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jerryking : stuxnet   10

Listening In: cyber security in an insecure age, by Susan Landau
April 8, 2018 | Financial Times | Kadhim Shubber 10 HOURS AG

Review of [Listening In: cyber security in an insecure age, by Susan Landau, Yale University Press, $25]

....so Landau’s latest work leaves the reader wishing for a deeper reckoning with these complex issues.

Landau is a respected expert in cryptography and computer security, with a long career both studying and working in the field. She was an engineer at Sun Microsystems for over a decade and is currently a professor in cyber security at Tufts University. Her clean, knowledgeable writing reflects the depth of her expertise — with just a trace of jargon at times — as she traces the tug of war that has played out between law enforcement and cryptographers in recent decades.....Landau persuasively argues that the increasingly digital and interconnected society and economy we inhabit creates vulnerabilities that we ignore at our peril.......Landau is an advocate for strong computer security, and uses this book to reject calls for “back doors” that would allow law enforcement access to encrypted hardware, like iPhones, or messaging apps, such as WhatsApp. But she also encourages governments to become better at proactive “front door” hacking. In the process, she warns, they should not rush to disclose security weaknesses they discover, which inevitably leaves them open for others to exploit......Yet we have seen that the government’s toolbox can also fall into the wrong hands. In 2016 and 2017, a powerful set of hacking tools built by the NSA were leaked by hackers.
Apple  back_doors  books  book_reviews  cryptography  cyber_security  FBI  hacking  nonfiction  Stuxnet  Tim_Cook  vulnerabilities 
april 2018 by jerryking
Software as Weaponry in a Computer-Connected World - The New York Times
JUNE 7, 2016 | NYT | By NICOLE PERLROTH.

On average, there are 15 to 50 defects per 1,000 lines of code in delivered software, according to Steve McConnell, the author of “Code Complete.” Today, most of the applications we rely on — Google Chrome, Microsoft, Firefox and Android — contain millions of lines of code. And the complexity of technology is increasing, and with it the potential for defects.

The motivation to find exploitable defects in widely used code has never been higher. Governments big and small are stockpiling vulnerabilities and exploits in hardware, software, applications, algorithms and even security defenses like firewalls and antivirus software.

They are using these holes to monitor their perceived enemies, and many governments are storing them for a rainy day, when they might just have to drop a payload that disrupts or degrades an adversary’s transportation, energy or financial system.

They are willing to pay anyone who can find and exploit these weaknesses top dollar to hand them over, and never speak a word to the companies whose programmers inadvertently wrote them into software in the first place.
adversaries  software  hackers  books  coding  vulnerabilities  exploits  software_bugs  bounties  black_markets  arms_race  cyber_warfare  cyber_security  Stuxnet  espionage  Iran  security_&_intelligence  malware  cyberweapons  weaponry  stockpiles  financial_system 
june 2016 by jerryking
Unit 8200: Israel’s cyber spy agency - FT.com
July 10, 2015 | FT| by John Reed.

Unit 8200, or shmone matayim as it’s called in Hebrew, is the equivalent of America’s National Security Agency and the largest single military unit in the Israel Defence Forces....Unit 8200. In few other countries does the military establishment mingle so closely with academia and business, to all three sectors’ profit. Last year, Israel’s export of cyber security products — designed to protect companies, banks and governments from the growing “dark web” of hackers, fraudsters and snoopers — topped $6bn, exceeding Israeli exports of military hardware for the first time. Today Israel, with just eight million people, captures about 10 per cent of the global cyber security market, which is growing rapidly after high-profile hacks that in some cases — such as at Target, and Sony last year — have cost CEOs their jobs....In an open letter in September 2014, published by Israel’s Yedioth Ahronoth newspaper and broadcast on Channel 10, a group of 43 serving and former 8200 reservists revealed what they said were coercive spying tactics being used on innocent Palestinians, including the collection of embarrassing sexual, financial or other information....But what does 8200 actually do? Israel, as Netanyahu never tires of saying, lives in a “bad neighbourhood” in the Middle East, surrounded by several countries it classifies as enemy states. This requires world-class hacking and artificial intelligence tools as warfare moves from conventional battlefields — land, sea and air — to include cyber terrain.
artificial_intelligence  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  dark_web  hackers  IDF  Israel  Israeli  security_&_intelligence  spycraft  Stuxnet  Unit_8200 
july 2015 by jerryking
Cyber-warfare: Turning worm
Dec 13th 2014 || The Economist |

Timekeeper
Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World’s First Digital Weapon. By Kim Zetter. Crown; 433 pages; $25 and £20
computer_viruses  cyber_warfare  Stuxnet  security_&_intelligence  books  malware  software  coding  exploits 
december 2014 by jerryking
Who Controls The Internet?
Oct 9, 2010 | Financial Times pg. 14 | Misha Glenny. US
Cyber Command is the Pentagon command charged with defending the US
against catastrophic internet-based attacks. Fully operational from last
week, it is the latest in a series of dramatic moves across the world
aimed at monitoring and controlling how all of us use the web...Western
governments cite three central threats that justify the increased
presence of military, intelligence and law enforcement agencies in
cyberspace - crime, commercial espionage and warfare....Misha Glenny's
"McMafia: Seriously Organised Crime" is published by Vintage.
GCHQ  cyber_warfare  cyber_security  threats  ProQuest  Pentagon  catastrophic_risk  organized_crime  industrial_espionage  Stuxnet  books  U.S._Cyber_Command 
october 2010 by jerryking
Most Sophisticated Malware Ever Targets Iran
Sep 22 2010, - The Atlantic Alexis Madrigal . A computer worm
is drawing awed respect and fear from security researchers, even as
they wonder how and why it was created.

Four things about Stuxnet are particularly noteworthy, according to
experts consulted by ComputerWorld. One, it appears to be the most
sophisticated malware anyone has ever seen. Two, because of that,
researchers do not believe it could have been created by a private
group. They think it's the handiwork of a nation-state. Third, it could
control real world machinery, like, say, a power plant. Fourth, it
appears to have targeted Iran.
malware  Iran  cyber_warfare  computer_viruses  Stuxnet  physical_world  cyberphysical  power_grid 
september 2010 by jerryking

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