recentpopularlog in

jerryking : starbucks   27

Starbucks Is Not the Next Selma - WSJ
By Robert L. Woodson Sr.
April 29, 2018

What do the Starbucks protesters want? Who are the intended beneficiaries of their goals? Who are the losers?...It’s easy to see who benefits from this kind of response: The consultants who devise and conduct sensitivity-training sessions. The civil-rights organizations that will get money from donors anxious to relieve their white guilt. ..... Although many of the young protesters may authentically believe they are rallying for racial justice, they are in fact playing the role of the decoy. They are a useful diversion for those who reap the profits of the race-grievance industry. Similarly, the continuing mantra of racism serves as a shield for black officials in cities where black neighborhoods have declined and decayed.
African-Americans  civil_rights  grievances  Philadelphia  Starbucks  racial_sensitivity  white_guilt 
april 2018 by jerryking
Amazon’s Living Lab: Reimagining Retail on Seattle Streets
FEB. 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By NICK WINFIELD.

While Amazon has never articulated the grand strategy behind its expansion into physical stores, analysts and tech executives believe its goal is to capture a bigger share of some forms of shopping — food being the biggest — that may never move entirely online....the most obvious reason the company tries out new ideas in its own backyard is that it makes life easier for corporate leadership to see them in action without having to get on planes. Executives closely scrutinize how customers use new stores and tweak them as they gather data....Amazon Go customers enter the store through a gate with a smartphone app and simply walk out with their goods when they’re done.....Seattle has long been receptive to new ideas in retail. REI, Costco Wholesale and Nordstrom are among the store chains that got their start here.....One of Amazon’s more puzzling retail experiments in Seattle is the Treasure Truck, a roaming delivery truck retrofitted with carnival-style lights and signs, from which customers can pick up items offered during flash sales through the Amazon mobile app. The truck, which seems like the offspring of a billboard and an ice cream truck, has sold wild mahi-mahi steaks, paddle boards and Nintendo game consoles.
Seattle  Amazon  retailers  reimagining  convenience_stores  flash_sales  AmazonFresh  BOPIS  pop-ups  Starbucks  Amazon_Go  bricks-and-mortar  bookstores  experimentation  e-commerce  cashierless 
february 2017 by jerryking
Why Starbucks Might Be Innovating Too Fast - Barron's
By Alex Eule Jan. 26, 2017

Big Picture: Starbucks is seeing rapid success with its mobile ordering system, but it might be coming at the expense of in-store service.......The company now has so many customers placing advance orders via smartphones that some of its stores are having trouble keeping up.... “mobile order and pay” made up 7% of U.S. transactions in the latest quarter, up from just 3% a year ago.

But, it turns out, the existing stores haven’t been set up to handle the changing consumer behavior.

(From personal experience, I’ve noticed that Manhattan Starbucks counters are often over-filled with advance orders and those customers walk in and out, while the wait for in-store service is now longer than before.)

Starbucks president and chief operating officer Kevin Johnson, who’s set to become CEO in April, told investors that smartphone order volume has “created a new operational challenge...significant congestion at the handoff point. This congestion resulted in some number of customers who either entered the store or considered visiting a Starbucks store, and then did not complete a transaction.”
innovation  Starbucks  congestion  handoffs  in-store  order_management_system  mobile_applications  smartphones  consumer_behavior  operations  wait_times  brands  large_companies  shortcomings  revenge_effects  the_big_picture 
january 2017 by jerryking
Starbucks to Launch Express Stores - WSJ
By CHELSEY DULANEY
Updated Sept. 5, 2014

Starbucks Corp. SBUX +1.02% said Friday that it plans to cater to busy commuters by launching smaller, express-style stores.

The new stores will have reduced beverage and food menus and will integrate the company's digital payment and mobile ordering systems to speed up service, the company said.
Starbucks  product_launches 
september 2014 by jerryking
Starbucks can stomach Kraft $2.8-billion coffee jolt - The Globe and Mail
Kevin Allison
Starbucks can stomach Kraft $2.8-billion coffee jolt Add to ...
Subscribers Only

CHICAGO — Reuters Breakingviews

Published Wednesday, Nov. 13 2013,
Starbucks  Kraft  Pepsi  coffee  distribution_channels  disputes  grocery  supermarkets 
november 2013 by jerryking
Why retailers love customers who shop on their smartphones - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 18 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY.
The study found that, unsurprisingly, even the most plugged-in consumers do not tend to click on digital ads. Of the smartphone owners surveyed, two-thirds said they “rarely” or “never” click on online advertisements, with the minority reporting that they do so regularly. It helps when an ad is personalized. In that case, 49 per cent said they would regularly click on ads. But even then, just over half still said they would rarely or never consider it. The greatest opportunity for marketers is arguably not in advertising to those digitally connected consumers; it is in offering them something they will find useful....“We are witnessing a seismic change in consumer behaviour due to the emergence of social and digital platforms and the significance and ubiquity of mobile as a consumer platform,” Mr. Schultz told analysts on a conference call in April to discuss the company’s earnings. The data Starbucks can now collect on those users are crucial for it as a marketer.

“Retail has historically been a rather anonymous transaction for many,” said Lori Bieda, executive lead for consumer intelligence at SAS Canada. “… Mobile makes a consumer known to retailers.”...The SAS research showed that people want their phones to act as “personal shoppers.” Those surveyed said they would be more likely to return to a store that sent them offers on their mobile devices – but that’s highly contingent on those offers being relevant and targeted to that person’s preferences.
bricks-and-mortar  consumer_behavior  customer_loyalty  Indigo  market_research  mobile_applications  mobile_phones  online_advertising  personal_shoppers  retailers  seismic_shifts  smartphones  Starbucks  Susan_Krashinsky 
july 2013 by jerryking
Ken Lombard, on Staying a Student of Business - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
Published: July 6, 2013

When I go and speak to B-school students, the point I try to emphasize is, don’t stop being a student of the game. Don’t think that when you get out of this institution with your degree that now you walk on water. This should make you hungrier than you’ve ever been, because there are people who are coming out with fewer credentials who are very, very hungry....The time I spent working with Howard Schultz at Starbucks [as president of Starbucks Entertainment] was a tremendous learning experience for me in a lot of ways. He was very disciplined in that he was such a thorough and deep thinker, and would really commit to diving in and looking closely at any particular situation, and would turn over every stone. But he would not get stuck on the analysis side, and would have the guts to make the decision, and not accept the status quo....I’m a guy who comes from hard work, and I’m a guy who comes with an approach that says, before I make a tough decision, I want to be on the ground, I want to roll up my sleeves and understand the opportunity. While I understand that analysis tells you what you need to hear in how you need to structure a deal, there’s a difference between deal makers and analysts. Analysts can tell you everything wrong with the deal; the deal maker is going to try to figure out a way to come up with a structure that makes sense.

That doesn’t mean you should ignore what the numbers tell you, but you should try to figure out a structure that mitigates your downside. I try to make sure they understand that deal-making takes some guts. You can’t develop that in a short period. You have to be willing to go out and get the experience, and not think that this is going to happen for you overnight.

You can speed up the learning curve by positioning yourself in a way so people who have the experience want to help you. You have to make it conducive for them to really want to provide you with the information. Then become a sponge. That will help accelerate some of it. Go to someone who has done this before and try to get them to provide you with some guidance, so you’re not reinventing the wheel.
African-Americans  Magic_Johnson  commercial_real_estate  Starbucks  torchbearers  entrepreneur  dealmakers  deal-making  learning_curves  mentoring  life_long_learning  analysis  hard_work  Jason_Isaacs  risk-mitigation  staying_hungry  analysts  assessments_&_evaluations  playing_in_traffic  reinventing_the_wheel 
july 2013 by jerryking
Boss Talk: A New Test for Panera's Pay-What-You-Can
June 4, 2013| WSJ |By ANNIE GASPARRO.

Amid increasing competition, Panera's co-Chief Executive Ron Shaich has stepped up spending on marketing, added new menu categories like pasta and developed a vast loyalty program.

But perhaps the chain's biggest recent innovation was opening pay-what-you-can cafes—there are no set prices, just suggested donations—in markets that are struggling economically, such as Detroit and St. Louis. Three years into the experiment, the company now is testing one pay-what-you-can item—turkey chili in a bread bowl—at for-profit St. Louis stores, in hopes the idea will expand to all of its 1,700 outlets....
...WSJ: How has the competitive landscape changed in the fast-casual area?

Mr. Shaich: We were clearly the first people out there in the space. For at least five years, in the mid '90s, my stock was flat. I couldn't get anybody to see a place that existed between fast food and fine dining.

Basically, fast casual is us, Chipotle and Starbucks SBUX +1.09% . Probably between the three of us, we represent 95% of the sales that are considered fast casual.

WSJ: Do you expect a shakeout in the industry?

Mr. Shaich: There's always a continual shakeout going on; this is a dynamic industry. The reality is, what was good enough yesterday will not be good enough tomorrow.
fast-casual  restaurants  CEOs  Panera  innovation  experimentation  Detroit  good_enough  competitive_landscape  menus  new_categories  Chipotle  Starbucks  loyalty_management  shakeouts 
june 2013 by jerryking
Innovation in Private-Label Branding
Spring 2005 | Design Management Review | by Charlie Conn, Director of Branding, Proteus, Boston.

Success in private-label branding boils down to a retailer’s ability to build a brand and control and manage it on a local level to create relationships with consumers....others see innovation coming from the
private-label brands. By creating unique brand experiences for consumers, such retailers as Starbucks, Whole Foods Market, and Trader Joe’s have created truly innovative brands that encourage repeat purchases. From a private-labeling perspective, Starbucks is innovative because it provides exclusive,exclusive, private-label products that are in line with the lifestyle experience it has created. Starbucks reached the pinnacle of success in this area when
one of its exclusive private-label music CDs, “Ray Charles: Genius Loves Company,” won Album of the Year at the 2005 Grammy Awards,
after being nominated in 10 categories. This and other exclusive products contribute to the emotional benefits experienced by Starbucks’ customers, and as a result they contribute to the
bottom line. Private-label branding has been most prevalent
in supermarkets and drug chains. According to the Private Label Manufacturers Association, supermarkets rang in $42.9 billion in sales of store brands in 2003, representing 16.3 percent of overall sales.2 Drug chains reached an all-time high of $3.8 billion in store brand revenues that same year.3 In both sectors, growth of private label brands exceeded the growth of manufacturer brands....

“I’m not sanguine about the major supermarkets,” says Richard J. George, professor of food marketing at the Haub School of Business, Saint Joseph’s University, Philadelphia. “To be successful, supermarkets need to look to customers to determine the set of needs that can be uniquely satisfied. Brands are more than products on the shelf (national brand or private label.) Retailers are brands and need to focus on what the customer wants and how the retailer can positively differentiate the brand. It’s all about customers, not products. Retailers need to think like a brand and act like a retailer.”...A brand is more than just a name and logo. It’s a set of associations that lives in the consumer’s mind—the sum total of everything the brand represents for that consumer. To fully understand what a brand stands for—private-label or otherwise—retailers need to ask themselves:
• How appropriate is the brand?
• What makes it unique?
• Who are the target consumers?
• What functional, rational, and emotional
benefits does it offer consumers?
• How adaptable is it?
• Is it protectable?
Based on understanding these brand attributes, retailers can put some definitions around their positioning statements.
innovation  private_labels  branding  design  retailers  Starbucks  Whole_Foods  supermarkets  Trader_Joe's  brands  strategic_thinking  positioning 
august 2012 by jerryking
Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare as Corporate Focus Groups - NYTimes.com
By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
Published: July 30, 2012

Companies like Wal-Mart and Samuel Adams are turning social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare into extensions of market research departments. And companies are just beginning to figure out how to use the enormous amount of information available.... “There’s mountains and mountains of data being created in social media,” said Ravi Raj, vice president for products for @WalmartLabs, adding that the company used the data to decide what merchandise to carry where.

In one of its first analyses, performed last summer, @WalmartLabs found that cake pops — small bites of cake on lollipop sticks — were becoming popular. “Starbucks had just started getting them in their cafes, and people were talking a lot about it,” Mr. Raj said.

His team alerted merchants at Wal-Mart headquarters. The merchants had also heard about the product, and decided to carry cake-pop makers in Walmart stores. They were popular enough that the company plans to bring them back this holiday season.
Frito_Lay  Wal-Mart  market_research  social_media  focus_groups  data  merchandising  business_development  data_driven  Starbucks 
august 2012 by jerryking
The search for dark secrets - FT.com
November 28, 2005 | Financial Times | By Jeremy Grant

With the premium end of the US chocolate market growing at an annual compound rate of 15 per cent compared with 3 to 4 per cent for standard chocolate, Mars believes there is scope to sell high-quality chocolates in a café setting to a target group of relatively affluent people aged from 25 to 39.

Focus group work, and the number of young mothers visiting the Chicago stores with prams and strollers, tells Mars that most will be women. It is perhaps no coincidence that the name Ethel – that of the wife of Mars company founder and inventor of the Milky Way, Frank Mars – was chosen.
CAGR  cafés  chocolate  confectionery_industry  CPG  experimentation  gourmands  gourmet  high-end  high-growth  high-quality  market_research  Mars  niches  retailers  Starbucks  upscale  women 
july 2012 by jerryking
At Starbucks, Songs of Instant Gratification - New York Times
By MATT RICHTEL
Published: October 1, 2007

The mobile-payment technology can create a desensitizing and seductive purchase experience, said James Katz, director of the Center for Mobile Communications Studies at Rutgers University.
Starbucks  instant_gratification  music  e-commerce  buyer_choice_rejection  immediacy  purchase_decisions  VISA  mobile_phones  impulse_purchasing 
october 2011 by jerryking
Kraft Seeks Arbitration in Distribution Dispute With Starbucks - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 30, 2010 | WSJ | Paul Ziobro. Kraft Foods Inc.
launched arbitration proceedings against Starbucks Corp. on Monday,
challenging the coffee giant's plan to end a distribution deal with
Kraft.

The move will send the dispute between the two companies to an
arbitration panel as Starbucks looks to sever an arrangement it's had
with Kraft since 1998 to distribute Starbucks bagged coffee to
supermarket and other retailers.

Kraft is looking to enforce certain provisions of the deal, including
getting Starbucks to pay for ending a business that generated $500
million in annual revenue. Analysts have estimated that the business
could be valued north of $1.5 billion.
Kraft  Starbucks  arbitration  disputes  distribution_channels 
july 2011 by jerryking
When Latte Lost Its Luster
MARCH 29, 2011 | WSJ | By ROGER LOWENSTEIN. Oh, no—the aroma
from Starbucks's profitable breakfast sandwiches was masking the java's
ambrosial bouquet....Onward

By Howard Schultz
Rodale, 350 pages, $25.99
Roger_Lowenstein  Howard_Schultz  Starbucks  coffee  book_reviews 
april 2011 by jerryking
Indigo's Heather Reisman faces digital reckoning - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 08, 2011 Globe and Mail MARINA STRAUSS
Indigo has now arrived at its Starbucks moment, and Ms. Reisman knows
it. The wave of digital adoption that swept through music and video
retailing, decimating them, is now hitting book sellers, forcing them to
redefine their business model.
Indigo  Marina_Strauss  retailers  Starbucks  Heather_Reisman  digital_disruption  disruption  competitive_landscape 
april 2011 by jerryking
FT.com / Columnists / Lunch with the FT - Lunch with the FT: Howard Schultz
By John Gapper

Published: March 18 2011


Things are looking up again as Starbucks marks its 40th anniversary this
month and he has a book coming out about his return to the company and
the rebound, named with typical ebullience Onward: How Starbucks Fought
for Its Life without Losing Its Soul.
Howard_Schultz  Starbucks  profile  books  coffee 
march 2011 by jerryking
Coffee Break: Starbucks CEO Talks Prices, McDonald's - WSJ.com
MARCH 7, 2011 By JULIE JARGON.Coffee Talk: Starbucks Chief on Prices, McDonald's Rivalry
Howard_Schultz  Starbucks  coffee  MacDonald's  turnarounds  CEOs 
march 2011 by jerryking
"The Best Advice I Ever Got" - March 21, 2005
March 21, 2005 | Fortune Magazine | By INTERVIEWERS Julia Boorstin.

Brian Grazer
"My whole career has been built on one piece of advice that came from two people: [MCA founder] Jules Stein and [former MCA chairman] Lew Wasserman. In 1975 I was a law clerk at Warner Bros. I'd spent about a year trying to get a meeting with these two men. Finally they let me in to see them. They both said, separately, 'In order for you to be in the entertainment business, you have to have leverage. Since you have none--no money, no pedigree, no valuable relationships--you must have creative leverage. That exists only in your mind. So you need to write--put what's in your mind on paper. Then you'll own a piece of paper. That's leverage.'

"With that advice, I wrote the story that became Splash, which was a fantasy that I had about meeting a mermaid. For years, I sent registered letters to myself--movie concepts and other ideas--so that I had my ideas officially on paper. I have about 1,000 letters in a vault. To this day, I feel that my real power is only that--ideas and the confidence to write them down."
advice  career  inspiration  entrepreneur  Managing_Your_Career  Clayton_Christensen  humility  MBAs  Siemens  Salesforce  Mickey_Drexler  JetBlue  Peter_Drucker  Jim_Collins  Rick_Warren  leverage  Xerox  Andy_Grove  conventional_wisdom  Richard_Parsons  negotiations  Jack_Welch  Vivek_Paul  thinking  Starbucks  Warren_Bennis  Richard_Branson  Warren_Buffett  Brian_Grazer  creating_valuable_content  Lew_Wasserman 
december 2010 by jerryking
RETHINKING EVERY RULE OF REINVENTION
May 1, 2006 | Advertising Age | by Scott Bedbury. Great
brands like Nike and Starbucks have transcended the commodity nature of
their categories and become global brand leaders. Essential to both
brands is a nontraditional view toward marketing, particularly in the
area of consumer research, and a cultural commitment to risk taking and
the inevitable mistakes that happen through continuous innovation. For
these brands reinvention is not a one-time event but an ongoing
commitment. Here are four things to keep in mind as you consider ways to
reinvent your brand: 1. Study your competition above all else. 2. Test
your way into it. 3. Think in terms of current distribution. 4. Avoid
mistakes.
consumer_research  branding  risk-taking  incrementalism  innovation  reinvention  Nike  Starbucks  organizational_culture  brands  experimentation  trial_&_error  competition  distribution_channels 
january 2010 by jerryking
Hallmarks of an entrepreneur striving for gold
02-Aug-2005 | Financial Times pg. 8 | by John Mullins.

Entrepreneurs can succeed in difficult industries, but they must – among other things – be able to:

· Identify the critical success factors specific to their particular industry;

· Assemble a team that can deliver on these factors.

(1) Which decisions or activities are the ones that, if carried out wrong, will have crippling effects on company performance?
(2) Which decisions or activities, done right, will have a disproportionately positive effect on performance?
(3) In terms of skilful team-building, what skills do you have? Need?
disproportionality  entrepreneur  industry_expertise  ksfs  linchpins  jck  life_skills  online_travel  questions  rate-limiting_steps  site_selection  skills  skiing  Starbucks  start_ups  teams  think_threes  tourism 
march 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read