recentpopularlog in

jerryking : stanford   72

Susan Rice Recounts Making Policy at the Highest Levels
Oct. 10, 2019 | The New York Times | By Abby D. Phillip.

TOUGH LOVE
My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For
By Susan Rice
Illustrated. 531 pp. Simon & Schuster. $30.

Tough Love is Susan Rice's memoir. Susan Rice doesn't allow herself to be defined by the events of September 2012 in Benghazi, Libya, after which she was demonized by the right-wingers in the U.S. ....Rice’s personal story is rooted partly in slavery in America and partly in economic migration to the United States.....Rice benefitted from privilege that gave her access to well-heeled private schooling, elite advanced degrees (i.e. Stanford University, and later was a Rhodes scholar at Oxford) and membership in the even more elite Washington society. Rice’s unflagging work ethic and drive stems from her family's belief that, "The only constraints we faced were our own ambition, effort and skill.” ......Early in her career at the National Security Council, Rice navigated some of the most difficult foreign policy challenges the country has faced in recent history, and in a pattern that continued into the Obama years her fate seemed constantly intertwined with Africa. The 1994 genocide in Rwanda provided an object lesson in the moral failures of inaction. Later, she dealt with another major crisis that would reverberate later in her career. The 1998 Nairobi embassy and Dar es Salaam embassy bombings.
Rice is clinical in her retelling of the foreign policy decisions of the Clinton and Obama administrations. And there is no attempt to neatly sew together an overarching narrative about her approach to foreign policy challenges based on her years of experience in government. In fact, that may be the lesson of her tale of “tough love.” Public policy, Rice argues, is pragmatic, and sometimes a little dark: “We did fail, we will fail. Our aim must be to minimize the frequency and the price of failure.”.....Rice's “assertiveness and relentlessness” has cost her reputation within the State Department as a difficult boss. Rice has considered--and ruled out--pursuit of elected office, preferring the comfort of policy-focused, behind-the-scenes roles.
African-Americans  APNSA  assertiveness  Benghazi  books  book_reviews  cost_of_inaction  failure  memoirs  NSC  Obama  policymaking  public_policy  relentlessness  Rhodes  Stanford  Susan_Rice  tough_love  U.S.foreign_policy  U.S._State_Department  women  work_ethic 
october 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Luke Perry Had a Stroke and Died. I Had One and Lived.
March 5, 2019 | The New York Times | By Kara Swisher, Contributing Opinion Writer.

Kara Swisher was 49 years old, healthy and had none of the conditions--symptoms--like high blood pressure that might predict a stroke...yet she had one after arriving in Hong Kong after a long flight...not hydrating or walking around enough on the long flight to Hong Kong, created what the doctor, who immediately started the treatment of anticoagulant drugs and others, called a “hole in one.”.....The idea of death — the absolute nearness of it — has been ever-present for Kara Swisher. Since her dad died, she's lived her life as if she had no time at all or very little, making the kinds of choices of someone who knew that tomorrow might indeed be her last.

[Stanford University in 2005 by the Apple founder and tech visionary Steve Jobs:

For the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been no for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure — these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.]

.....Sometimes {Steve Jobs'] urgency manifested itself in inspiration, sometimes in meanness, sometimes in humor, sometimes in seriousness. But it was always urgent.......[recast in my words...I have both the privilege to live more days on earth and the awareness that those days are limited.

Be tough-minded going forward--Basically, I don’t have the time to be so careless in what I do and I don’t have the time to not to ask the same of you.].........You get this kind of nudge again and again from death. It is, as the Buddhist teacher Frank Ostaseski noted, “a secret teacher hiding in plain sight.” Luke Perry’s death was yet another lesson from that teacher. ....... Mr. Perry’s Dylan McKay, who was given to saying things like, “The only person you can trust in this world is yourself.”
'90s  actors  hydration  Kara_Swisher  Luke_Perry  midlife  mini-stroke  mybestlife  op-ed  tips  speeches  Stanford  Steve_Jobs  strokes  symptoms  television  travel  It's_up_to_me  urgency  long-haul  deaths 
march 2019 by jerryking
Life as We Know It Turns 50 - WSJ
Dec. 2, 2018 | WSJ | By Andy Kessler.

1968's Joint Computer Conference, where an assembly of geniuses wearing white short-sleeved shirts and pocket protectors convened 50 years ago this week. The event shined a guiding light on the path to personal computing and set the modern world in motion.

On Dec. 9, 1968, Doug Engelbart of the Stanford Research Institute presented what’s now known as “The Mother of All Demos.” Using a homemade modem, a video feed from Menlo Park, and a quirky hand-operated device, Engelbart gave a 90-minute demonstration of hypertext, videoconferencing, teleconferencing and a networked operating system. Oh, and graphical user interface, display editing, multiple windows, shared documents, context-sensitive help and a digital library. Mother of all demos is right. That quirky device later became known as the computer mouse. The audience felt as if it had stepped into Oz, watching the world transform from black-and-white to color. But it was no hallucination.
1968  Andy_Kessler  anniversaries  conferences  GUI  San_Francisco  Stanford 
december 2018 by jerryking
Facebook’s Security Chief to Depart for Stanford University
Aug. 1, 2018 | The New York Times| By Sheera Frenkel and Kate Conger.

Alex Stamos, Facebook's Security Chief, will exit this month to join Stanford University in September as an adjunct professor and become part of a faculty working group called Information Warfare where he will examine the role of security and technology in society.....In an internal Facebook post from January Stamos wrote that the company’s security team was being reorganized and would no longer operate as a stand-alone entity. Instead, he wrote, Facebook’s security workers would be more closely aligned with the product and engineering teams and focus either on protecting the company’s corporate infrastructure or its users......Stamos had been working with the Stanford cyberpolicy program for several years and had piloted a “hack lab” class this past spring.....At Stanford, he plans to study the upcoming midterms and the role of technology, as well as election security more broadly and the topic of disinformation. He said he would also look at subjects as basic as passwords and try to reimagine how they could be made more secure.........Mr. Stamos also said Information Warfare was a new working group at Stanford with about 14 faculty members across academic disciplines. The group, which will begin meeting this fall, plans to research information warfare tactics and to develop countermeasures. Mr. Stamos said he planned to teach a class for law and policy students on how hackers attack, with the goal of familiarizing future policymakers with common hacking techniques......Stamos wants to address issues including online child safety and the naming of a country or group responsible for a cyberattack.
cyberattacks  cyber_security  Colleges_&_Universities  disinformation  Facebook  information_warfare  security_&_intelligence  Sheryl_Sandberg  Stanford  political_influence  C-suite  countermeasures  hackers 
august 2018 by jerryking
Arjay Miller, Who Led a Resurgence at Ford, Dies at 101 - The New York Times
By SAM ROBERTSNOV. 8, 2017
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Email
More
Stanford  deanships  business_schools  obituaries  Ford  leaders 
november 2017 by jerryking
Stanford dropout with a magical touch
Jul 14, 2017 | Financial Times | by: Hannah Kuchler.

Evan Spiegel refuses to be scared of Facebook. Confidence helped the 27-year-old Snap chief executive take a photo messaging app from a Stanford University coursework project to an almost $20bn initial public offering. The threat of Facebook has been following all the way.

In 2013, when the company behind Snapchat was just two years old, its co-founder (his partner was a fellow student, Bobby Murphy) was quizzed on stage about Poke, Facebook’s first attempt at imitating the app’s photo messaging. “Certainly it is scary when a giant enters your space and you are a small company,” Mr Spiegel said at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference. He laughed it off: Poke failed, and that became the “greatest Christmas present we ever had”.

But the world’s largest social network does not give up and has relentlessly imitated Snapchat since Mr Spiegel turned down its $3bn acquisition offer in 2013. Earlier this year, just as Snap headed for the public markets, Facebook finally succeeded in popularising a version of “Stories” in four of its apps — the Snapchat feature that expires after 24 hours.......an unlikely analogy..... “Just because Yahoo, for example, has a search box, it doesn’t mean they are Google.”......Mr Spiegel, who dropped out of Stanford, was the first chief executive from a new wave of highly valued tech start-ups to brave the public markets. It paid off personally: he became a multi-billionaire when he took Snap public....Spiegel is soaking up advice “like a sponge” from senior management and the board, which includes Michael Lynton, former chief executive of Sony Pictures and AG Lafley, former chief executive of Procter & Gamble.....Praised as a product genius who instinctively understands the desires of his young audience, Mr Spiegel now has to learn to be a public company leader, managing the expectations of investors who want to compare Snap to Facebook and Mr Spiegel to Mark Zuckerberg......By designing the disappearing photos that made Snapchat famous, Mr Spiegel completely rethought the camera. Photos became transient conversations, not kept for posterity; social media became a way to be creative — and silly — with your close friends, not flick through a feed of near strangers.....Sir Martin Sorrell, chief executive of WPP, told the Financial Times it plans to double its spending to $200m on Snap this year. But, he added, WPP will spend over 10 times more on Facebook.

...
dropouts  Stanford  IPOs  Snap  Snapchat  CEOs  Evan_Spiegel  WPP  Martin_Sorrell  product_development  product-orientated  public_companies  investors'_expectations  10x 
july 2017 by jerryking
Universities’ AI Talent Poached by Tech Giants - WSJ
By DANIELA HERNANDEZ and RACHAEL KING
Nov. 24, 2016

Researchers warn that tech companies are draining universities of the scientists responsible for cultivating the next generation of researchers and who contribute to solving pressing problems in fields ranging from astronomy to environmental science to physics.

The share of newly minted U.S. computer-science Ph.D.s taking industry jobs has risen to 57% from 38% over the last decade, according to data from the National Science Foundation. Though the number of Ph.D.s in the field has grown, the proportion staying in academia has hit “a historic low,” according to the Computing Research Association, an industry group.

Such moves could have a long-term impact on the number of graduates available for teaching positions because it takes three to five years to earn a doctorate in computer science. ....The squeeze is especially tight in deep learning, an AI technique that has played a crucial role in moneymaking services like online image search, language translation and ad placement,
Colleges_&_Universities  poaching  Alphabet  Google  Stanford  artificial_intelligence  Facebook  machine_learning  talent_pipelines  research  PhDs  deep_learning  war_for_talent  talent 
november 2016 by jerryking
The Billionaire Who’s Building a Davos of His Own - The New York Times
By ALESSANDRA STANLEYAPRIL 16, 2016
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Email
More
Stanford  moguls  philanthropy 
april 2016 by jerryking
Philip Knight of Nike to Give $400 Million to Stanford Scholars - The New York Times
By ALESSANDRA STANLEY FEB. 24, 2016

megagifts to elite universities have their critics, who argue they are more about prestige and ego than academic excellence. “This is just part of the crazy arms race between the top schools with no connection to reality,” said Malcolm Gladwell, a writer for The New Yorker and the author of “The Tipping Point” who posted scathing Twitter messages last year about Mr. Paulson’s gift to Harvard. “If Stanford cut its endowment in half and gave it to other worthy institutions,” he said, “then the world really would be a better place.”

According to the Council for Aid to Education, less than 1 percent of the nation’s colleges received 28.7 percent of all gifts in 2015.
Philip_Knight  Nike  entrepreneur  philanthropy  Stanford  Colleges_&_Universities  problem_solving  scholarships  elitism  endowments  prestige  ego 
february 2016 by jerryking
Reid Hoffman Is Teaching at Stanford, and You Don’t Have to Be a Student - Digits - WSJ
ep 15, 2015 CULTURE
Reid Hoffman Is Teaching at Stanford, and You Don’t Have to Be a Student
ARTICLE
COMMENTS
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
STANFORD UNIVERSITY
14 12
By GEORGIA WELLS
Reid_Hoffman  Stanford  students  Colleges_&_Universities  entrepreneurship  Greylock 
september 2015 by jerryking
How Stanford Took On the Giants of Economics - The New York Times
SEPT. 10, 2015 | NYT | By NEIL IRWIN.

Stanford’s success with economists is part of a larger campaign to stake a claim as the country’s top university. Its draw combines a status as the nation’s “it” university — now with the lowest undergraduate acceptance rate and a narrow No. 2 behind Harvard for the biggest fund-raising haul — with its proximity to many of the world’s most dynamic companies. Its battle with Eastern universities echoes fights in other industries in which established companies, whether hotels or automobile makers, are being challenged by Silicon Valley money and entrepreneurship....reflection of a broader shift in the study of economics, in which the most cutting-edge work increasingly relies less on a big-brained individual scholar developing mathematical theories, and more on the ability to crunch extensive sets of data to glean insights about topics as varied as how incomes differ across society and how industries organize themselves....The specialties of the new recruits vary, but they are all examples of how the momentum in economics has shifted away from theoretical modeling and toward “empirical microeconomics,” the analysis of how things work in the real world, often arranging complex experiments or exploiting large sets of data. That kind of work requires lots of research assistants, work across disciplines including fields like sociology and computer science, and the use of advanced computational techniques unavailable a generation ago....Less clear is whether the agglomeration of economic stars at Stanford will ever amount to the kind of coherent school of thought that has been achieved at some other great universities (e.g. Milton Friedman's The Chicago School neoclassical focus on efficiency of markets and the risks of government intervention and M.I.T.’s economics' Keynesian tradition)
economics  economists  empiricism  in_the_real_world  Stanford  MIT  Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  recruiting  poaching  movingonup  rankings  machine_learning  cross-disciplinary  massive_data_sets  data  uChicago  microeconomics  Keynesian  Chicago_School 
september 2015 by jerryking
REWRITING HISTORY | More Intelligent Life
From INTELLIGENT LIFE magazine, November/December 2014
humanities  Stanford  Asha_Isaacs 
august 2015 by jerryking
Learning to Engineer a Better Brisket - The New York Times
JULY 18, 2015 | NYT | By CLAIRE MARTIN .

They began by analyzing smokers on the market, focusing on Big Green Egg, a popular one with a ceramic cooking chamber. They evaluated the extra-large version, which costs $1,200. “We went through the patent of the Big Green Egg and just completely dissected it,” Mr. Parker said. “Where’s the opportunity here? Where’s the weakness here?”

They built computer models of Big Green Egg, of the brisket and, eventually, of their own smoker. They ran hundreds of computer simulations, and they learned that maintaining a precise, steady cooking temperature is crucial to evenly breaking down the meat’s collagen, tenderizing it. Several students spent their spring break taking a crash course in ceramics at the Harvard Ceramic Studio to build two prototypes of the smoker.

During the smoking sessions, the students attached sensors to the cooking surfaces and collected smoke particles and airflow data. They also inserted thermal imaging devices and probes into the brisket. “It was a heavily instrumented piece of meat,” Mr. Parker said. “It looked like it was in an intensive care unit.”

The final design was a 300-pound ceramic smoker with an hourglass shape that was inspired by power plant cooling towers. An internal computer controls fans that blow oxygen into the fire; it calculates whether the fire needs more or less oxygen and communicates the smoker’s temperature to a smartphone app. Refueling most other smokers requires opening the top and inserting more charcoal and wood chips, which destabilizes the temperature.

A chute on the side of the Harvard smoker lets the chef add more fuel without disrupting its internal temperature. Sensors gauge fuel levels, the temperature of the cooking surface and the weight of the food being smoked, and transmit that information to the app.
Harvard  students  Colleges_&_Universities  patents  competitive_intelligence  entrepreneurship  design  problem_solving  BBQ  engineering  Stanford  cured_and_smoked  beef  sensors 
july 2015 by jerryking
Google Should Feel Lucky in Its Finance Chief Hire - NYTimes.com
MARCH 24, 2015 | NYT | Robert Cyran is a columnist for Reuters Breakingviews. For more independent commentary and analysis, visit breakingviews.com.

Google should feel lucky about its search for a new chief financial officer.

There’s a dearth of executives with the financial, technology and government know-how needed to help run a $400 billion company. Even fewer women fit the bill. Silicon Valley and Wall Street just can’t find people like Morgan Stanley’s chief financial officer, Ruth Porat, fast enough. The challenge is to create more like her.

Ms. Porat grew up in Palo Alto, Calif., and graduated from Stanford before embarking on an almost three-decade career in investment banking.
CFOs  Google  Silicon_Valley  Wall_Street  women  Stanford  alumni  Andrew_Sorkin 
march 2015 by jerryking
Stanford and Its Startups
SEPTEMBER 11, 2013 | The New Yorker | BY NICHOLAS THOMPSON.
Stanford  start_ups  Colleges_&_Universities  entrepreneurship  incubators 
august 2014 by jerryking
Tachyus, a Data Start-Up for Oil Industry, Raises $6 Million From Founders Fund - NYTimes.com
By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED APRIL 10, 2014

Tachyus has been developing hardware and software to gather information wirelessly about various aspects of oil production, tracking production using iPads or a web app. The company’s products are in the process of being tested by prospective customers.

Mr. Sloss declined to comment on other financial details of the financing round, including the company’s valuation. But he said that Tachyus planned to use the money to enlarge its team to 30 to 40 people over the next two and a half years.

“Despite exciting advancements in renewable energy, fossil fuels will continue to drive the world’s energy supply for decades, and doing more with these limited resources is incredibly important,” Scott Nolan, a partner at Founders Fund, said in a statement. “Tachyus’s work in bringing a new level of operational intelligence to the oil and gas industry represents a huge opportunity on multiple levels.”
oil_industry  massive_data_sets  sensors  data  analytics  start_ups  Tachyus  Stanford  alumni  mobile_applications 
june 2014 by jerryking
Is Stanford Too Close to Silicon Valley? :
APRIL 30, 2012 | The New Yorker | BY KEN AULETTA.

"Kathleen Chaykowski, a junior, was a premed and an engineering major who switched to English, and last year was the editor-in-chief of the Stanford Daily. She spoke about the risk-taking that is integral to Silicon Valley. “My academic adviser said, ‘I want you to have a messy career at Stanford. I want to see you try things, to discover the parts of yourself that you didn’t know existed.’ ”"
education  experimentation  Stanford  Silicon_Valley  academia  innovation  intellectual_exploration  technology  messiness  risk-taking  self-discovery 
may 2014 by jerryking
The need for an analytical approach to life
November 3, 2013 | FT.com | By Rebecca Knight.

Risk analysis is not about predicting events; it’s about understanding the probability of possible scenarios, according to Elisabeth Paté-Cornell, professor at the Stanford School of Engineering.
In her latest research, she argues that expressions such as “black swan” and “perfect storm”, which have become journalistic shorthand when describing catastrophes, are just excuses for poor planning. Managers, should “think like engineers” and take a systematic approach to risk analysis. They should figure out how a system works and then identify the probable ways in which it could fail.
So does a black swan event exist?
The only one that I can think of is the Aids epidemic. In the case of a true black swan, you cannot anticipate it.
And what about ‘perfect storms’?
A combination of rare events is often referred to as a perfect storm. I think people underestimate the probability of them because they wrongly assume that the elements of a perfect storm are independent. If something happened in the past – even though it may not have happened at the same time as something else – it is likely to happen again in the future.
Why should managers take an engineering approach to analysing the probability of perfect storms?
Engineering risk analysts think in terms of systems – their functional components and their dependencies. If you’re in charge of risk management for your business, you need to see the interdependencies of any of the risks you’re managing: how the markets that you operate in are interrelated, for example.
You also need imagination. Several bad things can happen at once. Some of these are human errors and once you make a mistake, others are more likely to happen. This is because of the sequence of human error. When something bad happens or you make a mistake, you get distracted which means you’re more likely to make another mistake, which could lead to another bad event. When you make an error, stop and think. Anticipate and protect yourself.
How can you compute the likelihood of human error?
There are lots of ways to use systems analysis to calculate the probability of human error. Human errors are often rooted in the way an organisation is managed: either people are not skilled enough to do their jobs well; they do not have enough information; or they have the wrong incentives. If you’re paid for maximum production you’re going to take risks.
So in the case of a financial company I’d say monitor your traders, and maybe especially those that make a lot of money. There are a lot of ways you can make a lot of money: skill, luck, or through imprudent choices that sooner or later are going to catch up with you.
So you can do risk analysis even without reliable statistics?
We generally do a system-based risk analysis because we do not have reliable statistics. The goal is to look ahead and use the information we have to assess the chances that things might go wrong.
The upshot is that business schools ought to do a better job of teaching MBAs about probability.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
“Numbers make intangibles tangible,” said Jonah Lehrer, a journalist and
author of “How We Decide,” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009). “They
give the illusion of control. [Add "sense of control" to tags]
engineering  sense_of_control  black_swan  warning_signs  9/11  HIV  Aids  business_schools  MBAs  attitudes  interconnections  interdependence  mindsets  Stanford  imagination  systems_thinking  anticipating  probabilities  pretense_of_knowledge  risk-management  thinking_tragically  complexity  catastrophes  shorthand  incentives  quantified_self  multiple_stressors  compounded  human_errors  risks  risk-analysis  synchronicity  cumulative  self-protection  systematic_approaches 
november 2013 by jerryking
Book Review: Why Philanthropy Matters - WSJ.com
March 27, 2013 | WSJ | By LESLIE LENKOWSKY

A Buffett Rule Worth Following
WHY PHILANTHROPY MATTERS
By Zoltan J. Acs
(Princeton, 249 pages, $29.95).

entrepreneurs were as philanthropic as those born into wealth, if not more.

This surprising fact propels "Why Philanthropy Matters," by Zoltan J. Acs, a professor at George Mason University. Mr. Acs has spent his career studying how entrepreneurs operate and what role their business ventures play in the economy. In his new book, he focuses on another kind of contribution they make, one that, he argues, is as essential for prosperity as the products and services they create.

Successful entrepreneurship, he writes, requires a steady stream of innovations. The best places to develop them are privately funded research universities, medical centers and other kinds of institutions—like libraries and laboratories—that are insulated from competitive and political pressure. He cites, among other examples of nurtured innovation, the agricultural advances developed in land-grant universities during the 19th and 20th centuries and the contributions made to the information age by the students and faculty of Stanford University. As important as industrial research may be, the university has become, since the 1980s, "the source of new knowledge to be transferred to the private sector."

But there is more to the logic of entrepreneurial charity than hatching innovative ideas. As Mr. Acs notes, the success that certain entrepreneurs achieve when they disrupt old industries and establish new ones can bring big rewards, resulting in disparities of income and wealth. Without the philanthropy that would underwrite scholarships or other sources of opportunity, the public might not long tolerate such differences.

In "The Gospel of Wealth" (1889), Andrew Carnegie urged his prosperous contemporaries to avoid "hoarding great sums" and to give their "surplus" wealth away during their lifetimes, to strengthen an economic system that might thereby produce some riches for all. In the more measured tones of an economist, Mr. Acs is making much the same point: A capitalist economy not only enables but requires philanthropy. Through it, entrepreneurs can support the kinds of institutions that generate discoveries and that provide pathways for other people to make their own fortunes.

Mr. Acs buttresses his argument with a variety of examples, including those of billionaires—among them, Michael Milken and David Rubenstein —who have followed Bill Gates and Warren Buffett by committing themselves to giving at least half of their wealth to charity and whose charitable enterprises are aimed at creating opportunity for others. (Eli Broad, for instance, subsidizes charter schools and management reforms to improve urban education.) In Mr. Acs's view, America's ability to combine entrepreneurial capitalism and philanthropic uplift is rare among developed nations.
Andrew_Carnegie  billgates  book_reviews  books  capitalism  Colleges_&_Universities  David_Rubenstein  disequilibriums  disruption  Eli_Broad  entrepreneurship  innovation  knowledge_economy  moguls  Michael_Milken  philanthropy  society  Stanford  symbiosis  technology_transfers  Warren_Buffett 
march 2013 by jerryking
Compassionate Action - WSJ.com
February 24, 2003 | WSJ |By BENJAMIN S. CARSON.

In a conversation recently with Gerhardt Casper, the former president of Stanford University, I learned that they had 1,600 freshmen slots and 19,000 applicants for those slots, 10,000 of which had 4.0 grade point averages. They, along with the Ivy League schools and select others, could easily fill the freshman class with 4.0 students. But what about the black student who grew up in the ghetto, in a single-parent home, looking over his shoulder for danger each day as he walked home and still managed to compile a 3.7 GPA and SAT scores in the 90th percentile? Or what about the student from Appalachia with a similar academic record whose father died in a mining accident and had to work and help raise his brothers and sisters?

Do we simply ignore such students or assuage our guilt by saying they don't have to attend one of the premier schools since there are many other excellent universities that would love to have them? Of course not. Instead, many universities take into account factors such as parental education, socioeconomic status, obstacles overcome, learning environment, living environment, responsibilities, special family circumstances, etc., which allows these students admission. The universities correctly reason that if these students could overcome such significant adversities in their lives, they will likely make great contributions to our nation.

This is the principle we should call "compassionate action," and I believe it is the right one for our current dilemma: While race-neutral, it takes a disadvantaged background into account and extends a helping hand to those who need it most. As it turns out, in the U.S., the largest percentage of people from disadvantaged backgrounds happen to be blacks and Hispanics. Those groups will be given a slightly lower bar because of their real difficulties, not from a presumption that their skin color requires it.
affirmative_action  economically_disadvantaged  U.S._Supreme_Court  admissions  race-neutrality  Stanford  applications  SAT  education  students  compassion  Appalachia  disadvantages  GPA  presumptions 
august 2012 by jerryking
Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup - Class 11 Notes Essay
May 11, 2012 | Blake Masters

Where does the U.S. have the biggest comparative advantage in exports? Probably in agriculture. Looking into agricultural technology is counterintuitive for tech investors, since agriculture is often about as far removed from technology as possible. But that’s a good sign. It turns out that there is some very promising agritech development underway. Agritech may turn out to be a valuable secret that one might miss by not thinking about how people are talking (or not talking) about the economy.
Peter_Thiel  Stanford  law_schools  agriculture  farming  comparative_advantage 
june 2012 by jerryking
Stanford Dean Saloner on Teaching Innovation - WSJ.com
May 16, 2012 | WSJ |By PUI-WING TAM

Stanford Dean on Teaching the Skill Set of Innovation
By PUI-WING TAM
Stanford  innovation  Colleges_&_Universities  Pui-Wing_Tam  deanships  teaching 
may 2012 by jerryking
Come the Revolution - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: May 15, 2012

Private companies, like Phoenix, have been offering online degrees for a fee for years. And schools like M.I.T. and Stanford have been offering lectures for free online. Coursera is the next step: building an interactive platform that will allow the best schools in the world to not only offer a wide range of free course lectures online, but also a system of testing, grading, student-to-student help and awarding certificates of completion of a course for under $100. (Sounds like a good deal. Tuition at the real-life Stanford is over $40,000 a year.) Coursera is starting with 40 courses online — from computing to the humanities — offered by professors from Stanford, Princeton, Michigan and the University of Pennsylvania.

“The universities produce and own the content, and we are the platform that hosts and streams it,” explained Daphne Koller, a Stanford computer science professor who founded Coursera with Ng after seeing tens of thousands of students following their free Stanford lectures online.
distance_education  education  Stanford  Coursera  Colleges_&_Universities  Tom_Friedman  MOOCs 
may 2012 by jerryking
Cornell Gets $350 Million Gift for Bid for City Campus, and Stanford Bows Out - NYTimes.com
December 16, 2011, 2:56 pm
Cornell’s Bid for City Campus Gains and Stanford Bows Out
By RICHARD PéREZ-PEñA
Stanford  New_York_City  Colleges_&_Universities 
december 2011 by jerryking
WSJ: The Threat in the Air
The Threat in the Air

By AMY L. WAX
April 13, 2004; Page A20
Amy_Wax  testing  achievement_gaps  stereotypes  Stanford 
november 2011 by jerryking
Steve Jobs: 'Find What You Love' - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 6, 2011 | WSJ | Steve Jobs, who died Wednesday, reflected on his life, career and mortality in a well-known commencement address at Stanford University in 2005.
Steve_Jobs  commencement  speeches  Communicating_&_Connecting  Stanford 
october 2011 by jerryking
Stanford's SSE Labs Creating Entrepreneurial Buzz in Silicon Valley - WSJ.com
MAY 25, 2011 | WSJ | Scott Austin. SSE Labs is
drawing the attention of heavy-hitting investors in part because of its
direct ties to Stanford U., nesting ground to Cisco Systems Inc.,
Google., Sun Microsystems Inc., etc....the aim of the student-led SSE
Labs is to train students how to be leaders...SSE Labs chooses the
brightest founders from a large batch of applicants to participate in a
weeks-long mentoring program, in this case for the 3-month duration of
the fall, spring or summer sessions.
SSE Labs brings in a host of mentors—venture capitalists, angel
investors, lawyers, serial entrepreneurs—to provide advice, plus offers
customized classes around logistics (e.g. mktg., employment issues),free
web hosting via Amazon.com., and legal services from Dorsey &
Whitney. It also holds a "Demo Day," where its member companies pitch
to investors...SSE Labs does not taking any equity in the start-ups like
Y Combinator does.
silicon_valley  incubators  start_ups  Stanford  SSE_Labs  entrepreneur  Pat_Condon  founders 
may 2011 by jerryking
The Tech Profile: How a Small Retailer Handles I.T. - NYTimes.com
May 17, 2011 | NYT |By DAVID H. FREEDMAN
The business: JetPens, based in San Jose, Calif., is a 14-person online
retailer of mostly Japanese pens and pen-related paraphernalia. The
slick, slightly edgy Web site is packed with stuff that you won’t find
just anywhere, including pens designed specifically for drawing Japanese
Manga-style cartoon art and a five-function eraser. As a result,
JetPens has drawn a cult following and fills about 100,000 orders a
year.
running_a_business  marketing  retailers  e-commerce  David_Freedman  google  PayPal  Quickbooks  facebook  handwritten  analog  writing  artifacts  IT  owners  small_business  Japanese  premium  brands  Stanford  alumni 
may 2011 by jerryking
Stanford's Entrepreneurship Corner: Jack Dorsey, Square - The Power of Curiosity and Inspiration
Lecture by Jack Dorsey, creator of twitter and square, as part
of Stanford U.'s Entrepreneurship corner.
"Instrument" your company from Day 1. The 1st thing he did in square
(and not in twitter) is write an admin control panel for their servers.
Be a story teller. Inspire your team & your customers with a
story, your idea.
In the company, act as the editor, composing the stories.
The team you build is not permanent, different players will need to
enter & exit according to their profiles, the current story &
the "required edition".
Internal comms.: Everyone in the company will have the same
priorities.
External comms: You communicate with the product, your product is
"your story for your customers".
$ in the bank: The company needs it, firstly from investors and
secondly, and more critical, from revenue.
Limit the # of details. Those that stay need to be perfect.
Finally,"expect the unexpected and, whenever possible, be the
unexpected".
Stanford  entrepreneurship  Jack_Dorsey  start_ups  turning_your_team  Twitter  lessons_learned  entrepreneur  Square  control_systems  storytelling  dashboards  unexpected  instrumentation_monitoring  curiosity  inquisitiveness 
february 2011 by jerryking
Closing the Culture Gap
Spring 2006| Stanford Social Innovation Review. Stanford: Vol.
4, Iss. 1; pg. 71, 4 pgs| G Pascal Zachary. There is a a surprising
gap in the skill set of many foreign aid workers in Africa: a lack of
knowledge of the history, social practices, and thinking of the people
they've come to help. This culture gap proves costly time and again.
Africa  foreign_aid  culture  History  Stanford  G._PASCAL_ZACHARY 
march 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read