More Like Ike: Republicans should heed Robert Gates
August 16, 2010 | Newsweek | by Fareed Zakaria. "Robert
Gates’s latest efforts at reforming the Pentagon are modest. He is not
trying to cut the actual defense budget; he merely wants to increase
efficiency while reducing bureaucracy, waste, and duplication. The
savings he is trying to achieve are perfectly reasonable: $100 billion
over five years, during which period the Pentagon will spend
approximately $3.5 trillion. And yet he has aroused intense opposition
from the usual suspects—defense contractors, lobbyists, the military
bureaucracy, and hawkish commentators. He faces spirited opposition from
his own party, but it is the Republicans, not Gates, who are abandoning
their party’s best traditions in defense strategy."
Robert_Gates  Pentagon  Fareed_Zakaria  conservatism  GOP  cost-cutting  bureaucracies  SecDef  military-industrial_complex 
september 2010 by jerryking
http://www.newsweek.com/2010/09/12/what-gates-plans-to-do-before-he-leaves-office.print.html
September 12, 2010 | Newsweek | by John Barry and Evan Thomas.
Gates is not trying to cut the actual defense budget; he merely wants
to increase efficiency while reducing bureaucracy, waste, and
duplication.
Robert_Gates  overhead  Pentagon  efficiencies  bureaucracies  SecDef 
september 2010 by jerryking
The Transformer - By Fred Kaplan
SEPT. / OCT. 2010 | Foreign Policy | BY FRED KAPLAN
Robert_Gates  Fred_Kaplan  SecDef  Pentagon 
september 2010 by jerryking
Gates Seeks to Slash Military Bureaucracy - WSJ.com
MAY 10, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By YOCHI J. DREAZEN.
Gates Talks of Tough Choices Ahead . Defense Secretary Robert Gates said
the U.S.'s worsening economic problems meant the Pentagon had to slash
its bloated bureaucracy and purchase cheaper weapons systems, moves that
would dramatically change the DoD's normal ways of doing business.
Gates warned that the long run-up in defense spending in the aftermath
of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was coming to an end, forcing
the Pentagon and the nation's military services to become far more
disciplined about how they spent money on manpower and materiel.
Pentagon  Robert_Gates  cutbacks  bureaucracies  SecDef  hard_choices  military-industrial_complex 
may 2010 by jerryking
Gates Says U.S. Lacks a Policy to Thwart Iran - NYTimes.com
April 17, 2010 | New York Times | By DAVID E. SANGER and THOM
SHANKER. In an interview on Friday, General Jones declined to speak
about the memorandum. But he said: “On Iran, we are doing what we said
we were going to do. The fact that we don’t announce publicly our entire
strategy for the world to see doesn’t mean we don’t have a strategy
that anticipates the full range of contingencies — we do.”

But in his memo, Mr. Gates wrote of a variety of concerns, including the
absence of an effective strategy should Iran choose the course that
many government and outside analysts consider likely: Iran could
assemble all the major parts it needs for a nuclear weapon — fuel,
designs and detonators — but stop just short of assembling a fully
operational weapon.
Iran  Obama  Robert_Gates  memoranda  James_Jones  nuclear  contingency_planning  Michael_Mullen  David_Sanger  SecDef 
april 2010 by jerryking
Lockheed Eyes Broader Role in Liberia Under Government's "Smart Power" Plan - WSJ.com
MARCH 21, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by By AUGUST COLE.
Defense Industry Pursues Gold in 'Smart Power' Deals. The U.S.
government is hiring the defense contractors to test an emerging tenet
of its security policy. Called "smart power," it blends military might
with nation-building activities, in hopes of boosting political
stability and American influence in far-flung corners such as Liberia.
Secretaries Clinton and Gates have called for more funding and more
emphasis on our soft power, and I could not agree with them more," Adm.
Mullen said. "Should we choose to exert American influence solely
through our troops, we should expect to see that influence diminish in
time." The economic and political tenets of smart power are in many ways
a modern extension of past U.S. foreign endeavors such as the Marshall
Plan that helped rebuild Europe after World War II.
Lockheed  security_&_intelligence  Michael_Mullen  nation_building  Africa  soft_power  Liberia  U.S.foreign_policy  SecDef  Robert_Gates 
march 2010 by jerryking
From McNamara to Obama - WSJ.com
JULY 8, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | Bret Stephens. "But no
Nobel was required to understand that rationalism isn't a synonym for
reason, much less common sense,"
Bret_Stephens  hubris  Vietnam_War  elitism  rationalism  retrospectives  Robert_McNamara  SecDef 
july 2009 by jerryking
Architect of Vietnam war dies
Jul. 06, 2009 | The Globe & Mail | Pete Yost and Mike Feinsilber. Obit for Robert McNamara
Vietnam_War  obituaries  World_Bank  Robert_McNamara  SecDef 
july 2009 by jerryking
Robert Gates - Defense Secretary - International Relations - Politics - Iraq - Iran - New York Times
February 10, 2008 | New York Times | By FRED KAPLAN

* Importance of forward thinking/planning: “I learned to ask the
question, What’s Chapter 2?” he said. “If we do this, what will they do?
Then what? Then what? Try to think two, three, four moves out.”
* Making the boss successful.
* Meetings imply an action--a policy decision.
security_&_intelligence  profile  meetings  action-oriented  Robert_Gates  anticipating  Fred_Kaplan  forward_looking  managing_up  APNSA  SecDef 
april 2009 by jerryking

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