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jerryking : sir_john_a._macdonald   16

Opinion: George Brown, the futurist
July 1, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by MOIRA DANN, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

Memories of the people present for Canada’s beginnings can teach us a great deal. Sometimes looking back helps you reconsider and reframe the present, so you can see different possibilities for the future.....George Brown often gets short shrift as a Father of Confederation.....know he was the founder of The Globe, let alone a founder of the country.....Brown wasn’t the charismatic lightning rod his confrère and rival John A. Macdonald was, nor was he as ready to dance and sing and flirt and play his own compositions on the piano, as was his Quebec frenemy, George-Étienne Cartier..... he was the most forward-looking of the lot......Brown came to Toronto from Scotland in 1843 via a short, five-year sojourn in New York working in dry goods and publishing.......It wasn’t long before Brown, defending the principle of the government’s responsibility to Parliament, was haranguing Governor-General Charles Metcalfe about public-service appointments made without the approval of the elected representatives. Brown soon enough made the leap from journalism to politics. ...... he was back wearing his journalist’s hat in 1867, writing a 9,000-word front-page editorial for The Globe’s July 1 edition when Canada’s Confederation became a political reality......While still publishing and writing for political-reform-minded Presbyterian church publication The Banner, Brown had foreseen a market trend: He anticipated the desire for (and the money-making potential of) a good newspaper directed less toward partisan believers and more at a general reader, a paper with a strong point of view and attempting a national perspective. He started The Globe on March 5, 1844.......After Brown started The Globe – it merged, in 1936, with the Mail and Empire, to become the newspaper that you are reading today – he was able to print and distribute it widely to extol Confederation because of some forethought: He had started investing in new technology. Just two months after starting The Globe using a hand press that printed 200 copies an hour, he went to New York and purchased a Hoe rotary press that could produce 1,250 copies an hour. His was the first one used in Upper Canada. He also made a deal with a rival publication, the British Colonist, to share the cost of using the telegraph to bring news from New York and Montreal......One thing Brown never allowed to lapse was his dedication to religious liberty, civil rights and the abolition of slavery. .....Brown was also a vocal advocate of prison reform...... the work he most loved: being husband to Anne and father to Margaret (Maggie), Catherine Edith (Oda) and George.
abolitionists  ahead_of_the_curve  Confederation  forethought  futurists  George_Brown  George-Étienne_Cartier  Globe_&_Mail  history  journalists  nation_builders  newspapers  politicians  prison_reform  Sir_John_A._MacDonald  technology 
july 2019 by jerryking
Confederation: Canada’s early lesson in tolerance - The Globe and Mail
MOIRA DANN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Oct. 12, 2015

It wasn’t dissimilar in 1864 Quebec. Many of those top-hatted, suit-coated fellows could do little more than tolerate each other because of political differences and ancient slights. But they had gathered in Quebec a little more than a month after an initial meeting in Charlottetown that had sketched an outline of what a new Canada might look like. They were following up to colour it in.

John A. Macdonald and George Brown of Canada West (Ontario) and George-Étienne Cartier of Canada East (Quebec) were the primary instigators of the Confederation discussions; now they had to make sure all the goodwill flowing from September’s conference in Charlottetown would be shaped into a document. They had never been anything like friends but they had shelved their partisan, political and personal rancour when they took part in what’s known as the Great Coalition and then approached Maritime leaders about uniting British North America.
anniversaries  Canadian  Confederation  George_Brown  George-Étienne_Cartier  history  leaders  nation_builders  politicians  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  tolerance 
october 2015 by jerryking
Canada’s forgotten independence day
Mar. 11 2014 | The Globe and Mail | Lawrence Martin.

March 11, 1848, was the day when Canada’s united colonies got responsible government. You might go so far as to call it our independence day – the day real democracy arrived....
Baldwin and LaFontaine, leaders of the territories now known as Ontario and Quebec, convinced their colonial masters that allowing power to reside with an elected assembly instead of a governor’s appointed executive council was the only way to stave off anarchy....John A. Macdonald became our nation maker, as biographer Richard Gwyn calls him, but these men put in place the foundation. Lawyers by profession, they were not your typical win-at-all-costs politicians. Baldwin was a soft-spoken man who went about his work with a sunken heart. The pain at the loss of his adored wife at a young age never escaped him. But inescapable too was his devotion to the principles of democracy, social equity and justice. LaFontaine had that same commitment. He overcame strident opposition from francophone leaders in realizing his vision of a democratic union of the two cultures.

Not to be overlooked is Nova Scotia’s Joseph Howe, who secured responsible government for Nova Scotia two months earlier than Ontario and Quebec. His philosophy of governance paralleled that of Baldwin and LaFontaine. “The only questions I ask myself are, What is right? What is just? What is for the public good?” he said.
nation_builders  Lawrence_Martin  history  Canada  foundational  Canadian  anniversaries  public_goods  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  overlooked  forgotten 
march 2014 by jerryking
We can all be inspired by Sir John A. Macdonald - The Globe and Mail
Kim Campbell, Jean Chrétien, Joe Clark, Paul Martin, Brian Mulroney and John Turner

Contributed to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jan. 10 2014
nation_builders  Canada  Canadian  anniversaries  Sir_John_A._Macdonald 
january 2014 by jerryking
Jeffrey Simpson: Would it hurt our PMs to respect each other? - The Globe and Mail
May. 04 2013 | Globe & Mail | JEFFREY SIMPSON

Those with a taste for Canadian history should read Sir Wilfrid Laurier’s eulogy to Sir John A. Macdonald. Their parties had fought ferociously over big issues, and the partisanship of their day was ubiquitous. But great men seek public occasions to display respect to each other and, in so doing, invite their fellow citizens to respect the institutions of democracy.
Canadian  history  eulogies  Jeffrey_Simpson  civility  partisan_warfare  etiquette  post-partisanship  Jean_Chrétien  Brian_Mulroney  Pierre_Trudeau  courtesies  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  Sir_Wilfred_Laurier  leaders  politicians  nation_builders  Confederation 
may 2013 by jerryking
So much more than a nose on our currency - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 10, 2011 | Globe and Mail |JEFFREY SIMPSON.

If Richard Gwyn’s books were published in the United States, they’d be catapulted instantly onto all the bestseller lists and remain there for a long stretch....In Canada, Mr. Gwyn has produced a wonderfully researched, engagingly written two-volume biography of Sir John A. Macdonald, beautifully presented by Random House Canada. This is history on a grand scale, with a riveting central character and a country being literally built around him.

Nation Maker is an appropriate title for the second volume. Canada came together under Macdonald’s watch, and with his care. In the same time frame, the Meiji Restoration thrust Japan into the world, Bismarck united Germany and Il Risorgimento resulted in a united Italy. Canadian modesty aside, Canada has been a good deal less disruptive of the international order than these three countries for the past century and a half. Put that way, Canadian history is something to ponder, even celebrate.
Richard_Gwyn  history  historians  writers  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  Canada  Canadian  Jeffrey_Simpson  nation_builders  book_reviews 
december 2011 by jerryking
Why I give Sir John an A
Nov 25, 2004 | The Globe and Mail.pg. R.3 |Charlotte Gray

Last spring, I was a guest on CBC Radio. Callers were invited to phone in and describe the qualities that some mythical "great Canadian" should embody.
ProQuest  Canadian  Canada  best_of  history  historians  nation_builders  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  Charlotte_Gray 
october 2011 by jerryking
Nation Maker, by Richard Gwyn - The Globe and Mail
reviewed by ken mcgoogan
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 14, 2011
Nation Maker: Sir John A. Macdonald: His Life, Our Times, Volume Two: 1867-1891, by Richard Gwyn, Random House Canada, 676 pages, $37
Canadian  Canada  history  book_reviews  Richard_Gwyn  nation_builders  Sir_John_A._Macdonald 
october 2011 by jerryking
Nine hard truths
September 2005 | PROFIT magazine | By Rick Spence. The
immutable laws of being your own boss, and five ways to transcend them
all. 1. the 40-hr. workweek is not your friend. 2. Everyone is looking
for something new. But no one has any money for anything new. 3. All
the people you meet at a networking function are trying to sell you
something; 4. The phone doesn't ring by itself--make your own calls if
you want the phone to ring. 5. At any given time, everyone you want to
contact is in a meeting. 6. Basic courtesy is deader than Sir John A.
Macdonald. No one returns phone calls anymore. 7. Allies are like
employees: hard to find, hard to live without. 8. Opportunities are all
around you, but differentiating between an "opportunity" and a genuine
source of revenue-that's hard. 9. Most of the people you meet at large
corps. dream of working for themselves. KSFs: 1. Know what your market
wants. 2. Get yourself a peer group. 3. Trust in karma. 4. Be brave. 5.
Give it away.
motivations  inspiration  Rick_Spence  rules_of_the_game  ksfs  pay_it_forward  self-employment  owners  entrepreneurship  opportunities  karma  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  revenue_generation  interpretation  second-order  hard_to_find  courtesies  hard_truths  it's_up_to_me 
february 2010 by jerryking
Canada is failing history
Jun. 18, 2009 | Globe & Mail | by Marc Chalifoux and J.D.M.
Stewart. To function in a modern democracy, citizens must understand
the country’s past. We must teach them. Caanda's first four prime
ministers were: (1) John Alexander Macdonald (C) (2) Alexander Mackenzie
(L) (3) John Joseph Caldwell Abbott (C) (1st Cnd. born) and (4) John
Sparrow David Thompson (C).
Canada  democracy  education  engaged_citizenry  history  schools  Dominion_Institute  nation_builders  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  civics 
june 2009 by jerryking

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