recentpopularlog in

jerryking : statistics_canada   11

Greenhouse Flower and Plant Production
Reference: 2006 and 2011 Census of Agriculture, Statistics Canada


Author :   Siva Mailvaganam - Statistician/OMAFRA
Last Reviewed :   15 July 2014
census  agriculture  Statistics_Canada  statistics 
august 2014 by jerryking
Where are the jobs? Without good stats, it’s bad data in, bad policy out - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 11 2014

The latest revelations of Ottawa’s cost-cutting on labour market data come as no surprise. This Conservative government has a solid track record of sacrificing information for budget cuts. The long-form census, Statistics Canada and Canada’s environmental libraries have all fallen victim to the government’s red pen. Frustratingly, these funding cuts only seem to come to light after they’ve been carried out.
data  budgets  Conservative_Party  Canada  Don_Drummond  cost-cutting  labour_markets  Statistics_Canada  policymaking  budget_cuts 
june 2014 by jerryking
Fighting fires with data: How killing the long-form census hurt community planning - The Globe and Mail
JOE FRIESEN - DEMOGRAPHICS REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, May. 14 2014

Most people use the company’s data in conjunction with a mapping tool and segmentation analysis, which sorts the population into lifestyle categories such as “Middleburg Managers” and “Young Digerati,” to better understand their habits and tastes. A library, for example, found that despite having a large population of senior citizens, programs advertised to “seniors” were a bust. Having looked more closely at their income and lifestyle data, they targeted the same group as “mature adults” and had much more success.

“Often, the real power is in the melding of the data. They know things about their users, but not their neighbourhood, then they marry them,” said Doug Norris, chief demographer at Environics Analytics.

Robert Dalgleish, an executive director at the United Church of Canada, is eagerly awaiting new data sorted down to the DA level. He said more than 500 local congregations in the church use this kind of data to better understand the areas they inhabit. One puzz-ling finding was that for every identified member of the United Church in a congregation, there are nine others living within a few kilometres who never attend a service.

“The data doesn’t give us answers, but it gives us really good questions,” Mr. Dalgleish said. “It really allows congregations to drill down into their communities.”
Joe_Friesen  demographic_changes  data  mapping  local  data_melding  neighbourhoods  market_segmentation  analytics  churches  Statistics_Canada  firefighting  Environs  customer_segmentation 
june 2014 by jerryking
Small Area Data
Environics Analytics 416.969.2733

"Due to changes in methodology, Statistics Canada is not officially releasing dissemination area (DA) data from the 2011 NHS. But we are"
neighbourhoods  data  analytics  Statistics_Canada  small_data  Environics 
may 2014 by jerryking
Family farms are fewer and larger, StatsCan says - The Globe and Mail
May. 10, 2012 | Globe and Mail | PAUL WALDIE.

Sparling noted that it takes about $2.31 worth of assets on a large farm to produce $1 of revenue. By contrast, a farm generating less than $100,000 in revenue requires $18 in assets to produce the same revenue....But not all of the changes have been welcomed. The demise of the Canadian Wheat Board, which had a monopoly over the sale of all wheat and barley grown in Western Canada, has prompted a series of court battles, led by farmers who believe the board gave grain growers clout in international markets. Others fear the shift to large farms will attract buying by investment funds eager to cash in on the rise in global food demand.

Still others worry about the age of Canadian farmers. The Statistics Canada census found that 48 per cent all farmers are 55 or older, the highest percentage ever. Meanwhile, the percentage of farm operators under 35 has fallen to 8.2 per cent from 9.1 per cent in 2006.
farming  Canadian  agriculture  trends  aging  Paul_Waldie  Statistics_Canada  consolidation 
may 2012 by jerryking
How crowd-sourcing will spark a data revolution
March 22, 2012 |Globe and Mail Blog | by frances woolley.

Yet all of these initiatives are geared towards government data sets and professional researchers. Important private records – diaries of early settlers, for example – can find a home in Canada’s National Archives. But the Archives do not have sufficient resources to process and document records of snowdrops or goldfinches. Moreover, the Archives keep records, not data sets – it is fascinating to look at census records from 120 years ago, but they aren’t much use for statistical analysis.

There is a solution: crowd-sourcing. Across the country there are students, amateur and professional historians, policy analysts, bloggers and data nerds. I’m one of them. I’ve taken data collected by a notable Ottawa record keeper, Mr. Harry Thomson, and posted it on Worthwhile Canadian Initiative. Mr. Thomson’s records go back to the 1960s, long before Environment Canada began collecting comparable hydrometric data. An analysis of the data shows a significant decline in peak water levels during the spring flood – with this year being no exception.

Yet Worthwhile Canadian Initiative is just one blog in the vast expanse of the World Wide Web, and might not even be there in five or ten year’s time. We need a permanent site for all of this data, through which the collective power of the internet can be unleashed – editing, compiling, analyzing, telling stories and, above all, building understanding.
analog  archives  Canadian  cannabis  census  crowdsourcing  data  data_driven  datasets  massive_data_sets  nerds  open_data  record-keeping  Statistics_Canada  unstructured_data 
march 2012 by jerryking
Earnings gap a 'troubling' trend - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 24, 2009 | Globe and Mail | by JOE FRIESEN AND TAVIA
GRANT. Much of the difficulty in finding a high-paying job that matches
an applicant's qualifications relates to the elusive Canadian experience
that employers seek. It's difficult to get a good job without Canadian
experience, but impossible to get that Canadian experience without first
getting a good job. "Their best chance at jobs are with people they
know, and very often their social networks are not very strong," Mr.
Jedwab said. "If your best connections are at a local restaurant ...
then you'll get a job at a restaurant."
immigrants  Toronto  Canada  productivity  TD_Bank  Statistics_Canada  Tavia_Grant  social_capital  social_networking  achievement_gaps  Joe_Friesen 
november 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read