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Opinion | Tech Loses a Prophet. Just When It Needs One.
Jan. 29, 2020 | The New York Times | By Kara Swisher, Ms. Swisher covers technology and is a contributing opinion writer.

* “How Will You Measure Your Life?” by Clay Christensen.
* The Intel founder and chief executive Andy Grove was a fan. So was the Apple legend Steve Jobs. Both men were doubtlessly attracted to the idea that start-ups made up of outsiders could find ways to create new markets and new value — and disrupt and overwhelm established companies.
* Professor Christensen’s formula was elegant: “First, disruptive products are simpler and cheaper; they generally promise lower margins, not greater profits. Second, disruptive technologies typically are first commercialized in emerging or insignificant markets. And third, leading firms’ most profitable customers generally don’t want, and indeed initially can’t use, products based on disruptive technologies.”
* though no fault of Professor Christensen’s, disruptive innovation took a turn for the worse in tech. Silicon Valley failed to marry disruption with a concept of corporate responsibility, and growth at all costs became its motto. The more measured approach that Professor Christensen taught was ignored.
* “It’s easier to hold your principles 100 percent of the time than it is to hold them 98 percent of the time.”
* “In fact, how you allocate your own resources can make your life turn out to be exactly as you hope or very different from what you intend.”
* “Decide what you stand for. And then stand for it all the time.”
advice  Andy_Grove  books  Clayton_Christensen  disruption  ideas  Kara_Swisher  principles  prophets  resource_allocation  self-help  Silicon_Valley  Steve_Jobs  technology  tributes 
27 days ago by jerryking
Dear Grads: How to Slay Dragons in the Business World
May 20, 2019 | WSJ | by Andy Kessler.

here’s my simple advice: Be a hero. You’ll have a job with a vague description. Sales. Physician assistant. Manager. Business intelligence. Everyone comes in with a task. Don’t let your job description be a straitjacket. Do something above and beyond. That’s what your employers want, whether they admit it or not.

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I’ve seen it again and again. I heard from a woman named Carol working in international marketing for a Midwest company. She was asked by a superior working on a board deck for a list of European competitors. She came up with a single PowerPoint slide that visually showed the reach of each competitor overlaid with her company’s distributors and analysis of how it could best compete. The slide was a huge hit. The chief operating officer thanked her. She got a raise and more responsibilities.

On Wall Street, I used to work with a salesman named Steve. A deal to raise money for a paper company was stuck. No one would touch it at $20. It was uglier than Dunder Mifflin. Steve had a new account in Milwaukee and insisted it buy several million shares, but at $18. On hearing someone was willing to buy, other accounts piled in. Steve is still known as the guy who got the ugly deal done—a hero.

Then there’s the coder, Paul. There were long discussions about how his company might get paid for its web service, but no solutions. “On a Friday,” Paul recalls, he sat down and invented one. “It seemed like an interesting problem, so one evening I implemented this content-targeting system, just as a sort of side project, not because I was supposed to.” What became known as AdSense morphed into a $115 billion business. Paul Buchheit was employee No. 23 at Google. He also developed Gmail. Giga-hero.

You don’t have to save a baby from a fire. In Silicon Valley there’s a saying about pain killers versus vitamins: Either save costs or generate revenue. You can be a hero either way.

Another easy route to heroism: Every company has particularly nasty clients. They don’t return calls and they badmouth your products. Everyone avoids them. Instead, go for it. Roll up your sleeves and find something you have in common with them. Better yet, find their weakness. Horse racing. Wilco. Anime. You’ll own them.
advice  Andy_Kessler  Colleges_&_Universities  commencement  first90days  high-achieving  howto  new_graduates  overachievers  painkillers  pain_points  speeches  Steve_Jobs  vitamins 
july 2019 by jerryking
How to keep creative geniuses in check and in profit
March 10, 2019 | Financial Times | by Andrew Hill.

The story of how Eastman Kodak invented a digital camera in 1975 but failed to develop it is one of the most notorious misses in the annals of innovation. (It’s more complicated than that, but never mind.)

Polaroid, the instant-photo pioneer, took a slower path to the technology: its first digital camera appeared only in 1996. It filed for bankruptcy in 2001, 11 years before Kodak.
Polaroid’s founding genius, Edwin Land, could, though, have been first to the digital party. In 1971, as part of a secret panel advising the US president, he advocated digital photography, which the US eventually adopted for its spy satellites.
But Land was blind to the promise of digital cameras for the consumer.

This tale of failures of leadership, innovation and organisation is well told by Safi Bahcall, a physicist, former consultant and biotech entrepreneur, in Loonshots. There are four types of failure:
(1) Leadership failure. Edwin Land was guilty of leading his company into a common trap: only ideas approved by an all-powerful leader advance until at last a costly mis-step trips up the whole company.
(2) Innovation failure. Bahcall distinguishes between product-type and strategy-type innovation. Classic P-type innovators are the folks at innovation conferences conversing about new gadgets with less attention being paid to the analysis of innovative business models. Indeed, at some forums, P-type innovations also crowd the lobby. Delegates line up to try the latest shiny robot, electric car, or 3D printer.

(3) Organizational failure. Loonshots is based, refreshingly, on the idea culture does not necessarily eat strategy for breakfast. In fact, bad structure eats culture. Bahcall gives this a scientific foundation, explaining that successful teams and companies stagnate in the same way water turns to ice. A perfectly balanced innovative company must try to keep the temperature at the point where free-flowing bright ideas are not suddenly frozen by bureaucracy. How? Since the success of Bell Labs, companies have been told they should set up “a department of loonshots run by loons, free to explore the bizarre” separately from the parent. The key, though, is to ensure chief executives and their managers encourage the transfer of ideas between the mad creatives in the lab and the people in the field, and (the culture part) ensure both groups feel equally loved.

As for the assumption companies always ossify as they get larger, that risk can be mitigated by adjusting incentives, curbing office politics, and matching skills to projects, for which Loonshots offers a detailed formula.

Success also requires a special type of leader — not a visionary innovator but a “careful gardener”, who nurtures the existing franchise and the new projects. Though not himself an inventor, Steve Jobs, in his second phase at Apple, arguably achieved the right balance. He also spotted the S-type potential of iTunes. Even if Tesla’s Elon Musk is not losing that balance, in his headlong, top-down pursuit of loonshot after loonshot, he does not strike me as a born gardener.

Persuading charismatic geniuses to give up their role as leaders of organisations built on their inventions is hard. Typically, such people figure out themselves how to garden, as Jobs did; or they are coached by the board, which may install veteran executives to help; or they may be handed the title of “chief innovator” or “chief scientist” and nudged aside for a new CEO.

(4) They may find themselves peddling a fatally flawed product.
Bell_Labs  books  breakthroughs  business_models  creativity  digital_cameras  Edwin_Land  Elobooks  Elon_Musk  failure  genius  howto  incentives  innovation  inventors  Kodak  leaders  moonshots  office_politics  organizational_failure  organizational_innovation  Polaroid  product-orientated  Steve_Jobs 
march 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Luke Perry Had a Stroke and Died. I Had One and Lived.
March 5, 2019 | The New York Times | By Kara Swisher, Contributing Opinion Writer.

Kara Swisher was 49 years old, healthy and had none of the conditions--symptoms--like high blood pressure that might predict a stroke...yet she had one after arriving in Hong Kong after a long flight...not hydrating or walking around enough on the long flight to Hong Kong, created what the doctor, who immediately started the treatment of anticoagulant drugs and others, called a “hole in one.”.....The idea of death — the absolute nearness of it — has been ever-present for Kara Swisher. Since her dad died, she's lived her life as if she had no time at all or very little, making the kinds of choices of someone who knew that tomorrow might indeed be her last.

[Stanford University in 2005 by the Apple founder and tech visionary Steve Jobs:

For the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been no for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure — these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.]

.....Sometimes {Steve Jobs'] urgency manifested itself in inspiration, sometimes in meanness, sometimes in humor, sometimes in seriousness. But it was always urgent.......[recast in my words...I have both the privilege to live more days on earth and the awareness that those days are limited.

Be tough-minded going forward--Basically, I don’t have the time to be so careless in what I do and I don’t have the time to not to ask the same of you.].........You get this kind of nudge again and again from death. It is, as the Buddhist teacher Frank Ostaseski noted, “a secret teacher hiding in plain sight.” Luke Perry’s death was yet another lesson from that teacher. ....... Mr. Perry’s Dylan McKay, who was given to saying things like, “The only person you can trust in this world is yourself.”
'90s  actors  hydration  Kara_Swisher  Luke_Perry  midlife  mini-stroke  mybestlife  op-ed  tips  speeches  Stanford  Steve_Jobs  strokes  symptoms  television  travel  It's_up_to_me  urgency  long-haul  deaths 
march 2019 by jerryking
Steve Jobs and Bill Gates: What happened when Microsoft saved Apple
29 Aug 2017 | CNBC | by Catherine Clifford.

Steve Jobs and Bill Gates' rivalrous friendship is the stuff of tech lore. The most poignant moment of that fraught relationship happened 20 years ago. In August of 1997, Gates stepped in and saved Apple, which, at the time, was on the brink of bankruptcy.

"Bill, thank you. The world's a better place," Jobs told Gates after the Microsoft exec agreed to make a $150 million investment in Apple.
Apple  billgates  Microsoft  Steve_Jobs 
december 2018 by jerryking
Why big companies squander good ideas
August 6, 2018 | | Financial Times | Tim Harford

.....Organisations from newspapers to oil majors to computing giants have persistently struggled to embrace new technological opportunities, or recognise new technological threats, even when the threats are mortal or the opportunities are golden. Why do some ideas slip out of the grasp of incumbents, then thrive in the hands of upstarts?.....“Disruption describes what happens when firms fail because they keep making the kinds of choices that made them successful,” says Joshua Gans, an economist at the Rotman School of Management in Toronto and author of The Disruption Dilemma. Successful organisations stick to their once-triumphant strategies, even as the world changes around them. More horses! More forage!

Why does this happen? Easily the most famous explanation comes from Clayton Christensen of Harvard Business School. Christensen’s 1997 book, The Innovator’s Dilemma, told a compelling story about how new technologies creep up from below: they are flawed or under-developed at first, so do not appeal to existing customers. Holiday snappers do not want to buy digital cameras the size of a shoebox and the price of a car.

However, Christensen explains, these technologies do find customers: people with unusual needs previously unserved by the incumbent players. The new technology gets better and, one day, the incumbent wakes up to discover that an upstart challenger has several years’ head start — and once-loyal customers have jumped ship.
............Within academia, Rebecca Henderson’s ideas about architectural innovation are widely cited, and she is one of only two academics at Harvard Business School to hold the rank of university professor. The casual observer of business theories, however, is far more likely to have heard of Clayton Christensen, one of the most famous management gurus on the planet.

That may be because Christensen has a single clear theory of how disruption happens — and a solution, too: disrupt yourself before you are disrupted by someone else. That elegance is something we tend to find appealing.

The reality of disruption is less elegant — and harder to solve. Kodak’s position may well have been impossible, no matter what managers had done. If so, the most profitable response would have been to vanish gracefully.

“There are multiple points of failure,” says Henderson. “There’s the problem of reorganisation. There’s the question of whether the new idea will be profitable. There are cognitive filters. There is more than one kind of denial. To navigate successfully through, an incumbent organisation has to overcome every one of these obstacles.”

......Henderson added that the innovators — like Fuller — are often difficult people. “The people who bug large organisations to do new things are socially awkward, slightly fanatical and politically often hopelessly naive.” Another point of failure......The message of Henderson’s work with Kim Clark and others is that when companies or institutions are faced with an organisationally disruptive innovation, there is no simple solution. There may be no solution at all. “I’m sorry it’s not more management guru-ish,” she tells me, laughing. “But anybody who’s really any good at this will tell you that this is hard.”
Apple  blitzkrieg  disruption  ideas  IBM  innovation  iPod  missed_opportunities  hard_work  Rotman  Steve_Jobs  theory  Tim_Harford  upstarts  large_companies  WWI  Xerox  Walkman  Clayton_Christensen  organizational_change  organizational_structure  MPOF  militaries  digital_cameras 
september 2018 by jerryking
Opinion | The Man Who Changed the World, Twice - The New York Times
May 8, 2018 | NYT | by David Brooks.
This column is about a man, Stewart Brand, who changed the world, at least twice. I want to focus less on the impact of his work, which is all around us, and more on how he did it, because he’s a model of how you do social change.....In 1965, Brand created a multimedia presentation called “America Needs Indians,” which he performed at the LSD-laced, proto-hippie gatherings he helped organize in California.

Brand then had two epiphanies. First, there were no public photos of the entire earth. Second, if people like him were going to return to the land and lead natural lives, they would need tools......launched the the “Whole Earth Catalog.”....the Catalog....was also a bible for what would come to be known as the counterculture, full of reading lists and rich with the ideas of Buckminster Fuller and others........When a culture changes, it’s often because a small group of people on society’s margins find a better way to live, parts of which the mainstream adopts. Brand found a magic circle in the Bay Area counterculture. He celebrated it, publicized it, gave it a coherence it otherwise lacked and encouraged millions to join.....The communes fizzled. But on the other side of the Bay Area, Brand sensed another cultural wave building-- computers!! Brand and others imagined computers launching a consciousness revolution — personal tools to build neural communities that would blow the minds of mainstream America. [See Fred Turner says in “From Counterculture to Cyberculture,” ].......Brand played cultural craftsman once again, as a celebrity journalist. In 1972 he wrote a piece for Rolling Stone announcing the emergence of a new outlaw hacker culture..... Brand is a talented community architect. In the 1970s, he was meshing Menlo Park computer geeks with cool hippie types. The tech people were entranced by “Whole Earth,” including Steve Jobs....In 1985, Brand and Larry Brilliant helped create the Well, an early online platform (like Usenet) where techies could meet and share. .......Brand’s gift, Frank Foer writes in “World Without Mind,” is “to channel the spiritual longings of his generation and then to explain how they could be fulfilled through technology.” Innovations don’t just proceed by science alone; as Foer continues, “the culture prods them into existence.”....... Brooks argues that the computer has failed as a source of true community. Social media seems to immiserate people as much as it bonds them. And so there’s a need for future Brands, young cultural craftsmen who identify those who are building the future, synthesizing their work into a common ethos and bringing them together in a way that satisfies the eternal desire for community and wholeness.

===========================================
Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind. Unable to compete when it comes to calculation, the best workers will come with heart in hand.
David_Brooks  Stewart_Brand  community_builders  product_launches  counterculture  community_organizing  Silicon_Valley  '70s  trailblazers  social_change  role_models  via:marshallk  hackers  social_media  Steve_Jobs  books 
may 2018 by jerryking
Ten Ways Ridiculously Successful People Think Differently
December 4, 2017 | LinkedIn | Dr. Travis Bradberry Influencer.

Obstacles do not block the path; they are the path. This perspective helps successful people to think differently to everyone else, which is important, because if you think like everyone else, no matter how smart or experienced you are, you’ll hit the same ceiling. By thinking outside the box and going against the grain, successful people rise above their limitations.

They’re confident.
They’re composed. They know that no matter how good or bad things get, everything changes with time. All they can do is to adapt and adjust to stay happy and in control.

They’re honest.

They seek out small victories.

They’re always learning.

They expose themselves to a variety of people. There’s no easier way to learn to think differently than spending time with someone whose strengths are your weaknesses or whose ideas are radically different from your own. This exposure sparks new ideas and makes you well rounded. This is why we see so many great companies with co-founders who stand in stark contrast to each other. Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak from Apple were a prime example. Neither could have succeeded without the other.

They keep an open mind.

They’re fearless.

They turn tedious tasks into games.

They dream big but remain grounded.
affirmations  thinking_big  gamification  self-confidence  fearlessness  self-control  honesty  Steve_Jobs  heterogeneity  incrementalism  negative_space  open_mind  think_differently  small_wins  quick_wins 
may 2018 by jerryking
Daring rather than data will save advertising
John Hegarty JANUARY 2, 2017

Algorithms are killing creativity, writes John Hegarty

Ultimately, brands are built by talking to a broad audience. Even if part of that audience never buys your product. Remember, a brand is made not just by the people who buy it, but also by the people who know about it. Fame adds value to a brand, but to build it involves saying something that captures the public’s imagination. It needs to broadcast.

Now, data are fundamentally important in the building of a market. “Big data” can provide intelligence, gather information, identify buying patterns and determine certain outcomes. But what it cannot do is create an emotional bond with the consumer. Data do not make magic. That is the job of persuasion. And it is what makes brands valuable...... Steve Jobs or James Dyson did not build brilliant companies by waiting for a set of algorithms to tell them what to do.

Persuasion and promotion.

In today’s advertising world, creativity has taken a back seat. Creativity creates value and with it difference. And difference is vital for giving a brand a competitive edge. But the growing belief in “data-only solutions” means we drive it out of the marketplace.

If everything ends up looking the same and feeling the same, markets stagnate.
advertising  Steve_Jobs  creativity  human_ingenuity  data  massive_data_sets  data_driven  brands  emotional_connections  persuasion  ingenuity  daring  algorithms 
february 2018 by jerryking
Biographer Walter Isaacson explains what made Leonardo da Vinci a genius - The Globe and Mail
RUSSELL SMITH
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED DECEMBER 4, 2017

What we can learn from Leonardo constitutes the peculiar last chapter of this otherwise sober and cautious biography. At its end Isaacson moves from his role as historian into something closer to self-help guru. He lists a set of Leonardish attributes for us to emulate that sound a lot like advice to tech startups: "Retain a childlike sense of wonder… Think visually… Avoid silos… Collaborate…" Add this to repeated comparisons to Steve Jobs, a previous biographee of Isaacson's, and one is reminded that this is a very American biography (Isaacson was managing editor of Time magazine for years), one that sees "creativity" as primarily a corporate asset.
Russell_Smith  books  biographies  genius  Leonardo_da_Vinci  Walter_Isaacson  Steve_Jobs  polymaths  foxes  hedgehogs  renaissance  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  generalists  curiosity  creativity  collaboration  silo_mentality 
december 2017 by jerryking
Degrees of separation - FT.com
February 26, 2016 | FT | Jonathan Derbyshire.

The best work is created within an interaction between two subjects. Take Zuckerberg - computer science + psychology = billionaire. Even having a broad knowledge of various subjects enables an entrepreneur to flourish.

Moral of the story............keep learning.

ReportShare6RecommendReply
apt-get 1 day ago
@Sunny spot on. Liberal arts, STEM...these are just starting points. Continual learning and diversity of knowledge are considerably more powerful.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++
From David Brooks....Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind.
liberal_arts  STEM  billgates  Steve_Jobs  Colleges_&_Universities  CEOs  career_paths  cross-disciplinary  Vinod_Khosla  intellectual_diversity 
february 2016 by jerryking
Why not giving a damn won’t stand in your way of success - FT.com
June 14, 2015 1:02 pm
Why not giving a damn won’t stand in your way of success
Lucy Kellaway
James_Althucher  Lucy_Kellaway  Steve_Jobs  Martin_Sorrell 
june 2015 by jerryking
Apple’s Jony Ive is tired of having to design everything - FT.com
May 29, 2015 4:50 pm
Apple’s Jony Ive is tired of having to design everything
John Gapper
design  Apple  Jonathan_Ive  Steve_Jobs 
june 2015 by jerryking
In the Age of Information, Specializing to Survive - NYTimes.com
By J. PEDER ZANEMARCH 19, 2015

Artists from Picasso to Bob Dylan and entrepreneurs including Bill Gates and Steve Jobs changed the world by finding “radically new ways of looking at old problems,” Mr. Galenson said. “They cut through all the accumulated stuff — forget what’s been done — to see something special, something new.”

It is why, Mr. Galenson added, the historian and physicist Stanley Goldberg said of Einstein, “It was almost as if he were wearing special glasses to make all that was irrelevant invisible."
polymaths  Renaissance  information_overload  fresh_eyes  specialization  sense-making  reconceptualization  Pablo_Picasso  Bob_Dylan  billgates  Steve_Jobs 
march 2015 by jerryking
Four Ways to Innovate Through Analogies - WSJ - WSJ
By JOHN POLLACK
Nov. 7, 2014 | WSJ |

Here are four rules for innovating through analogy.

(1) Question conventional analogies. Always kick the tires on the analogies you encounter or consider. Some analogies ring true at first but fall apart on closer examination.
(2) Explore multiple analogies. No matter how seductive an analogy may be, be sure to examine several others before deciding which one might be most useful. Usually, more than one analogy can shed light on a given situation.
(3) Look to diverse sources. The art of analogy flows from creative re-categorization and the information that we extract from surprising sources
(4) Simplify. Similarly, Steve Jobs recognized that the digital “desktop,” first developed but unappreciated at Xerox PARC, was an analogy with the potential to make computers accessible to millions of people—an insight he put to work when he launched the first Mac.
storytelling  pattern_recognition  innovation  analogies  simplicity  Charles_Darwin  theory  theory_of_evolution  conventional_wisdom  Steve_Jobs  under_appreciated  Xerox 
november 2014 by jerryking
Elegant and unexpected: What Steve Jobs can teach you about strategy - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY D. SHERMAN
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 16 2014
Apple  Steve_Jobs  strategy 
may 2014 by jerryking
Yes, the Wealthy Can Be Deserving
FEB. 15, 2014 | NYT | By N. GREGORY MANKIW.

Actors, authors, and athletes do not make up the entire ranks of the rich. Most top earners make their fortunes in ways that are less transparent to the public.... the most natural explanation of high C.E.O. pay is that the value of a good C.E.O. is extraordinarily high.

That is hardly a surprise. A typical chief executive is overseeing billions of dollars of shareholder wealth as well as thousands of employees. The value of making the right decisions is tremendous. Just consider the role of Steve Jobs in the rise of Apple and its path-breaking products....A similar case is the finance industry, where many hefty compensation packages can be found. There is no doubt that this sector plays a crucial economic role. Those who work in banking, venture capital and other financial firms are in charge of allocating the economy’s investment resources. They decide, in a decentralized and competitive way, which companies and industries will shrink and which will grow. It makes sense that a nation would allocate many of its most talented and thus highly compensated individuals to the task.
high_net_worth  income_distribution  winner-take-all  the_one_percent  CEOs  compensation  private_equity  income_inequality  talent  breakthroughs  Steve_Jobs  finance  capital_allocation  decision_making 
february 2014 by jerryking
Do Things that Don't Scale
July 2013 | Paul Graham

The question to ask about an early stage startup is not "is this company taking over the world?" but "how big could this company get if the founders did the right things?" And the right things often seem both laborious and inconsequential at the time.
advice  start_ups  Y_Combinator  Paul_Graham  scaling  recruiting  experience  management_consulting  barriers_to_entry  product_launches  partnerships  customer_acquisition  user_growth  Steve_Jobs  unscalability  founders  questions 
november 2013 by jerryking
The Four Best (and Worst) Uses of Market Research| Page 2
April 9 2013 | | ChiefExecutive.net | Chief Executive Magazine | by Taddy Hall

Experience and research suggest that CEOs of many companies look for growth in the wrong places and in the wrong ways, thereby missing opportunities and leaving them for the newbies. In a sense, though, this is good news: success lies in doing things differently, not spending more.

Specifically, there are four approaches organizations often take, none of which reliably lead to the actionable insights business leaders need:

Seek and profile large, growing and profitable markets
Solicit feedback from current best customers
Segment markets based on customer attributes, such as demographics, or based on product characteristics like “high end” vs. “low end,” “regular” vs. “light,” etc.
Benchmark progress against competitors

In each case, it is easy to see why an industry leader might have interest in the findings; however, these outputs speak primarily to aspects of the existing business or to the franchises of other established players. In other words, mapping current demand reveals little to nothing of the less-visible latent demand that is essential fuel for transformational innovation. As Henry Ford mused a hundred years ago: if he’d asked folks what they wanted, they would have asked for faster horses. Echoing Ford, Steve Jobs noted that consumers can’t describe what they’ve never experienced.
market_research  disruption  Clayton_Christensen  high-end  latent  insights  growth  opportunities  transformational  customer_insights  innovation  large_markets  market_segmentation  customer_risk  actionable_information  hidden  Henry_Ford  Steve_Jobs  market_share  static  dynamic  segmentation  missed_opportunities  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  unarticulated_desires 
april 2013 by jerryking
If You Were the Next Steve Jobs...
September 3, 2012 | Harvard Business Review | by Umair Haque.

Imagine, for a moment, that you (yes, you) were the next Steve Jobs: what would your (real) challenges be? I'd bet they wouldn't be scale (just call FoxConn), efficiency (call FoxConn's consultants), short-term profitability (call FoxConn's consultants' bankers), or even "growth" (call FoxConn's consultants' bankers' lobbyists). Those are the problems of yesterday — and today, here's the thing: we largely know how to solve them.

Whether you're an assiduous manager, a chin-stroking economist, a superstar footballer, or a rumpled artist, here's the unshakeable fact: you don't get to tomorrow by solving yesterday's problems.

To solve today's set of burning problems, you just might have to build new institutions, capable of handling stuff a little something like this...
Singularity. Scale is a solved problem. We know how to do stuff at very, very large scale — if by stuff you mean "churning out the same widget, a billion times over". What we don't know how to do is the opposite of scaling up: scaling down an institution, to make a difference to a human life.
Sociality - something resembling the advanced dating stage of the courtship ritual.
Spontaneity - the act of human potential unfurling in the moment — and if it's human potential you wish to ignite, then it's spontaneity you need to spark.
what distinguishes organizations that achieve enduring greatness is teamwork and collaboration — and those are words so overused, they make my teeth ache just saying them. Here's my bet: it's time to drop the fourth wall of the "team" — and go beyond collaboration, to something like what Jung called synchronicity: a kind of uncanny intersection of seemingly unrelated lives.
Solubility. But the biggest lesson — and the one hidden in plain sight — is this: creating institutions capable of not just solving the same old problems, forever.... the greatest challenge for tomorrow's would-be problem-solver renegades is this: building institutions that don't keep solving the same old solved problems, like profitability, scale, efficiency, productivity, and the like. Over and over again, like algorithms of human organization run amok. Institutions that are capable of taking a hard look at unsolved problems around the globe — as big as climate change, sending humans to Mars, and redesigning the global financial system, and as small as Umair's perfect coffee — and then accepting the difficult, often painful, always fulfilling, work of attempting to solve them.
living_in_the_moment  creativity  Steve_Jobs  HBR  problems  problem_solving  umairhaque  political_infrastructure  ideas  value_creation  wealth_creation  threats  scaling  institutions  spontaneity  human_potential  superstars  financial_system 
february 2013 by jerryking
Michael Malone: Steve Jobs and the Death of the Personal Computer - WSJ.com
August 31, 2011 | WSJ | By Michael Malone.

Steve Jobs and the Death of the Personal Computer
Even Hewlett-Packard is out of the game.
Steve_Jobs  HP  Michael_Malone 
april 2012 by jerryking
How Schools Can Teach Innovation - WSJ.com
April 13, 2012 | WSJ | By TONY WAGNER.
Educating the Next Steve Jobs
How can schools teach students to be more innovative? Offer hands-on classes and don't penalize failure
education  students  innovation  failure  teaching  teachers  Steve_Jobs  high_schools 
april 2012 by jerryking
Steve Jobs’s Real Genius
November 14, 2011 | : The New Yorker|by Malcolm Gladwell
Steve_Jobs  Malcolm_Gladwell 
november 2011 by jerryking
Crovitz: Steve Jobs's Advice for Obama - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 31, 2011

Steve Jobs's Advice for Obama
Apple's founder on Obama: "The president is very smart, but he kept explaining to us reasons why things can't get done. It infuriates me."

By L. GORDON CROVITZ
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Obama  Steve_Jobs  advice  L._Gordon_Crovtiz 
november 2011 by jerryking
J.Crew CEO Mickey Drexler on what he learned from Steve Jobs - The Globe and Mail
kyle pope
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011 1:40PM EDT
Last updated Friday, Oct. 28, 2011

You’ve talked about Apple a lot. You’re on its board and knew Steve Jobs. Have you learned a lot from them in terms of running your business? Even if I wasn’t on their board, I would learn a lot from them. I’m looking for best practices constantly. Apple has beautiful design, beautiful product, incredibly functional. But mostly it’s about picking product, getting behind it, marketing it and introducing it to a customer. What they’ve done just inspires me. Picking the best isn’t easy, by the way. It takes guts and it takes intuition. Apple does that brilliantly. It helps me in my everyday thinking.

Apple creates demand for things people didn’t even know they wanted. How does that apply to J.Crew? That was Steve’s favourite line—that customers don’t know what they want unless you show it to them. It’s about how you read the business. If you’re looking at the business right, in fashion or anything else, you’re reading the rhythm of the selling report, [and]you kind of know when the slowdown is coming. The job is to then invest in where it’s going. If you market it and you show it and they don’t want it, you lose. End of argument. You can’t argue too much with the customer.
Apple  creating_demand  retailers  Mickey_Drexler  J.Crew  Steve_Jobs  CEOs  lessons_learned  fast-fashion  unarticulated_desires 
october 2011 by jerryking
Jobs, no ordinary CEO, leaves no ordinary company
Oct 5, 2011 | Reuters Breakingviews |By Robert Cyran and Richard Beales.

Steve Jobs has died at 56. He was no ordinary chief executive, and he leaves no ordinary company. The force behind the iPod, iPhone and iPad not only co-founded and then rescued Apple, building it into the most valuable tech company on the planet, worth some $350 billion. He also changed the way people live. It’s a rare entrepreneur who leaves that legacy – and a company that can thrive without him.

Jobs dropped out of college. And he was forced out of Apple less than a decade after starting it with Steve Wozniak having lost his fight to promote new Macintosh computers instead of more profitable, less capable machines. But these moments of change proved central to his later success. In a 2005 Stanford commencement address, Jobs talked of how, for example, calligraphy classes he took after dropping out of college influenced the design of the Macintosh, arguably Apple’s first world-changing device.

He was always ready to move on. He called being fired from Apple “the best thing that could have ever happened to me.” It’s easy to forget that Jobs built Pixar, the astonishingly successful computer animation company, while in exile from Apple. Even before Pixar, he founded Next Computer, making devices with an operating system far ahead of its time. This played a role in Apple’s success after 1996 when it bought Next, bringing Jobs back into the fold.

Along with the vision, drive and perfectionism that led to a string of successful products, Jobs did bring a less desirable cult of secrecy to Apple after his return. In one sense, it served the company well – when the iPhone landed and showed the world the real potential of smartphones, it shocked the industry. It was, as an observer put it at the time, “like it dropped out of a wormhole from the future.” But in handling the boss’s health problems in recent years, Apple’s tight-lipped nature caused investors to get less information than they deserved.

Even so, the company’s greatest success, the iPhone, was developed after Jobs had survived the initial onslaught of cancer. And Apple just this year became the most valuable company in America for a time, and its market value now only just lags Exxon Mobil’s. By some measures, Jobs’ creation ought to be worth much more. The success of its latest category-creating product, the iPad, means its growth potential remains powerful. And the company has an impressive array of talent even without him.

“Don’t be trapped by dogma,” Jobs told that graduating Stanford class. “Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice.” Apple is a legacy in itself, but it’s the devices born of that philosophy that arguably matter most. Like all great inventors, Jobs created things that people didn’t even know they wanted – until millions of them just had to have them.
Apple  Steve_Jobs  tight-lipped  tributes 
october 2011 by jerryking
The Inventor Of the Future
By Lev Grossman; Harry McCracken Monday, Oct. 17, 2011
Steve_Jobs  future  inventors 
october 2011 by jerryking
Daily Newspaper
American Icon | TIME |By Walter Isaacson
Steve_Jobs  Walter_Isaacson 
october 2011 by jerryking
Crovitz: Steve Jobs and the Future of Newspapers - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 9, 2011 | WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ.

Steve Jobs and the Future of Newspapers
He loved the printed product but told me 'our lives are not like that anymore.'
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Steve_Jobs  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  future  newspapers 
october 2011 by jerryking
Steve Jobs and the Power of Taking the Big Chance - NYTimes.com
By STEVE LOHR
Published: October 8, 2011

DO WHATEVER IT TAKES TO DELIGHT CUSTOMERS
GOOD IDEAS TAKE TIME
DON’T DWELL ON MISTAKES.
PASSION COUNTS FOR A LOT
Steve_Jobs  Steve_Lohr  lessons_learned  risk-taking  failure  mistakes  passions  delighting_customers 
october 2011 by jerryking
David Gelernter: Steve Jobs and the Coolest Show on Earth - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 6, 2011 | WSJ | By DAVID GELERNTER

Steve Jobs and the Coolest Show on Earth
Like everyone who counts most in the world, he made himself up as he went along, occupied a job category whose total size was always one.
Steve_Jobs  one-of-a-kind  iconoclasts 
october 2011 by jerryking
Steve Jobs: Designer First, C.E.O. Second - NYTimes.com
October 6, 2011, 1:37 pm
Steve Jobs: Designer First, C.E.O. Second
By NICK BILTON
design  Steve_Jobs  CEOs 
october 2011 by jerryking
Steve Jobs: 'Find What You Love' - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 6, 2011 | WSJ | Steve Jobs, who died Wednesday, reflected on his life, career and mortality in a well-known commencement address at Stanford University in 2005.
Steve_Jobs  commencement  speeches  Communicating_&_Connecting  Stanford 
october 2011 by jerryking
Steve Jobs, Apple Co-Founder, Is Dead - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 5, 2011| WSJ | By YUKARI IWATANI KANE And GEOFFREY A. FOWLER.
Steve_Jobs  obituaries  Apple  trailblazers  cancers 
october 2011 by jerryking
The hype begins for the iPhone 5 - The Globe and Mail
omar el akkad
From Monday's Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Oct. 03, 2011
Omar_el_Akkad  iPhone  Apple  Steve_Jobs  Tim_Cook  Android 
october 2011 by jerryking
How to Fill Steve Jobs' Big Shoes
Aug 26 2011 | FINS - Technology and IT Jobs | By Kelly Eggers
Tim_Cook  Apple  CEOs  Steve_Jobs 
august 2011 by jerryking
Jobs's Legacy: Changing How We Live - WSJ.com
AUGUST 25, 2011 | WSJ | By WALT MOSSBERG. Jobs changed the
way people live by being willing to take big risks on new ideas, and not
be satisfied with small innovations fed by market research. He insisted
on high quality and had the guts to leave out features others found
essential and to kill technologies, e.g. the floppy drive & the
removable battery. [JCK: An example of "culling"?] And he has been a brilliant marketer, personally
passionate about his products.. he introduced the dominant digital music
player, the iPod, & created the most successful digital media
service, iTunes. He introduced the first super-smartphone, the iPhone,
the only truly successful tablet computer, the iPad, which is in the
process of replacing the laptop, at least in part. He built the world's
largest app store and he built a phenomenally successful chain of retail
stores, too.

Jobs has dramatically changed the mobile phone industry, the music
industry, the film and TV industries, the publishing industry and
others.
Apple  breakthroughs  CEOs  culling  dissatisfaction  gut_feelings  high-quality  imagination  legacies  marginal_improvements  moonshots  resignations  risk-taking  Steve_Jobs  Walter_Mossberg 
august 2011 by jerryking
Trip Hawkins Blog: DON VALENTINE
September 3rd, 2009 | blog.digitalchocolate.com | by Trip Hawkins
Don_Valentine  Sequoia  Kleiner_Perkins  Apple  Steve_Jobs 
may 2011 by jerryking
Jenkins, Jr.: How Apple Foot-Dragged to Victory - WSJ.com
* JANUARY 26, 2011

How Apple Foot-Dragged to Victory
Steve Jobs's formula for success: Don't Rush.
Holman_Jenkins  Apple  Steve_Jobs  ux 
january 2011 by jerryking
Master the power of 'no' - for positive results
.Nov 27, 2010 | Financial Times pg. 39 | Jonathan
Moules.The secret of knowing when to say 'no' is to understand the
difference between optimism and recklessness....[jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]........Tempting as some deals
are, it is often good entrepreneurial practice to turn them down.
Optimism is one of the defining traits of an entrepreneur, which is
probably why so many also find it hard to say 'no'. But being negative
can be a positive advantage at certain times. Steve Jobs, the
charismatic co-founder of Apple, once said that innovation, "comes from
saying 'no' to 1,000 things to make sure we don't get on the wrong track
or try to do too much". Saying 'no' to an offer of work, however, is
hard, especially if you are at the early stages of building a company
and especially in the current harsh economic climate when any paid
business seems like a scarce commodity.
ProQuest  business_development  small_business  self-discipline  Steve_Jobs  entrepreneur  optimism  say_"no"  recklessness 
december 2010 by jerryking
Being Steve Jobs' Boss - BusinessWeek
October 20, 2010, 11:00PM EST text size: TT
Being Steve Jobs' Boss
Steve_Jobs 
october 2010 by jerryking
Digital Domain - What Apple’s Steve Jobs Learned in the Wilderness - NYTimes.com
October 2, 2010 | New York Times | By RANDALL STROSS. The
Steve Jobs of the mid-1980s probably never could have made Apple what it
is today if he hadn’t embarked on a torment-filled business odyssey
beginning in 1985...The Steve Jobs who returned to Apple was a much more
capable leader — precisely because he had been badly banged up. He had
spent 12 tumultuous, painful years failing to find a way to make the new
company profitable. Jobs learned to delegate,stopped believing the
idea that computing in the future would resemble computing in the past,
and learned the necessity of retaining great talent. “He’s the same
Steve in his passion for excellence, but a new Steve in his
understanding of how to empower a large company to realize his vision.”
It took 12 dispiriting years, much bruising, and perspective gained
from exile. If Jobs had instead stayed at Apple, the transformation of
Apple Computer into today’s far larger Apple Inc. might never have
happened.
adversity  Apple  exile  large_companies  leaders  lessons_learned  scar_tissue  self-awareness  soul-sapping  Steve_Jobs  wilderness 
october 2010 by jerryking
Apple's Startup Culture
June 14, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Nilofer Merchant. Steve
Jobs' description of Apple's culture as that of a startup gives an
important insight into the company's ongoing success.
organizational_culture  leadership  innovation  Apple  Steve_Jobs 
june 2010 by jerryking
Apple's Second Date with History - WSJ.com
MAY 26, 2010 | WSJ | By HOLMAN W. JENKINS, JR Whose phone
strategy is smarter in the long run—Apple's or Google's? The dangers of
Google's approach? With so many different Android phones floating around
and with so much openness to the Web, the search giant risks delivering
a crummy, fragmented, even disastrous user experience, with security
leaks, viruses and customer service that fails when needed most. For
Apple, the immediate danger is overreach, undermining its ability to
deliver an ineffably superior user experience that just pleases. Apple
has decided it needs an advertising strategy. It will need a TV
strategy, especially after Google last week announced a version of
Android to bring the cloud cornucopia to the biggest, best screen yet.
Apple may also find it needs a strategy to compete in search. It
certainly will need a strategy to make sure its infotainment offerings
through iTunes don't fall behind in price and variety what Android users
can get through their browsers.
Apple  Steve_Jobs  Google  smartphones  strategy  delighting_customers  strategies  open_source  Holman_Jenkins  overreach 
may 2010 by jerryking
Jobs Attacks Flash As Unfit for iPhone - WSJ.com
APRIL 27, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By YUKARI IWATANI KANE And BEN WORTHEN
Apple  Adobe  Steve_Jobs  disputes 
april 2010 by jerryking
Why focus groups tell you the obvious
Mar 24, 2010. | Financial Times. pg. 14 | Luke Johnson. Great
breakthroughs in fields such as new product development are frequently
achieved by avoiding surveys and committees altogether. Constant testing
can lead to blandness and safety-first choices. In creative affairs,
corporate brainstorming sessions usually end up with groupthink
dullness, all originality squeezed out because of the fear of failure or
through the influence of office politics. As Steve Jobs said: "It's
really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people
don't know what they want until you show it to them."
ProQuest  Luke_Johnson  research_methods  product_development  surveys  market_research  breakthroughs  moonshots  Steve_Jobs  unarticulated_desires 
april 2010 by jerryking
Apple’s Spat With Google Is Getting Personal - NYTimes.com
March 12, 2010 | New York Times | By BRAD STONE and MIGUEL
HELFT. Mr. Jobs, Mr. Schmidt and their companies are now engaged in a
gritty battle royale over the future and shape of mobile computing and
cellphones, with implications that are reverberating across the digital
landscape.

In the last six months, Apple and Google have jousted over acquisitions,
patents, directors, advisers and iPhone applications. Mr. Jobs and Mr.
Schmidt have taken shots at each other’s companies in the media and in
private exchanges with employees....At the heart of their dispute is a
sense of betrayal: Mr. Jobs believes that Google violated the alliance
between the companies by producing cellphones that physically,
technologically and spiritually resembled the iPhone. In short, he feels
that his former friends at Google picked his pocket.
Apple  Google  smartphones  feuds  disputes  Steve_Jobs  AdMob  Android 
march 2010 by jerryking
The Curse of the Unexpected
12.01.97 | Forbes Magazine |

I GREW UP IN WALES. Its difficult to imagine a place more removed from Silicon Valley and information technology than South Wales. Access to technology there seemed as remote as access to the back side of Mars. My first step was to come to America. After that it was like a homing instinct. I was attracted to the West Coast and gravitated there. I came upon Silicon Valley almost by accident.

I was working for Time at its San Francisco bureau in the early 1980s. That was right near the time when the first personal computer was introduced, so there were lots of stories being done on Silicon Valley companies. Before then I didn't really know what a venture capitalist was. I hadn't heard the term. But I began to run into venture capitalists and started to understand what they did.

Of course, I had no idea how big this would all become. I remember talking to Steve Jobs in the early days of Apple. Apple was probably a $300 million to $400 million company, and Jobs said he didn't see any reason why Apple couldn't be a $10 billion company. I thought he was smoking some strange form of weed.

We don't even use technology very much in our business. We rarely use anything more complicated than the back of an envelope to make a calculation. The computer has become more of a communication tool than a computing tool. Losing it would be like losing the phone. Business is judging and thinking, and reacting to people. It was the same before computers came along.

Every now and then, were reminded that some technology just isn't needed. On a few occasions we've invested in companies because they made some sort of technological gadgets or gizmos that we thought we would like to own and buy, either at the office or at home -- and they've been failures. For example, years ago we invested in a company that was at the dawn of the PC business. It was a bridge between word processors and PCs. We ended up with nothing more to show for our investment than half a dozen typewriters around the office that cost us $300,000 apiece.

There's a perverse thrill to being a hamster on the technology treadmill. It's very exciting trying to fight all the battles that a startup has to win to succeed. But information technology isn't a substitute for any of the real pleasures of life. I don't lose sight of the fact that you can still derive a lot of pleasure from taking a walk in the country, riding a bicycle, reading a book in your backyard, having dinner with family and friends. I don't think computers are a substitute for teaching children how to paint, or play the piano, or think for themselves. This technology wont necessarily make my kids lives better. It might just mean they'll get carpal tunnel syndrome a little sooner.

This technology also is having a major impact on the distribution of wealth. Clearly, many people will have access to information more readily than they have in the past. But the notion that you're going to have a computer or a television in a shantytown outside Buenos Aires doesn't make the shantytown any closer to a penthouse apartment. At the end of the day, I think we're building a world economy where wealth is created within a few chosen companies [JCK: essentially, the powerlaw at work in generating unicorns], and most of the wealth is either owned or shared by the people associated with those companies.

Yes, a whole bunch of people will be enabled by what those companies do. But the real wealth will go to the people intimately associated with those entities. And if your kid doesn't go to MIT or Harvard or CalTech, or half a dozen other prestigious places, forget it. They'll be among the permanently dispossessed
Michael_Moritz  Sequoia  powerlaw  venture_capital  unexpected  Silicon_Valley  Steve_Jobs  vc  unevenly_distributed 
february 2010 by jerryking
D Transcript: Gates, Jobs Reminisce - WSJ.com
MAY 31, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | Following is a transcript
of the interview Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg conducted with
Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates and Apple CEO Steve Jobs at the D5
conference on May 30, 2007. How often is Apple on your radar screen at
Microsoft in a business sense?

Bill: Well, they're on the radar screen as an opportunity. In a few
cases like the Zune, if you go over to that group, they think of Apple
as a competitor. They love the fact that Apple's created a gigantic
market and they're going to try and come in and contribute something to
that.

Steve: And we love them because they're all customers.
transcripts  Kara_Swisher  Walter_Mossberg  billgates  Steve_Jobs  Apple  Microsoft  iPhone 
february 2010 by jerryking
Apple Sees New Money in Old Media - WSJ.com
JANUARY 20, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By YUKARI IWATANI
KANE And ETHAN SMITH. Steve Jobs's Tablet Device Looks to Repackage TV,
Magazines, Just as iPod Changed Music Sales.
Apple  Steve_Jobs  tablets 
january 2010 by jerryking
The DECADE of STEVE
Nov 23, 2009 | Fortune Vol. 160, Iss. 10; pg. 92 | ADAM
LASHINSKY. Youthful founder gets booted from his company in the 1980s,
returns in the 1990s, and in the following decade survives two brushes
with death, one securities-law scandal, an also-ran product lineup, and
his own often unpleasant demeanor to become the dominant personality in
four distinct industries, a billionaire many times over, and CEO of the
most valuable company in Silicon Valley. Sound too far-fetched to be
true? Perhaps. Yet it happens to be the real-life story of Steve Jobs
and his outsize impact on everything he touches.
Steve_Jobs  Apple 
november 2009 by jerryking
Mike Moritz returns to 'The Little Kingdom' - Nov. 5, 2009
November 5, 2009 | Fortune | By Michael V. Copeland, senior
writer. "How has your study of Jobs and Apple helped you in your job as
a venture capitalist? Extraordinary, rare companies -- like Apple in
those first two or three years -- have some common traits. The
individuals will be different, the businesses will be different, the
decade will be different, but the purpose, the drive, the sense of
mission, the intelligence of the founders -- those will be common. If
you have been around the start of success, it's far easier to recognize
it again. "
Michael_Moritz  Steve_Jobs  Apple  CEOs  purpose  mission-driven 
november 2009 by jerryking
Google's Banker
May 3, 2004 | Fortune | By Adam Lashinsky.... Valentine also
took a different approach on making investments: He bet on the
racetrack, not the jockey. "... you build great companies by finding
monster markets that are in transition, and you find the people later,"
says Valentine...."But in Moritz, Valentine saw a resemblance to another
precocious go-getter he had observed at close range: Steve Jobs.
"They're both incredibly aggressive questioners," says Valentine. "And
our business is all about figuring out which questions are relevant in
making a decision, because the people who are starting a company (i.e. the founders) don't
have a clue what the answers are."... Valentine's principles: only
targeting businesses with fat margins; avoid capital-intensive
businesses; take measured steps; never underestimate the difficulty of
changing consumer behavior; don't begin a rollout until you're sure the
recipe is working; avoid any business Wall Street is prepared to throw
hundreds of millions of dollars at.
behavioral_change  capital-intensity  consumer_behavior  disequilibriums  Don_Valentine  founders  large_markets  margins  Michael_Moritz  precociousness  questions  rollouts  rules_of_the_game  Sequoia  Steve_Jobs  vc  venture_capital  Wall_Street 
october 2009 by jerryking
HOW THE iPOD CHANGED EVERYTHING
May 13, 2009 | The Globe & Mail | by MATT HARTLEY
Apple  iPODs  Steve_Jobs  downloads  digital_media 
may 2009 by jerryking
Information Wants to Be Expensive - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 23, 2009 WSJ op-ed by L. GORDON CROVITZ arguing that newspapers need to act like they're worth something.


Time magazine published a cover story earlier this month headlined "How to Save Your Newspaper." In it, former Time Managing Editor Walter Isaacson noted how odd it is to charge for subscriptions in print but not online. "Even an old print junkie like me has quit subscribing to the New York Times, because if it doesn't see fit to charge me for its content, I'd feel like a fool paying for it. This is not a business model that makes sense."......People are happy to pay for news and information however it's delivered, but only if it has real, differentiated value. Traders must have their Bloomberg or Thomson Reuters terminal. Lawyers wouldn't go to court without accessing the Lexis or West online service..........By 2007, the Journal's Web site had reached one million paying subscribers who value full access and convenient navigation to its unique business news. Another 20 million people each month read Journal articles made available free. Likewise, the Financial Times and ESPN generate significant online revenues from subscribers, along with free content. So do consumer services such as Consumer Reports and Zagat. Steve Jobs proved we'll pay up to $1 for digital songs on iTunes, and Amazon's Kindle established $10 as reasonable for a digital book. .........For years, publishers and editors have asked the wrong question: Will people pay to access my newspaper content on the Web? The right question is: What kind of journalism can my staff produce that is different and valuable enough that people will pay for it online?..........newspaper journalists still report the key local news. American Lawyer founder Steven Brill argues that "local newspapers are the best brands, and people will pay a small amount to get information -- whether it be a zoning board or a Little League game -- that they can't get anywhere else." A few local newspapers, such as the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette and Hong Kong's South China Morning Post, charge for access online, knowing their news can't be found elsewhere...........When author Stewart Brand coined the expression "Information wants to be free," he focused on how technology makes it cheap and easy to communicate and share knowledge. But the rest of his quote is rarely noticed.

This says, "Information also wants to be expensive." The right information in today's complex economy and society can make a huge difference in our professional and personal lives. Not having this information can also make a big difference, especially if someone else does have it. And for valuable information, online is a great new way for it to be valued.
asking_the_right_questions  Bloomberg  brands  differentiation  digital_media  information  iTunes  journalism  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  Lexis  local_journalism  newspapers  op_ed  questions  Steve_Jobs  Steven_Brill  Stewart_Brand  subscriptions  Thomson_Reuters  TIME_Inc.  traders  Walter_Isaacson 
february 2009 by jerryking
Who's Going to Fund the Next Steve Jobs? - WSJ.com
JULY 18, 2008 WSJ op-ed by JAMES FREEMAN arguing that Sarbox and Spitzerism are stiffling American innovation.
entrepreneurship  innovation  entrepreneur  cheap_revolution  SOX  overregulation  start_ups  Steve_Jobs 
february 2009 by jerryking

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